U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AIR MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

ARMY COMMENDATION MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

OIF/OEF, page 2, G-L

AMEDD Silver Star

Interesting Notes:
SPC Harriman battled friendly fire to provide life saving care.

SPC Lamkin exhibited exceptional medical skills as well as impressive stamina and strength in saving the lives of multiple Soldiers.

SSG Kinny displayed outstanding leadership during a daring Medevac hoist rescue.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

GIASULLO , JOHN, JR.
Specialist, U.S. Army
Troop C, 1st Squadron, 1st Battalion, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), has awarded the Silver Star to Specialist John Giasullo, Jr., United States Army, Troop C, 1st Squadron, 1st Battalion, 61st Cavalry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division. For Gallantry: in action on 7 July 2008, while serving as a Dismounted Reconnaissance Line Medic during a combat patrol in the vicinity of Shebak Kheyl, Afghanistan, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. After a convoy vehicle was struck by an improvised explosive device during an enemy ambush, Specialist Giasullo immediately moved down into the river bed where the destroyed vehicle lay while the rest of the convoy attempted to move out of the kill zone. Once at the vehicle, he began to treat casualties and return fire as enemy small arms fire impacted all around him. Even after a secondary improvised explosive device struck the position, Specialist Giasullo continued to provide emergency medical aid and prepare the wounded Afghan National Army soldiers for evacuation. Refusing medical treatment for his own injuries after another medic arrived at the site, he successfully stabilized the casualties, loaded them onto an emergency medical transport vehicle, and then opted to rejoin his platoon until the mission was complete. His selflessness, dedication to duty, and courage under enemy fire saved the lives of four Afghan National Army soldiers and serve as an example for all Soldiers to follow. Specialist Giasullo's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 4th Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Billerika, MA

HARRIMAN, ANDREW SCOTT
SPC, U.S. Army
Troop C, 5th Squadron, 73d Cavalry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 5 March 2007
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Andrew Scott Harriman, United States Army, for gallantry in action as R & S Medic with Troop C, 5th Squadron, 73d Cavalry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division, while under intense machine gun fire, by providing life saving medical care to a fellow Paratrooper on 5 March 2007, during Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Specialist Andrew S. Harriman distinguished himself through his gallantry in combat as a Platoon Medic. Specialist Harriman was moving dismounted with an R & S team from 1st Platoon, B Troop, in an extremely hostile area of the Diyala River Valley, in order to conduct Omni-Sense emplacement and reconnaissance of As Sadah. Enemy insurgents were dug in with machine gun positions, pre-positioned IED's on their exfiltration routes and mannequins in the windows of the village to appear as if the buildings were occupied. The R & S team began their movement from the Iraqi Army compound in Al Abarrah. Specialist Harriman and the R & S team were infiltrating south along Route Canal in a staggered column when they came under intense machine gun fire from the Iraqi Police Station on the north side of the canal adjacent to their position. The R & S team quickly sought cover. One of the soldiers moved to a mound of dirt on the road for cover, but before he could take cover he was shot multiple times through his buttocks, scrotum, and legs. Both of his femoral arteries were severed causing life-threatening bleeding. Sergeant Cole and Sergeant Grimsley attempted to move to the wounded Private First Class' location and provide aid but both were pinned down by the accurate, intensifying machine gun fire. Specialist Harriman, without orders and without regard for his own safety, moved in the open over 100 feet under a hail of machine gun fire to reach the wounded Private First Class. Rounds were striking his body armor and medical bag as he moved yet he courageously pressed on. Multiple rounds hit his aid bag destroying much of his medical supplies. Specialist Harriman treated the wounded man while lying prone, emplacing two tourniquets high on his legs and initiating a Fast-1 IV through the wounded man's sternum, all while under intense direct fire. The Quick Reaction Force arrived from the north causing the Iraqi Police to cease fire when they realized they had been firing on coalition forces. Once the firing stopped, the R & S team and the QRF quickly moved back to the Iraqi Army compound and established the Helicopter Landing Zone for MEDEVAC. Specialist Harriman's heroic actions and resolve under fire were directly responsible for saving the life of a fellow Paratrooper. His courage under fire is in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflects distinct credit upon himself, the 3d Heavy Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Task Force HEADHUNTER, the 82d Airborne Division, and the United States Army.
Home of record: Largo, Florida

HARRISON, JIMMY E.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
2nd Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment
Date of Action: 6 April 2003
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Jimmy E. Harrison, United States Army, for gallantry and heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force in Iraq while in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Staff Sergeant Harrison distinguished himself while serving as the Medical Platoon Sergeant for the 2D Battalion, 69th Armor Regiment. On 6 April 2003, the enemy ambushed elements of the Task Force combat trains with rocket propelled grenades and machine gun fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, he exposed himself to continuous enemy machine gun fire at least four times to provide medical care and evacuate a wounded Soldier. Staff Sergeant Harrison left a covered position, ran across a street under heavy machine gun fire and gave aid to a wounded Soldier. He exposed himself again to the machine gun fire while evacuating the wounded Soldier to a secure area for further care. Staff Sergeant Harrison’s personal bravery and dedication to his fellow Soldiers is in keeping with the highest traditions of Military Service and the American Combat Medic. His actions under fire reflect great credit upon himself, the 3D Infantry Division and the United States Army.

*KIM, SHIN W.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 2nd BCT, 2nd Infantry Division
Date of Action: 28 June 2007
Synopsis, Citation Needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Shin W. Kim, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 2nd BCT, 2nd Infantry Division in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, on 28 June 2007. On that date, a platoon was struck by a deep buried IED and ambushed in the aftermath. Casualties were being pulled into a courtyard where Kim the medic was doing his best to save these men. As he worked the insurgents started lobbing grenades into the courtyard from other rooftops. One grenade landed just feet from Kim as he worked on the platoon sergeant. Kim laid between himself and the platoon sergeant taking the blast and saving the platoon sergeant. SGT Kim’s personal bravery and dedication to his fellow Soldiers is in keeping with the highest traditions of Military Service and the Army Combat Medic.  His actions reflect great credit upon himself, the 2nd Infantry Division and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Fullerton, CA

KINNEY, MATTHEW S.
SSG, U.S. Army
6th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment
Date of Action: 16 October 2008
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Matthew S. Kinney, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 6th Battalion, 101st Aviation Regiment, attached to 2d Squadron, 17th Cavalry Regiment, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, on 16 October 2008. Staff Sergeant Matthew S. Kinney, United States Army, distinguished himself through exceptionally heroic conduct on 16 October 2008, during a daring Medevac hoist rescue in the forbidding Korengal Valley of Afghanistan. His actions not only reflect the highest credit upon himself and his unit, but saved the lives of eight critically wounded U.S. and Afghan Soldiers and an entire Medevac crew. Departing in response to an urgent Medevac request emanating from the Korengal Valley, Staff Sergeant Kinney configured himself and his aircraft for hoist operations while en route. He then advised both Dustoff crews to hoist down their medics simultaneously in order to expedite the packaging and loading of the reported four casualties. Upon arriving, the pilots of both Medevac aircraft heeded Staff Sergeant Kinney's advice, lowering both flight medics into the small mountain village. On the ground, Staff Sergeant Kinney quickly took charge of a chaotic situation. Staff Sergeant Kinney discovered six urgent casualties crammed into a small mud and rock building in which several other Soldiers were taking cover. He immediately ordered all non-wounded Soldiers to pull security outside and began assessing the critically wounded. He directed the other flight medic to assist him in stabilizing the most critical patient and simultaneously directed a ground Soldier to pull the Skedco litter from its bag and prepare it for the casualty. After the patient was packaged, Staff Sergeant Kinney directed the Soldier to drag that patient outside to make more room in the small stone confinement. As he began stabilizing and packaging the second critical casualty, Staff Sergeant Kinney ordered the other flight medic to prepare to hoist up the first patient. During the second hoist iteration, the aircraft and the small building came under heavy effective machine gun fire. Despite rounds cracking overhead and impacting in the terrain around him, Staff Sergeant Kinney helped his fellow medic complete the hoist, while attempting to locate the origin of the enemy ambush. Staff Sergeant Kinney discovered that the fire was coming from a ridgeline immediately to the north of his location, opposite of where the Apache aircraft were engaging. He contacted the Apache gunships over his MBITR radio and began redirecting rocket and 30-mm. gun runs onto the heavy machine gun location, effectively suppressing the fire. The hovering Medevac aircraft had already taken two direct hits while inside the ambush kill zone. If not for Staff Sergeant Kinney's instinctive action the entire crew and two patients onboard would have undoubtedly been lost. As the Apache aircraft continued to suppress, Staff Sergeant Kinney finished packaging his third critical patient and began to assess and treat the remaining three patients, who suffered from multiple shrapnel and gunshot wounds. As his fellow medic departed up the hoist, Staff Sergeant Kinney immediately began preparing the third Skedco Extraction Litter. Staff Sergeant Kinney discovered that several of the required hoist straps were missing. Without hesitation, he procured a rope and began using it to prepare a harness that would secure the patient's Skedco to the hoist hook. Staff Sergeant Kinney now moved his three remaining patients to cover as he radioed his Medevac aircraft, requesting extraction. As the firefight continued around him, the pinned down squad took an additional casualty. Staff Sergeant Kinney quickly triaged this Soldier and placed him with the other three casualties awaiting hoist extraction. While waiting for his aircraft, Staff Sergeant Kinney maneuvered under fire to an adjacent building in effort to locate the enemy fighting positions and possibly relay them to the Apaches, but the fire ceased as soon as he repositioned. The Medevac aircraft hovered into position and Staff Sergeant Kinney took the first ambulatory patient into the open and secured him to the Jungle Penetrator (JP). The enemy began taking pot shots at Staff Sergeant Kinney and his patient. As soon as the patient was off the ground, Staff Sergeant Kinney scrambled back to cover and retrieved a second ambulatory casualty. As he exposed himself once again, the bullets began cracking by and impacting the wall behind him. Regardless, he secured the patient and waited until the JP was off the ground until retreating to cover. Once more, he repositioned to an overlooking building for a better vantage point, but was unable to get a fix on the sniper's location. Returning for the final litter casualty, Staff Sergeant Kinney directed two Soldiers to help him drag the Skedco litter into the clearing. Staff Sergeant Kinney began connecting his makeshift Skedco rigging to the hoist's rescue hook. With the sporadic enemy fire still kicking up dirt all around him, Staff Sergeant Kinney dutifully held the tagline for several minutes while his patient hoisted up, ensuring the litter did not spin out of control. When the cable was fully retracted Staff Sergeant Kinney realized that his makeshift harness ropes were too long and the litter still hung several feet below the aircraft. He calmly instructed the crew chief to lower the Sked and instructed the pilots to “do a lap” in order to limit their exposure to enemy fire while he sat in the open and shortened the ropes. At this time, an eighth Soldier was wounded in the leg by the sustained enemy fire. When the aircraft returned and the cable sent back down, Staff Sergeant Kinney sent the latest ambulatory casualty up on the JP after controlling his bleeding. Lastly, Staff Sergeant Kinney began his second attempt at hoisting up the makeshift Skedco, this time doing so successfully. With all five of his casualties onboard, Staff Sergeant Kinney quickly secured his gear, and checked for any additional wounded. He then rode the JP up to his aircraft. En route to the Forward Surgical Team (FST), Staff Sergeant Kinney single handedly treated five critical patients, controlling bleeding, administering pain control, dressing wounds, and starting IVs. The multi-systemic wounds Staff Sergeant Kinney treated alone in the back of his cramped aircraft included partial amputations, femoral bleeding, and multiple gunshot and shrapnel wounds. Upon landing at the Medical Treatment Facility, Staff Sergeant Kinney assisted in unloading his patients and preparing them for surgery once in the FST. Staff Sergeant Kinney's heroic actions on this day exceeded the call of duty and speak volumes to his selfless dedication to the welfare of his fellow Soldiers. On countless occasions, he demonstrated a willingness to lay down his own life for those he is sworn to protect. By calling Apache fire onto the location of an enemy heavy machine gun during an ambush, he saved the lives of countless Soldiers on the ground, as well as the lives of an entire Medevac crew who had assumed a stationary hover over the kill zone. Staff Sergeant Kinney's selfless actions under fire, his level head during a deteriorating situation, and improvisations when all was otherwise lost, reflect the highest credit upon himself, the Medevac, Task Force Out Front, and the United States Army.

KOBES, GERRIT
SPC, U.S. Army
Company B, 1st Battalion, 160th Infantry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 2 November 2004
Synopsis:
Specialist Gerrit Kobes, United States Army, was awarded the Silver Star for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 160th Infantry Regiment, 160th Infantry Division, during combat operations in support of Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, in Fallujah, Iraq, on 2 November 2004. Specialist Kobes was a Medical Aidman serving with Company B on an escort mission to ferry Iraqi soldiers to Fallujah for an upcoming operation when their convoy was attacked by insurgents firing rocket propelled grenades and small arms. A truck was quickly disabled, causing five Iraqi soldiers serious wounds. With the convoy blocked and enemy fire coming from several locations, Specialist Kobes disregarding his personal safety, moved through the convoy on foot and reached the wounded men. Under covering fire from Marines trying to secure the site, Specialist Kobes began medical treatments. By the time the convoy began moving again, he had stabilized the wounded, permitting their evacuation for further medical care. One Iraqi soldier died of his wounds, but four others were saved by the dedicated actions of Specialist Kobes. Specialist Kobes' gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home of record: Kettle Falls, Washington

LAFRENZ , MATTHEW
SGT, U.S. Army
Company A (Chalk 2), 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment
Date of Action: 3-4 March 2002
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Matthew LaFrenz, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company A, 1st Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, during combat operations in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, during the period 3 to 4 March 2002, during Operation ANACONDA, in Afghanistan. Sergeant LaFrenz's valorous actions while in direct contact with enemy forces and in the face of extreme duress during the successful rescue of Special Operators contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and to the saving of additional lives. In five separate occasions, Sergeant LaFrenz exposed himself to enemy fire while providing medical support to casualties. Sergeant LaFrenz was able to consolidate all casualties within four hours providing aid to nine casualties in an exhausting frigid environment. The gallantry displayed by Sergeant LaFrenz during 18 hours of combat is in keeping with the highest standards of valor. Through his distinctive accomplishments, Sergeant LaFrenz reflected great credit upon himself, the United States Army, and the Department of Defense.

LAMKIN, ANDREW J. A.
SPC, U.S. Army
Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 5 September 2004
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Andrew J. A. Lamkin, United States Army. Specialist Andrew Lamkin distinguished himself by his gallantry and personal courage while assigned as Combat Medic with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division on 5 September 2004 during Operation IRON FURY II. Specialist Lamkin established his platoon's Casualty Collection Point (CCP) in a building adjacent to the corner of Route BRAVO and Route MAINE, deep in Sadr City, Iraq. The platoon made contact with Mahdi Militia fighters, and a soldier was wounded in a squad on an adjacent rooftop. Without hesitating, he left his covered and concealed position and made his way toward the injured infantryman. The enemy massed their fires on him as he moved to treat the casualty in an effort to pin him down, but he continued undeterred. Noticing that two insurgent gunmen were exposed on a rooftop across the street, Specialist Lamkin halted and quickly killed them both with accurate rifle fire. Rushing to the side of the wounded soldier, Private First Class Young, he immediately assessed the casualty and began treating him for a gunshot wound to his arm. He soon realized that he could not effectively treat Private First Class Young's injury at that location due to the high volume of incoming fire. Specialist Lamkin saw a locked door that appeared to lead downstairs, and ran toward it at full speed, knocking it off its hinges. He dragged the door to the casualty and, using empty ammunition bandoliers, fashioned a makeshift litter, which he used to drag Private First Class Young to safety. Once out of direct fire contact, he stabilized Private First Class Young until his platoon could evacuate him. Less than an hour after the first casualty, another soldier was critically wounded. PV2 McCauley had been shot in the head, and needed immediate medical attention. Again, without hesitation, Specialist Lamkin ran to the side of the fallen soldier and began treating him under fire. With another soldier's help, he dragged Private McCauley to a sector of the rooftop that seemed safer and less exposed. Upon reaching it, however, Specialist Lamkin and his patient were immediately taken under heavy rifle and RPG fire from insurgent gunmen across the street. Without regard for his own safety, Specialist Lamkin used his own body as a shield, and began to stabilize his seriously wounded comrade as withering fire raked the rooftop around him. Specialist Lamkin realized that Private McCauley was unconscious and choking on his own blood. He quickly opened the casualty's airway using a "J-tube", enabling him to breathe although he was unconscious. The enemy continued to hammer the rooftop with RPG and rifle fire, but Specialist Lamkin shielded Private McCauley's body with his own. Securing the "J-tube" with 550-cord in order to move his patient, Specialist Lamkin called for the evacuation vehicle. Before he could evacuate the casualty, however, Specialist Lamkin helped carry him over a four-foot high wall, under fire, and then down three flights of stairs to the evacuation vehicle--an impressive show of stamina and strength. On the ground floor, the Bradley Fighting Vehicle tasked to evacuate Private McCauley backed up to the door. As the wounded soldier's squad placed him in the Bradley, Specialist Lamkin continued to scan for insurgent fighters. He identified two that were repositioning to interdict the MEDEVAC vehicle, and killed them both with accurate rifle fire. Specialist Lamkin demonstrated his expert marksmanship, medical skills and conspicuous gallantry; he is truly the epitome of the combat medic.

LAMOREAUX, COREY L.
SFC, U. S. Army
2d Battalion, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne)
Date of Action: 3-4 March 2002
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Corey L. Lamoreaux, United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed enemy from 3 March 2002 to 4 March 2002, while serving as a Medic on an MH-47E Helicopter of the 2d Battalion, 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne), in support of Task Force 11, engaged in combat actions during Operation ANACONDA, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM, in Afghanistan. Sergeant First Class Lamoreaux's actions under direct enemy fire were instrumental in the survival of his crew and passengers in the moments preceding and immediately following the shoot down of his aircraft and subsequent actions on the objective, and helped set the conditions for the rescue operation of United States Forces under fire. Through his distinctive accomplishments, Sergeant First Class Lamoreaux reflected great credit upon himself, the United States Army, and the Department of Defense.

*LINDSKOG, JAMESON L.
Specialist, U.S. Army
2nd Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division
Date of Action: 29 March 2011
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Jameson L. Lindskog, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity on 29 March 2011 while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 2d Battalion, 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 101st Airborne Division, while fighting against hostile enemy defenses during Operation STRONG EAGLE III, in Marawara District, Kunar Province, Afghanistan, in support of Operation ENDURING FREEDOM. Specialist Lindskog, under seemingly insurmountable conditions of the harshest extremes, was able to inspire the combined combat forces to persevere and win under conditions much more favorable to the enemy. His courage, bravery and leadership in combat set the example for all to follow. Specialist Lindskog's distinctive accomplishments are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 327th Infantry Regiment, the 1st Brigade Combat Team, the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) and the United States Army. NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY AWARD: Specialist Jameson L. Lindskog distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous conduct in the performance of outstanding service to the United States as a Platoon Medic on 29 March 2011, during Operation STRONG EAGLE III. Specialist Lindskog served as the assigned medic to third platoon, HHC, the decisive operation for Operation STRONG EAGLE III responsible for the seizure and clearance of Objective RICHMOND, the village of Barowolo Kalay, a known insurgent strong point. While maneuvering to the 80 series of qalats during the clearance phase of the operation, the lead section encountered a complex ambush from multiple directions and was pinned down in a draw. During the initial contact there were three casualties, the lead Squad Leader was shot in his back, one team leader was shot in the arm, and one ANA Soldier was seriously wounded. Specialist Lindskog was traveling in the trail element and maneuvered rapidly to reinforce the lead section in contact while receiving heavy enemy fire overhead. Specialist Lindskog at great personal risk to his life showed no hesitation and bounded to the wounded Soldiers through withering enemy fire while brush, trees, and debris were destroyed around him. Once the reinforcements reached the ambushed men, Specialist Lindskog immediately assessed the situation, evaluated casualties, and issued priorities for first aid. The team leader was ambulatory so Specialist Lindskog began treating the squad leader, checking buddy aide that had already been rendered while checking for other injures. Again disregarding his own personal safety, Specialist Lindskog packed the squad leader's wounds with Kerlix and adjusted existing pressure dressings, even as enemy fire impacted all around him. Once the secondary aide on the squad leader had been completed, Specialist Lindskog instructed others on how to care for the wounded squad leader and moved to the wounded ANA Soldier, even after another Soldier was shot twice in the front ESAPI plate just moments before at the same location. As Specialist Lindskog passed out medical equipment to help treat the wounded and began treatment on a wounded ANA Soldier, he was struck just under the left arm by an enemy round that lodged in his chest. Specialist Lindskog slumped to his side, and even though he was mortally wounded he continued to instruct his fellow Soldiers on how to treat his wounds and give care to other wounded Soldiers. Specialist Lindskog remained lucid for another thirty minutes, continuing to give instructions on how to care for others and himself until he succumbed to his wounds. At no time did Specialist Lindskog hesitate nor ask to be evacuated once severely wounded and in fact asked to stay and assist with the casualties, knowing both the severity of the situation and the wounds he received. He continued to give instructions to others to continue on site care for the wounded until he succumbed to his injuries. Specialist Lindskog's medical care and instructions stabilized one U.S. casualty and one ANA casualty until the MEDEVAC could finally arrive. Specialist Lindskog's valorous actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect great credit upon himself, the 2-327th Infantry Regiment (No Slack), the 1st Brigade Combat Team (Bastogne), Combined Joint Task Force 101, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Pleasanton, California