U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AIR MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

ARMY COMMENDATION MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

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ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

Distinguished Service Cross - Vietnam War (O-R)

AMEDD Distinguished Service Cross Recipients > AMEDD Distinguished Service Cross Recipients of the Vietnam War

Interesting Notes:
The awards on this page include one for SP5 Claude Quick Jr.  He received his award 7 June 2004 for actions he performed 19 May 1966. He received an interim Bronze Star with "V" device in 1966 and the DSC recommendation was misplaced. Following an appeal to the Army Board for the Correction of Military Records, the DSC was approved. SP5 Quick Jr. retired as a 1SG.

Specialist Fourth Class Adolph Rios Jr. recieved his award on Permanent Order 104-2d Battalion (14 April 2010) for actions he performed 19 July 1966.

This page also contains a citation for CW1 Purchase, a Helicopter Ambulance pilot who also recieved the Silver Star for action in Vietnam. Read his Silver Star citation.

Although all the DSC write-ups are exceptional, one on this page is rather unique, SGT Rose.

* Denotes Posthumous Award



O'QUINN, DONALD L.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: March 18, 1969
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Donald L. O'Quinn, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four O'Quinn distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 March 1969 as a medic during a reconnaissance-in-force mission. When Specialist O'Quinn's company was ambushed and one of the infantrymen was seriously wounded, he crossed an open area through a hail of bullets to reach the casualty. As he was administering aid, an enemy grenade landed eight feet away. Specialist O'Quinn used his body to shield the man, and was hit in the leg by shrapnel. Disregarding his painful injury, he continued to treat his comrade and then maneuvered about the battlefield to care for the other wounded. After the fighting subsided, he refused evacuation until the other casualties had been cared for and extracted. Specialist Four O'Quinn's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1629 (May 7, 1969)

ORTIZ, RAYMOND
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: November 3 & 4, 1965
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Raymond Ortiz, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. During the period 3 and 4 November 1965, Specialist Ortiz was serving as a medical corpsman accompanying the 3d platoon of Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division on a night air assault mission of a Viet Cong held zone. At approximately 2330 hours, 3 November 1965, after landing and leaving his troop carrying helicopter, Specialist Ortiz was wounded in his left arm which rendered it useless. Disregarding and refusing treatment of his painful wound, he remained with the 3d platoon during its assault on the hostile positions. As the platoon advanced to within thirty meters of the insurgent position, he continually refused to be evacuated and personally gave aid and evacuated six of his wounded comrades. Notwithstanding the murderous hail of hostile fire, he rushed to the aid of his platoon leader, who had been wounded and was lying in the line of the hostile barrage. Moving forward in this attempt Specialist Ortiz was again wounded in the chest and knocked to the ground. Although in great pain from this wound he got to his feet, continued in the valorous attempt to aid his wounded superior, and was again wounded in the chest by small arms fire. When he was picked up for evacuation he refused aid until the rest of the wounded had been evacuated. His gallantry under fire saved the lives of several of his comrades and greatly inspired the members of the platoon. Specialist Ortiz's extraordinary heroism and compassion for his fellow man were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Pacific, General Orders No. 44 (February 28, 1966)

*PEDERSON, ROGER ALLEN
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized)
Date of Action: March 29, 1971
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Roger Allen Pederson, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, 1st Brigade, 5th Infantry Division (Mechanized). Specialist Four Pederson distinguished himself as a medical aidman in support of a besieged American unit. While en route to the contact area, his convoy was ambushed by an enemy force firing rocket propelled grenades and automatic weapons. Specialist Pederson leaped from his vehicle amid intense enemy fire and raced forward to treat the wounded. With enemy rounds spraying around him, Specialist Pederson treated two wounded soldiers and dragged both to safety. Although wounded in this action, he again attempted to reach another casualty. Ignoring his own wounds, Specialist Pederson began treating the casualty's wounds when a hail of enemy bullets struck his location. Specialist Pederson shielded the soldier with his own body, sustaining additional wounds. Shortly thereafter, he succumbed to his own wounds. Specialist Four Pederson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2060 (June 14, 1971)
Home Town: Elk Mound, Wisconsin

*POLUSNEY, JAMES FRANCIS
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: November 17, 1969
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to James Francis Polusney, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. Specialist Five Polusney distinguished himself while serving as medical aidman with an infantry unit of the 1st Cavalry Division during a reconnaissance operation in Tay Ninh Province. His company was moving over flat terrain densely wooded with bamboo when the forward platoon was engaged by an estimated platoon of North Vietnamese regulars firing from trees and heavily fortified bunkers. In the initial concentration of command detonated mines and automatic weapons fire, the lead platoon of the reconnaissance force sustained numerous casualties. Although seriously wounded himself, Specialist Polusney dragged himself forward to where several comrades lay critically wounded and moved from man to man administering first aid under constant and heavy enemy fire. After saving the life of one soldier by stopping the bleeding of his severe abdominal wound and bandaging it, Specialist Polusney began crawling to another soldier who lay wounded in a small clearing. Before he reached the man, however, Specialist Polusney was hit by sniper fire from the front and left flank. Specialist Polusney nevertheless struggled on and reached his wounded comrade. While administering aid to the wounded soldier, Specialist Polusney succumbed to his own wounds. Specialist Five Polusney's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 769 (March 28, 1970)
Home Town: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

PURCHASE, STEPHEN R.
Chief Warrant Officer (WO 1), U.S. Army
159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance)
Date of Action: April 7, 1972
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Warrant Officer One (WO-1) Stephen R. Purchase, United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance). Warrant Officer Purchase distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 April 1972, while serving as the Pilot of an unarmed medical evacuation helicopter attempting to evacuate three wounded American Advisors and an ARVN (South Vietnamese Army) captain who were completely surrounded by an estimated battalion of North Vietnamese Army troops. After landing at the staging area in Song Be, Warrant Officer Purchase received a briefing during which he was informed that the enemy was in possession of numerous anti-aircraft weapons and that continuous air strikes had failed to thwart the enemy offensive. Demonstrating indomitable courage, disregard for his own safety and profound concern for his fellow soldiers, Warrant Officer Purchase volunteered to attempt a rescue even though three previous attempts that day had failed. At the rescue site the enemy troops began to make bold advances on the American position despite heavy rocket attacks by helicopter gunships. Realizing that further delay might cost the lives of the wounded, he began his approach and landed on a road in the area of the wounded soldiers. Because they could not be located, he hovered his aircraft along the road searching for them, flying in extraordinarily intense fire directed at him from all positions about the aircraft. During this time, his aircraft commander was struck and killed by enemy fire. Warrant Officer Purchase courageously piloted his aircraft from the area despite the overwhelming firepower that was not being directed against him. Warrant Officer Purchase's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1199
Home of Record: Fairbanks, Alaska

QUICK, JR., CLAUDE
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters & Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: May 19, 1966
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Claude Quick, Jr., Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action during military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Quick distinguished himself by heroic actions on 19 May, 1966 while serving as a medical aidman attached to a rifle company on a search and destroy mission when elements of the company encountered intense Viet Cong fire from automatic weapons concealed in the thick jungle foliage. As injured Americans fell, he immediately moved through the withering enemy fire to give aid. Approaching one injured man, he observed that his injury was of a nature that the man could not be moved. Completely disregarding his own personal safety, he remained by the man's side, trying vainly to revive him. Specialist Quick, though wounded himself turned his attentions elsewhere, moving to other injured soldiers, giving aid and encouragement, and directing the evacuation of the wounded. Specialist Quick is credited with saving several lives during this action. This outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and personal bravery at the risk to his own life is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Department of the Army
Home of Record: Camden, New York

*QUINN, RICHARD FLOYD
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: July 12, 1970
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Richard Floyd Quinn, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Quinn distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman during ground combat operations in Phuoc Long Province. Specialist Quinn's company had just departed its night defensive position and was advancing down a narrow jungle trail when the allied lead element contacted an enemy force of unknown size. several allied casualties were sustained in the initial fighting and Specialist Quinn immediately moved forward to treat the casualties. Ignoring the intense enemy fire that swept the area, he moved from one position to another to treat the wounded allies and assist them to positions of relative safety. When a series of incoming enemy rockets exploded to Specialist Quinn's front, he immediately went to the aid of two seriously wounded soldiers. Although exposed in a forward position, the specialist skillfully administered aid to his comrades. As he prepared to evacuate them to rear positions, he was mortally wounded by the hostile fire. Specialist Four Quinn's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4973 (October 29, 1970)
Home Town: Woodstock, New York

*RAY, WILLIAM DAVID
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: November 27, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to William David Ray, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Ray distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 November 1968 as a medic during a combat air assault in the vicinity of Tay Ninh. As Private Ray's company landed in knee-high grass in a flat, open area close to an enemy base camp, it came under intense machine gun, automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire from well-concealed bunkers in a nearby hedgerow. Despite the vicious enemy fire, Private Ray immediately left his covered position and crawled to his comrades who had been wounded. After treating several casualties, he began to call to the injured who were hidden by the tall grass to show their locations by shouting or firing smoke grenades. Although the movement of the grass indicated his position to the communists, he continued to render aid and encouragement, treating four more wounded men. While fearlessly exposing himself to care for his fellow soldiers, he was mortally wounded by the hostile fusillade. Private First Class Ray's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 660 (February 25, 1969)
Home Town: El Centro, California

RIOS, JR., ADOLPH
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 19 July 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross to Specialist Fourth Class Adolph Rios, Jr. (ASN: 16779854), United States Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving with Company A, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in combat operations in the vicinity of the Ho Bo Woods, Republic of Vietnam on 19 July 1966. That afternoon, Specialist Fourth Class Rios and his platoon were transported to the Ho Bo Woods in order to execute a search and destroy action. Within minutes of their heliborne landing, the unit suffered its first casualty as a result of heavy enemy sniper and mortar fire. With total disregard for his own safety, Specialist Fourth Class Rios administered first aid to the seriously wounded man and then carried him through withering enemy fire to join the remainder of the platoon. Soon after, a squad leader was hit through the collarbone and fell in an exposed area. With utter disregard for his own safety, Specialist Fourth Class Rios ran through a deadly hail of bullets and, while still exposed, began to administer first aid before carrying the squad leader to the safety of a rice paddy dike. Throughout the fight, Specialist Fourth Class Rios repeatedly exposed himself to enemy fire in order to aid his wounded comrades. At one point, Specialist Fourth Class Rios was exposed from the waist up for almost five minutes as he attempted to revive a fallen comrade. When the men were finally extracted by helicopter, Specialist Fourth Class Rios stopped to assist a wounded man onto the helicopter and was seriously wounded himself. Unfazed, he assisted the man aboard and treated his wounds. Specialist Fourth Class Rios' professional competency, devotion to duty, and steadfast courage are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order 104-2d Battalion 14 April 2010

RIOS, RICARDO L.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: December 7, 1969
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Ricardo L. Rios, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 3d Battalion, 12th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Rios distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1969 while serving as a medical aidman on a combat operation in Kontum Province. As the point element of Specialist Rios' platoon was nearing a small stream bed, a well-concealed enemy force initiated contact with small arms and light machine gun fire. Specialist Rios discovered that the point man was wounded and rushed from the rear to his aid. En route, he was seriously wounded in the arm by sniper fire, but he stubbornly moved forward, braving the intense enemy fire to treat the injured man. Threading his way back through enemy fire, he treated two other wounded platoon members. Meanwhile, the point man was wounded again and lapsed into unconsciousness. Specialist Rios moved forward, and although the constant target of enemy snipers, pulled the point man to the safety of nearby concealment. Shortly thereafter, the wounded machine gunner called for a re-supply of ammunition. Specialist Rios responded by making three trips with ammunition from the rear to the machine gunner's position. On the fourth trip, Specialist Rio's wounds no longer allowed him to continue and he fell unconscious. Specialist Four Rios' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2009 (June 23, 1970)

ROSE, GARY M.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
C &C (Central), Task Force 1, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces
Date of Action: September 11 - 14, 1970
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Gary M. Rose, Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving as a medical aidman with a company-size exploitation force, Command and Control (Central), Task Force 1, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. On 12 September 1970, his company was engaged by a well armed hostile force. Enemy B-40 rockets and mortar rounds rained while the foe sprayed the area with small arms, automatic weapons, and machine gun fire, wounding many and forcing everyone to seek cover. One ally, was unable to reach protective shelter due to his weakened condition. Sergeant Rose, braving the bullet-infested fire zone, sprinted fifty meters to his downed comrade's side. The sergeant then used his own body to protect the casualty from further injury while treating his wounds. After stopping the blood flow from the wound, Sergeant Rose carried the man back through the bullet-ridden zone to protective cover. As the belligerents accelerated their attack, Sergeant Rose continued to disregard his own safety as he ran from casualty to casualty, administering emergency first aid. Suddenly, a B-40 rocket impacted just meters from Sergeant Rose, knocking him from his feet and inflicting wounds throughout his body. Ignoring his own pain, Sergeant Rose struggled to his feet and continued to administer medical treatment to the other injured soldiers. As night approached, the order was given to dig defensive slit trenches. Sergeant Rose, his own wounds yet untreated, worked tirelessly to excavate many trenches for the severely injured who were unable to dig their own, stopping only when all the casualties had been placed in safe positions. All through the night and into the next day, the foe pounded the allied force with a continuous barrage of B-40 rockets and mortars. Despite the deadly volleys falling around him, Sergeant Rose displayed a calm professionalism as he administered medical treatment to countless men; two were so severely wounded that they would have died without the sergeant's vigilant care. Finally, on 14 September, the company was successfully extracted from the embattled area by helicopter support ships. Sergeant Rose, though tired and wounded, refused evacuation until all other casualties were safely out of the area.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 143 (January 1, 1971)