U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AIR MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

ARMY COMMENDATION MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

OIF/OEF, page 3, M-Z

AMEDD Silver Star

Interesting Notes:

Specialist Gregory A. Waters was originally awarded the Silver Star. Upon a military-wide review of more than 1,300 valor awards since 9/11 in 2016, his award was upgraded to the Distinguished Service Cross.

CPL Angelo Vaccaro is the only known double Silver Star recipient in the current conflicts.

Captain Patrick Williams, a Physician Assistant, used an innovative technique to stop the bleeding while under fire. He then maintained pressure on the artery from point of injury throughout the evacuation to a Combat Support Hospital, thereby saving the life of the injured Soldier.

SGT Jose Rivas had only been in his unit for one week and was on his first mission with them when he performed the deeds of valor that would earn him his Silver Star.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

*MEYER, HARRISON
Private First Class, U. S. Army
Company D, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment, 2d Brigade Combat Team, 2d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 26 November 2004
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Harrison J. Meyer, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman in Company D, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Parachute Infantry Regiment, 2d Brigade Combat Team, 2d Infantry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 26 November 2004, in Iraq. Around noon on that date, Private First Class Meyer and the rest of 3rd Platoon, Company D were in the 20th hour of a patrol extended by clashes with insurgents. They’d just taken up post in an abandoned building in the Mula’ab district when a Soldier was hit by sniper fire. Private First Class Meyer rushed up the stairs and treated a gunshot wound to the chest of Private Brian Grant. Though Private Grant later died in a hospital, Private First Class Meyer treated and comforted him until he was evacuated to an aid station. The platoon moved out of the building to find the sniper, but as they sprinted across a street toward the sniper’s perch, heavy machine-gun fire raked the patrol. Four Soldiers were hit in the legs and were stuck wounded in the open street. Private First Class Meyer himself had been shot in the calf and lower abdomen, but was able to move back to cover. The platoon couldn’t suppress the incoming fire. Ignoring his own wounds, and without orders, Private First Class Meyer ran out to try to move his wounded colleagues to safety. Placing himself between the wounded Soldiers and the enemy, he was struck by machine-gun rounds multiple times and mortally wounded. Private First Class Meyer's disregard for his own safety and courage under enemy machine-gun fire saved the lives of five soldiers. His valorous actions are in keeping with the highest standards of selfless service and reflects great credit upon himself, Delta Company, 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry Regiment, Multi-National Corps Iraq, and the United States Army.
Home of record: Worthington, Ohio

MIKE, JASON L.
Specialist, U.S. Army
Medic (Attached), 617th Military Police Company, 503d Military Police Battalion (Airborne), 18th Military Police Brigade
Date of Action: 20 March 2005
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Jason L. Mike, United States Army, for exceptionally valorous achievement during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Specialist Mike's heroic actions on 20 March 2005, during combat operations in Iraq, contributed to the overwhelming success of the Multi National Corps-Iraq mission. While serving as the Medic for RAVEN 42, in the 617th Military Police Company, 503d Military Police Battalion (Airborne), the 18th Military Police Brigade, Specialist Mike supported a counterattack of anti-Iraq forces (AIF) who were ambushing a convoy with heavy AK-47 assault rifle fire, RPK machine gun fire, and rocket propelled grenades. He engaged the AIF with his M-9 until his fellow soldiers fell injured. Specialist Mike immediately pulled the wounded soldiers out of the line of direct fire and returned fire with the injured soldiers' weapons. When the threat was eliminated he provided medical aid to his critically wounded comrades. His actions saved the lives of the three wounded soldiers and numerous convoy members. Specialist Mike's bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of the 503d Military Police Battalion (Airborne), the 18th Military Police Brigade, and the United States Army.
Home of record: Radcliffe, Kentucky

*PENEY, JONATHAN K.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
Company D, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
Date of Action: 31 May - 1 June 2010
Citation:
SGT Jonathan K. Peney distinguished himself through exceptionally valorous achievement from May 31 to June 1, 2010 while serving as a Ranger Platoon Medic in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. During the night of May 31, Company D, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment executed a helicopter assault raid on an objective in order to disrupt the enemy. Following insertion by helicopter, the ground force completed their maneuver to clear the objective area and establish security, in order to remain on the objective and continue operations throughout the following day. Shortly after dawn, the ground force was effectively engaged by multiple concealed enemy fighting positions from the South, East and West of the objective area. Just moments after making contact with the enemy, a Ranger Team Leader positioned on a rooftop on the northern end of the objective was shot and critically wounded. With an intense volley of effective enemy machine gun fire impacting the rooftop and the adjacent outer courtyard walls, it was clearly evident that the enemy was targeting the squad that was pinned down and exposed on the roof. The enemy was in the midst of what would turn out to be a superbly coordinated attack on the platoon from three different directions at varying ranges of 150-300 meters and lasting nearly an hour. The automatic weapons fire was so intense and effective; it was unfathomable that the platoon did not sustain more serious casualties at this point. With the squad pinned down in a prone position and a Ranger Team Leader gravely wounded and suffering a tension pneumothorax, the squad called out for a medic. SGT Peney, the ground force medic, received the call from the platoon sergeant requesting medical treatment for the wounded team leader. SGT Peney was centrally located in the main courtyard and answered the summons. SGT Peney moved to the base of the ladder on the South wall of the compound. Without hesitation and with total disregard for his own personal safety, SGT Peney knowingly climbed through the barrage of effective enemy fire in a valorous attempt to reach the wounded team leader and provide him with critical medical treatment. At the top of his climb, when he crested the rooftop, SGT Peney was mortally wounded by enemy fire. SGT Peney’s valorous actions under direct fire and his overwhelming dedication and commitment to the welfare of his ground force on the battlefield inspired the men of the platoon to gain fire superiority over the enemy. The platoon answered with an overwhelming volume of fire to cover the egress of the pinned down squad and the casualties off the roof of the target building. Throughout the remainder of the day, the platoon repelled numerous enemy attacks on the objective area. SGT Peney’s selfless actions and tremendous fortitude in the face of a heavily armed and well trained enemy earn him great distinction among his peers as he knowingly and willingly climbed into a hail of gunfire to aid his critically wounded Ranger buddy. SGT Peney’s valorous actions reflect great credit upon himself, the 75th Ranger Regiment and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Marietta, GA

*PUGH, ROBERT SHANE
Sergeant, U.S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion, 155th Infantry Regiment
Date of Action: 2 March 2005
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Robert Shane Pugh, United States Army, for exceptional display of heroism and selfless service while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company A, 1st Battalion, 155th Infantry Regiment, on 2 March 2005, during military operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM III. Sergeant Pugh's platoon was conducting a combat patrol in a hostile area near Iskandariyah, Iraq. While providing security for a group of engineer soldiers, an Improvised Explosive Device detonated seriously wounding Sergeant Pugh and Sergeant First Class Ellis Martin. Although in extreme pain, Sergeant Pugh directed treatment instructions to the members of his platoon for both himself and Sergeant First Class Martin. He remained calm and continued to give instructions until the medical evacuation helicopter arrived. Sergeant Pugh passed away on route to the hospital, however his courage and disregard for his own welfare resulted in saving the life of a fellow comrade who was severely wounded. His bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon himself, the 1st Battalion, 155th Infantry Regiment, Multi-National Corps Iraq, and the United States Army.
Home of record: Stonewall, Mississippi

REZA, IVAN
Sergeant, U. S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 1st BCT, 1st Armored Division
Date of Action: 20 October 2006
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Ivan Reza, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM in Iraq on 20 October 2006. Sergeant Reza moved in the line of enemy fire in disregard of his own safety to provide aid as a Combat Medic to a critically wounded soldier. Though wounded himself, Sergeant Reza refused aid and continued treating the wounded Soldier until he reached the Battalion Aid Station. His efforts helped to save the Soldier's life. His heroic actions during combat operations in Iraq contributed to the overwhelming success of the Command's mission, His bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflects distinct credit upon himself, the First Brigade Combat Team, the Multi-National Corps - Iraq, and the United States Army.

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD:
Sergeant Ivan Reza heroically distinguished himself by exceptionally gallant conduct in the face of the enemy of the United States as a Combat Medic, Company A, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, Task Force 1-36, Hit, Iraq, on 20 October 2006 during Operation Iraqi Freedom. On 20 October 2006, Sergeant Reza was accompanying his section as the platoon medic. His section was tasked to monitor the local mosque message and was stationed along Route Aspen in Hit, Iraq, in Al Anbar Province. After the message was complete, the section leader, Staff Sergeant Guillory, began movement back to the company CP. The Bradley Fighting Vehicles began to move when one of the Bradley's became disabled when the track came out of alignment with the sprocket. Staff Sergeant Guillory ordered the section to halt and began dismounting his squad to provide security while the crew conducted repairs. When the ramp was lowered the squad with Sergeant Reza moved out and assumed security positions around the vehicle. Corporal McNew, the vehicle gunner opened his turret shield door and began to dismount when the vehicle came under heavy machine gun and small arms fire directed into the back ramp of the vehicle. Corporal McNew was instantly hit in the leg and abdomen. Staff Sergeant Guillory pulled Corporal McNew into the turret and called for medic support. Sergeant Reza, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved into the line of fire and in the back ramp. He was immediately hit with a gunshot wound to the abdomen that would be later classified as "urgent surgical." Disregarding his own wounds, he helped Staff Sergeant Guillory pull Corporal McNew back into the crew compartment as the ramp was being raised. Inside the vehicle, he then began immediate lifesaving techniques to stabilize Corporal McNew. Staff Sergeant Guillory called for medical evacuation support and the company ambulance arrived to assist. Still under fire, the ambulance moved to the back of the Bradley and both vehicles lowered their ramps. Sergeant Guillory helped move Corporal McNew into the back of the ambulance. Still refusing medical attention, Sergeant Reza continued to help stabilize Corporal McNew while the ambulance moved back towards the Battalion Aid Station. Once at the Aid Station, Sergeant Reza then allowed medics and the doctor to give him medical aid for his own wounds. The Battalion Surgeon immediately recognized the seriousness of Sergeant Reza's wounds and began stabilizing him for medical evacuation to Al Asad and immediate surgery. Sergeant Reza was subsequently evacuated to Walter Reed Army Medical Center for further treatment and recovery. Sergeant Reza's heroism under intense enemy fire was directly responsible for saving the life of a critically injured Soldier. Disregarding the danger and despite his own wounds, he administered critical care to a fellow Soldier wounded in action. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon himself, the Ready First Combat Team, the Multi-National Corps - Iraq, and the United States Army

RIVAS, JOSE M.
Sergeant, U. S. Army
Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division
Date of Action: 22 April 2007
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Jose M. Rivas, United States Army. Sergeant Jose M. Rivas distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Combat Company, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, on 22 April 2007, near Shudergay Village, Afghanistan. On the morning of 22 April 2007, 2d Platoon Combat Company was conducting a cordon and search of Shudergay Village when the platoon became engaged by 30-40 enemy personnel from 15-20 enemy positions using AK-47s, sniper rifles, PKMs, RPKs, and RPGs lasting approximately 17 hours. After receiving small arms fire from two enemy OPs the platoon was able to clear the village. Once the village was clear one enemy sniper began to engage the patrol base, hitting one ANA Soldier in the pelvic area. Sergeant Rivas, the Platoon Medic, immediately moved the casualty into a room in a home in the village and began working on the patient while under intense enemy fire. The enemy sniper continued to place rounds inside the room Sergeant Rivas had chosen for his CCP. Sergeant Rivas continued to treat the casualty, regardless of the fact that sniper rounds were ricocheting around the room. Due to the intense sniper fire, Sergeant Rivas was not able to relocate the casualty to a safer area. Sergeant Rivas cleared a bed area and immediately opened his aid bag and began working on the casualty, calling out the casualties status and vitals to the Platoon Sergeant for the l0-Line MEDEVAC request. Sergeant Rivas triaged the casualty as "urgent surgical". Once he stabilized the casualty he organized an ANA litter team to move the casualty over 300 meters of rocky, uneven terrain to reach the LZ. En route to the LZ Sergeant Rivas' CASEVAC team became engaged by four enemy positions. The enemy placed heavy accurate direct fire on the CASEVAC element, pinning them down for over an hour and a half. With total disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Rivas continued to treat the casualty amidst heavy enemy fire. As the ANA Soldier's blood pressure began to drop, Sergeant Rivas quickly administered two more IV's to stabilize the casualty, the entire time using his own body to shield the casualty from the heavy enemy contact. While treating the ANA soldier, Sergeant Rivas found out that the Platoon Sergeant had fractured his ankle during the engagement. Sergeant Rivas finished stabilizing the ANA casualty, and then he moved back 40 meters through intense enemy fire in order to assess the Platoon Sergeant. He accurately assessed that it was a severe sprain, not a break, but the Platoon Sergeant would be unable to walk on the ankle. Sergeant Rivas then had another Soldier assist him in putting the leg in a splint. He took charge of the nearest group of Soldiers and assigned a two man litter team to assist the Platoon Sergeant the rest of the way to the LZ. Sergeant Rivas then moved back through the 40 meter partially open area to continue treating the ANA Soldier, crawling on his hands and knees to avoid the enemy small arms fire that was impacting around him. He once again assessed his casualty and passed up both causalities' information so that the MEDEVAC helicopter would have updated information on the patients. Sergeant Rivas exemplifies what it means to be a Combat Medic. Sergeant Rivas had only been with the platoon for less than a week and was on his first mission when he showed extreme courage under intense enemy small arms fire and total disregard for his own personal safety during the 17 hour fight. His valorous actions under intense enemy fire showcase his personal courage, dedication to duty and commitment to his men and his ANA Soldiers.

ROHRS, PETER D.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
Company C, 3-82nd General Support Aviation Battalion, 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 9 November 2007
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Peter David Rohrs, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Flight Medic with Company C, 3d Battalion, 82d Combat Aviation Brigade, 82d Airborne Division, during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM VIII, on 9 November 2007, in Afghanistan. Staff Sergeant Rohrs' selfless actions were directly responsible for the rescue of twelve critically wounded coalition Soldiers. His courage, tactical abilities, and regard for the safety of his patients, crew and aircraft were remarkable. Staff Sergeant Rohrs’ performance of duty is in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 82nd Combat Aviation Brigade, Combined Joint Task Force 82, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Fayetteville, NC

*SEBBAN, BENJAMIN L.
Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army
5th Squadron, 73rd Cavalry (Airborne Reconnaissance), 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 17 March 2007
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), has awarded the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class Benjamin L. Sebban, United States Army, for gallantry in action: On 17 March 2007 during combat operations against an armed enemy of the United States as a Senior Medic, while assigned to 5th Squadron, 73d Cavalry Regiment (Airborne Reconnaissance), 82d Airborne Division, in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. On 17 March 2007, in Diyala Province, Iraq. Sergeant First Class Sebban safeguarded the lives of 86 paratroopers during a Suicide Vehicle Borne Improvised Explosive Device attack on a combat outpost. While conducting patrol base operations, Sergeant First Class Sebban noticed a civilian truck accelerating toward the compound laden with explosives. Stepping from behind the cover of an uparmored HMMWV, he moved toward the vehicle and warned his fellow paratroopers of the impending attack yelling three times until the explosion from the vehicle knocked him down. Though mortally wounded by shrapnel injuries to his abdomen, groin and legs, Sergeant First Class Sebban immediately moved to the aid station to begin treating his fellow wounded paratroopers until he collapsed and succumbed to his wounds. Sergeant First Class Sebban's valiant actions prevented enemy insurgent forces from overrunning the United States Force’s position and caused the enemy element to retreat. His performance reflects great credit upon himself, the 82d Airborne Division, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: South Amboy, New Jersey

SMITH, DARIUS L.
Specialist, U.S. Army
A Company, 1st Battalion, 36th Armored Infantry Regiment
Date of Action: 2 August 2006
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, Authorized by the Act of Congress July 9, 1918, has awarded the Silver Star to Specialist Darius L. Smith for Gallantry in Action on 2 August 2006. For exceptionally gallant service during Operation Iraqi Freedom on 2 August 2006, the Apache White Platoon, A Company, 1st Battalion, 36th Armored Infantry Regiment came under heavy automatic small arms fire wounding one of the Soldiers. Disregarding his own personal safety, Specialist Smith, the unit’s combat medic, moved under enemy fire to the wounded Soldier, carried him to a covered position, and began administering aid. Specialist Smith’s actions undoubtedly saved the life of a fellow Soldier. His heroic actions during combat operations in Iraq contributed to the overwhelming success of the command’s mission. His bravery is in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflects distinct credit upon himself, the Ready First Combat Team, the Multi-National Corps-Iraq, and the United States Army.

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD:
Specialist Darius L. Smith, United States Army, heroically distinguished himself by exceptionally gallant conduct in the face of the enemy of the United States as Combat Medic for A Company, 1st Battalion, 36th Infantry Regiment, in Hit, Iraq, on 2 August 2006, during Operation Iraqi Freedom.

At 1730 hours on 2 August 2006, the Apache White platoon was conducting a squad reconnaissance and census of the “M” sector and marketplace in Hit, Iraq with a section of Bradley Fighting Vehicles in support. The squad was moving north along route Plantain to the intersection of routes Plantain and Aspen. The dismounted squad, under the control of SSG ____, took heavy small arms and machine gun fire from the direction of route Chestnut. SPC ______ was hit with three rounds of 7.62 in the front of his interceptor body armor. The rounds hit his SAPI plate knocking him so the ground and incapacitating him. One of the rounds caused a grazing wound along SPC ______’s torso and arm. The squad medic, SPC Smith, immediately began to move to SPC _____. Upon initiating movement, SPC Smith came under direct fire and hit the ground. Realizing that he was in the “kill zone” of automatic fire with SPC ______, he came back to his feet and moved to SPC ______. Still under heavy machine gun fire, he picked SPC ______ up and buddy carried him across the street to a nearby house. The enemy continued to direct their fire towards SPC Smith and SPC ______. The nearest fire team, under direction of SGT _______, returned fire providing cover for SPC Smith and SPC ______. Once inside the house, SPC Smith closed the door behind him and the enemy poured heavy machine gun fire against the structure and the door. SPC Smith began administering first aid to SPC ______ and preparing him for the casualty evacuation. SPC ______ was moved to Firm Base 4 and then air evacuated to Al Asad as an urgent surgical priority, where he was treated for his wounds. SPC Smith’s quick action and bravery under intense fire were ultimately responsible for saving the life of SPC ______. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Ready First Combat Team, the Multi-National Corps-Iraq, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 272-240, Headquarters, MNC-I, 13 October 2006

SOLOMON, ALAN D.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
Date of Action: 26 October 2010
Citation:
SGT Alan D. Solomon distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous achievement on Oct. 26, 2010 while deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom while service as a Special Operations Combat Medic. On Oct. 26, 2010, the task force received intelligence indicating that a high value individual was located in a small village. Information throughout the day indicated that armed Taliban fighters were moving in and around the target compound and aircraft flying in the area were routinely engaged with small arms and rocket propelled grenades. The Ranger platoon began receiving effective fire from an enemy machine gun position to the East of the HLZ. The platoon inserted and moved to contain and isolate the target compound to the North and South. Enemy personnel were reported moving towards their location and the Platoon started taking harassing fire from multiple directions. After the platoon entered and cleared the target compound, the Ranger Platoon began receiving effective machine gun and small arms fire from the West and Southwest. SGT Solomon realized that the machine gun fire was affecting a blocking position and seeing the volume of fire his fellow Rangers were receiving, SGT Solomon began providing suppressive fires to augment the blocking position. With the intensity and duration of the heavy gun fire exchange, it wasn’t long before ammunition started running low. SGT Solomon took great initiative and exposed himself to heave effective enemy fire in order to run back to the target compound to retrieve ammunition. Carrying as much ammunition as he could, SGT Solomon moved back to the blocking position still under heavy effective enemy fire. He then distributed the ammunition. The Rangers at the blocking position continued to receive precise heavy machine gun and small arms fires from the West and Southwest for the next 40 minutes. As the rest of the Platoon exited the target compound, the enemy in the ditch no more than 50 meters away and multiple enemy positions to the West increased their rates of fire on the blocking position with effective RPG and machine gun fire. A Ranger Squad Leader was temporarily knocked out and a PFC, received minor shrapnel wounds to his right forearm from an RPG round that landed less than 10 feet away from their position in the ditch. SGT Solomon immediately ran through the incoming fire and found seven of his comrades down on the ground. As the platoon Medic and Advanced Tactical Practitioner, he quickly and deliberately triaged all Rangers and focused on the two most critically wounded patients. Once they were stabilized, he gathered his casualties and prepared to move out. SGT Solomon transported the two ambulatory casualties through 300 meters of arduous terrain while still under fire from a relentless enemy. As the helicopters were on approach, they began receiving effective machine-gun fire. Placing himself at great risk again, SGT Solomon immediately shielded his casualties from the gun fire with his body, ensuring no further harm came to his patients. After he loaded his two patients on the helicopters, SGT Solomon came back out into enemy fire to help his Platoon Sergeant who was suppressing enemy positions in order to allow for a safety EXFIL for the Ranger Platoon. Through his distinctive accomplishments, SGT Solomon reflected great credit upon himself, this command and the United States Army.

SPRAKTES, EMMETT W.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
Company C, 1-168th General Support Aviation Battalion, California National Guard
Date of Action: 17 July 2009
Citation:
On 17 July 2009, 3d Platoon, Charlie Company (3/C), 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry, was on a dismounted patrol to deny Anti-Afghan Forces freedom of movement near Pun Sar Ridge, Watapur Valley in the Kunar Province, Afghanistan. During their movement an armed Taliban enemy attacked with heavy volumes of RPT, machine gun, and small arms fire from 200 meters away on an elevated fighting position. 3/C took three casualties and a MEDEVAC request was called. Staff Sergeant Emmett Spraktes was the Flight Medic for Dustoff 24. He risked his life by volunteering to be lowered through effective enemy fire to the dismounted patrol's casualty collection point (CCP). While on the ground, Staff Sergeant Spraktes treated and prepared three casualties for hoist, all while receiving persistent small arms and automatic weapons fire from approximately 150 meters away. Staff Sergeant Spraktes prepared and hoisted one urgent surgical casualty while remaining on the ground with the patrol to assess the remaining casualties. When the aircraft returned for a second hoist, Staff Sergeant Spraktes attached himself and two other priority casualties to the jungle penetrator. The aircraft attempted to bring the casualties up but the hoist did not have the power to lift the weight. With complete disregard for his own life, while still under effective enemy fire, Staff Sergeant Spraktes selflessly asked to be lowered back to the ground, unhooked himself from the jungle penetrator, and allowed the priority casualties to be evacuated. While on the ground waiting for the aircraft to return, Staff Sergeant Spraktes worked with the platoon medic to check each of 3/C's Soldiers and determined that two other Soldiers would need to be medically evacuated due to heat exhaustion. Continuously refusing to leave the remaining patients, Staff Sergeant Spraktes returned fire with his M4 at enemy positions and passed his remaining ammunition to other Soldiers in the patrol. When the aircraft returned to the CCP, Staff Sergeant Spraktes rigged both heat casualties for extraction and then volunteered to stay and leave the area dismounted with 3/C's patrol. Dustoff 24 made one more return trip to pick up Staff Sergeant Spraktes prior to leaving the area, but not at the medic's request. Without a doubt Staff Sergeant Spraktes single-handedly prevented the loss of Soldiers' lives. His selfless assumption of risk shifted the momentum of 3/C's fight. His courage and devotion, beyond the call of duty, directly reflects great credit upon himself, Task Force PALEHORSE, 82d Airborne Division, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Dixon, CA

SWINNEY, JAMES P.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
1/64 Armor Tank Company, 3rd Infantry Division
Date of Action: 2003
Synopsis: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant James P. Swinney, United States Army, for gallantry in action in 2003 in Iraq, while assigned as a medic with the 1/64th Armored Tank Company, 3rd Infantry Division. Sergeant Swinney's gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Department of Defense, Military Awards for Valor, US Army Silver Star recipients http://valor.defense.gov/Recipients/ArmySilverStar.aspx

TURNER, DWAYNE
Private, U. S. Army
3d Battalion, 502d Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division
Date of Action: 13 April 2004
Synopsis:
Private Dwayne Turner, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Combat Medic assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 502d Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM near Baghdad, Iraq. Private Turner provided life-saving medical care to 16 fellow soldiers on 13 April 2003 when his unit came under a grenade and small-arms attack 30 miles south of Baghdad. Private Turner and two other medics from Company A of that battalion were part of a work detail that came under attack as they unloaded supplies in a makeshift operations center. When a grenade was thrown over the wall by insurgents, the blast threw Private Turner into the vehicle, and wounded him with shrapnel. Ignoring his own injuries, Private Turner ran to the front of his vehicle and observed a soldier with eye injuries. He evacuated his comrade to a more sheltered position and with the other two medics established a triage system under the cover of a building. Private Turner then ran back outside to bring more soldiers into the makeshift clinic. In addition to the shrapnel wounds in both legs suffered in the initial attack, Private Turner was shot at least twice including one bullet wound that broke his right arm and another in his left leg while giving first aid to the soldiers. Nevertheless, he continued to give first aid and to bring soldiers in from the barrage of gunfire outside the compound until he finally collapsed against a wall from loss of blood. Private Turner's gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

*VACCARO, ANGELO J. (First Award)
Corporal, U. S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, Task Force Chosin, 10th Mountain Division
Date of Action: 5 July 2006
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Angelo J. Vaccaro, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 5 July 2006, while under intense hostile fire as the Combat Medic for 3d Platoon, Attack Company, TASK FORCE CHOSIN, Watapor Valley, Afghanistan, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. Corporal Vaccaro's courage and dedication to duty in response to the call of "Medic" were paramount as he ran into a hail of heavy enemy machine gun fire to save the lives of two wounded Soldiers. Corporal Vaccaro's selfless and heroic actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service, reflecting great credit upon himself, the Chosin Battalion, the Spartan Brigade, Combined Joint Task Force 76, the United States Central Command, and the United States Army.
Home of record: New York, New York

*VACCARO, ANGELO J. (Second Award)
Corporal, U. S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry Regiment, Task Force Chosin, 10th Mountain Division
Date of Action: 8 September 2006
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal Angelo J. Vaccaro, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 8 September 2006, while under intense hostile fire as a Rifle Platoon Medic, 3d Platoon, Company A, 1st Battalion, 32d Infantry, Task Force Chosin. His courage and dedication to duty were paramount as he ran into a hail of enemy gunfire in order to save the lives of his fallen comrades. Corporal Vaccarro's selfless and heroic actions epitomize the performance of a combat medic and were in keeping with the finest traditions of military service, reflecting great credit on himself, the Chosin Battalion, the Spartan Brigade, Combined Joint Task Force 76, the United States Central Command, and the United States Army.
Home of record: New York, New York

WARRICK, CLINTON A.
Corporal, U S. Army
2d Platoon, 300th Military Police Company
Date of Action: 18 September 2006
Synopsis:
Corporal Clinton A. Warrick, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Combat Medic with the 2d Platoon, 300th Military Police Company, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, on 18 September 2006, in Iraq. On that date U.S. military police and Iraqi policemen were conducting their usual transitional training at the Al Huria police station in Iraq. Suddenly, without warning, small-arms fire erupted from all directions. The base was under siege. Coalition forces concentrated fire on the attackers, but then a speeding pick-up truck crashed through the entrance and careened toward the center of the station. The truck detonated its 200-pound aircraft bomb, throwing Corporal Warrick several meters and knocking him unconscious. Rubble from the explosion buried him. Corporal Warrick's platoon leader saw what happened and quickly pulled him from the debris. Corporal Warrick's legs were on fire so the platoon leader used a fire extinguisher to put out the flames. When Corporal Warrick regained consciousness, he realized that he was badly burned but he also realized that if he sat in one place, he would go into shock. He requested morphine, but his medic bag was buried in the burning building. As a medic, he knew that without pain medication, his only choice to avoid slipping into shock was to stay active. So he climbed through a hole in the building to see how he could assist. With a heavy stream of fire still raining down on the station, and suffering from third-degree burns over 45 percent of his body as well as shrapnel wounds and smoke-inhalation injuries, Corporal Warrick went about the work of a medic: He assessed injured soldiers and Iraqi policemen and told the nearby support battalion what injuries they could expect. That vital information helped save the lives of seven Iraqi policemen. Corporal Warrick realized he couldn't fight off the shock much longer, so he moved to the north side of the station where he could be evacuated to the medical station himself.
Home of record: Murphysboro, Illinois

** THIS AWARD WAS UPGRADED TO A DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS IN 2019**
WATERS, GREGORY
Specialist, U.S. Army
1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Infantry Division
Date of Action: 30 July 2008
Synopsis:
Specialist Gregory Waters, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for gallantry in action while serving with the 1st Battalion, 506th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade combat Team, 101st Infantry Division, in action on 30 July 2008, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in Afghanistan. On that date, Specialist Waters, a Medical Aidman, was part of a convoy returning to Forward Operating Base Ghazni after an overnight operation. At about 1030 hours, when the convoy was 10 to 15 kilometers from the FOB, the Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicle in which he was riding and which was the lead vehicle in the convoy, was blown up by an improvised explosive device that severed the engine compartment and virtually destroyed the road. Almost immediately the stalled convoy came under fire from about 30 enemy fighters. The Soldiers in the remaining three vehicles returned fire, while maneuvering their vehicles to shelter the damaged MRAP. Sergeant First Class Randy Shorter, a Mortar Platoon Sergeant in one of the other vehicles, sprinted across 100 meters through enemy fire and pried open the back door of the MRAP, finding the four Soldiers inside wounded but alive. The gunner, Private First Class Worton, was on his back, and the .50 caliber machine gun had fallen on him, crushing the plates of his body armor and pinning him to the floor of the MRAP. Staff Sergeant Charles Porter had a broken arm and a broken nose, and Private first Class Paul Wind, the driver, had a severe back injury. Specialist Waters had suffered a concussion and head laceration. All of the wounded had trouble breathing in the smoky truck. While the wounded fought off the enemy, Specialist Waters ignored his own wounds and assisted by Sergeant First Class Shorter, treated the wounded while waiting for MEDEVAC helicopters to arrive. When the helicopters did arrive to evacuate the wounded, Specialist Waters remained behind, not wanting to leave the remaining Soldiers without a medic as gunfire was continuing.
Home of Record: Indianapolis, Indiana
** THIS AWARD WAS UPGRADED TO A DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS IN 2019**

WILLIAMS, PATRICK C.
Captain, U.S. Army
4th Battalion, 23rd Infantry Regiment
Date of Action: 31 August 2005
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Patrick Charles Williams, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity as a Physician's Assistant on 31 August 2005, during military operations in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. After spending just twenty-four hours on the ground prior to the combat reconnaissance patrol, CPT Patrick Williams volunteered to accompany Soldiers from HHC 1-5 Infantry. With very little time to acclimatize, CPT Patrick Williams immediately chose to take part in the combat patrol and provide additional medical support. This decision would directly result in saving SSG ________ ________’s life. On August 31, 2005, the reconnaissance platoon from 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment conducted an electronic reconnaissance patrol in the Intersar neighborhood in Mosul. During the patrol, the platoon leader, Lt _____ _____ received intelligence that a High Value Target (HVT) was in battalion area of operations. Upon locating the possible target house, the platoon, as well as CPT Patrick Williams dismounted to cordon off the objective area. As the platoon moved toward the entrance of the building, two AIF tossed grenades down the stairway at the squad entering the house. Simultaneously, SSG ______’s squad was hit by automatic PKC fire from an elevated position causing life threatening wounds to SSG _____’s pectoral muscle and shoulder. Upon hearing the calls for help, CPT Williams moved to the entrance of the courtyard and immediately administered first aid. While treating SSG _______, CPT Williams and the rescue team were again engaged by the enemy with light machine gun weapons that impacted within a few feet of the rescue. CPT Williams immediately covered SSG ________’s body to shield him from the incoming fire while maintaining pressure on his wound. The platoon medic was shot in the right arm during this engagement leaving CPT Williams as the only medical personnel on the objective. During his initial treatment of SSG _______, CPT Williams realized that he could not get to the artery in order to stop the bleeding. While the rescue team maintained suppressive fire, CPT Williams made a three inch incision above the wound to locate the artery. CPT William’s split second decision to make a larger incision was successful enough to allow four fingers inside which in turn stopped the bleeding. CPT Patrick Williams held the artery closed during the entire evacuation process which lasted 30 minutes. If it were not for CPT Patrick William’s quick actions, SSG _______ would have bled to death in a short amount of time due to the large volume of blood he had lost prior to being treated. During the evacuation of one litter urgent patient and one walking wounded, CPT Williams provided simultaneous medical care in the back of a Stryker on the move. While continuing to maintain pressure on SSG _______’s artery, CPT Williams barked out instructions to the team concerning the care of SPC ______ who was wounded in the arm. CPT Williams maintained pressure on the wound throughout the entire transfer from the Stryker to the operating table. The 228th CSH on call surgeon stated that if it was not for his quick thinking and innovative techniques, there was no way SSG ______ would have survived much less been able to keep his arm. CPT William’s courage under fire and quick thinking directly contributed to saving the life of SSG _______ ______. His actions truly represent the highest degree of valor and reflect great credit upon himself, the 4th Battalion 23rd Infantry Regiment and the United States Army.
General Orders: DOD Listing at www.valor.defense.gov