U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AIR MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

ARMY COMMENDATION MEDAL WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

Distinguished Flying Cross

* Interesting Notes:

Captain Patrick H. Brady, on a subsequent tour in Vietnam, would earn the Distinguished Service Cross and the Medal of Honor in addition to his Distinguished Flying Cross

Major James A. Eberwine also earned the Silver Star and Bronze Star with "V" device while in Vietnam

First Lieutenant Jerome V. Foust earned the Silver Star twice in addition to his Distinguished Flying Cross.

In addition to his Distinguished Flying Cross, First Lieutenant Ronald A. Huether earned the Silver Star during his time in Vietnam

Specialist Four James C. Kearney also earned the ARCOM with “V” device and the Air Medal with “V” device.

First Lieutenant Aleda E. Lutz, Army Nurse Corps, was the second woman to receive the Distinguished Flying Cross after Amelia Earhart.

In addition to his two Distinguished Flying Cross awards, Major Douglas E. Moore also earned the Distinguished Service Cross while in Vietnam.

First Lieutenant Christopher M. Siedor, Medical Service Corps, also earned the Silver Star in Vietnam.

CW2 George I. Vadelnieks earned the Distinguished Flying Cross twice.

First Lieutenant Thomas Robert White earned his DFC as part of the Doolittle Raider Force. He also earned the Silver Star.

* Indicates Posthumous Award

BLOOMQUIST, PAUL A.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 21 June 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism while participating in aerial flight is awarded by the Department of the Army to Captain Paul A. Bloomquist, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 June 1964. As an Aircraft Commander of a helicopter ambulance, Captain Bloomquist displayed perseverance, fortitude, and professional skill while participating in an aerial medical mission to evacuate several wounded Vietnamese troops from the scene of a vicious battle with the Viet Cong. Although his helicopter was struck by enemy gunfire which wounded him, he ignored his own injury and succeeded in landing the helicopter ambulance in the middle of the battlefield. Despite exposure to multiple weapons fire, he bravely remained in this position to assist in the treatment and loading of the wounded. For thirteen hours and into the darkness of night, he repeatedly landed the helicopter in the combat zone to rescue the wounded, administer treatment, and evacuate the casualties. Throughout the hazardous situation, he demonstrated sound judgment, indomitable courage, and dedicated devotion to duty. Captain Bloomquist’s heroic conduct and outstanding flying ability are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 15, Department of the Army, 28 April 1965

BRADY, PATRICK H.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
57th Helicopter Detachment
Date of Action: 21 June 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism while participating in aerial flight is awarded by the Department of the Army to Captain Patrick H. Brady, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 June 1964. As a pilot of a helicopter ambulance, Captain Brady displayed professional skill, fortitude, and determination while participating in an aerial medical mission to evacuate several wounded Vietnamese troops from the scene of a vicious battle with the Viet Cong. Although his helicopter was struck by enemy gunfire which wounded the Aircraft Commander, Captain Brady succeeded in landing the helicopter ambulance in the middle of the battlefield. Despite exposure to multiple weapons fire, he bravely remained in this position to assist in the treatment and loading of the wounded. For thirteen hours and into the darkness of night, he repeatedly landed the helicopter in the combat zone to rescue the wounded, administer treatment, and evacuate the casualties. Throughout the hazardous situation, he demonstrated sound judgment, indomitable courage, and dedicated devotion to duty. Captain Brady’s heroic conduct and outstanding flying ability are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect distinct credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 15, Department of the Army, 28 April 1965

BRINGLOE, JULIA A.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
C Company, 3d Battalion, 10th Aviation Regiment,
Date of Action: 25 – 27 June 2011
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to Sergeant Julia A. Bringloe, United States Army, Sergeant Julia Bringloe distinguished herself by conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in the face of the enemy of the United States as an Air Ambulance Flight Medic with Charlie Company, Task force Phoenix, FOB Fenty, from 25 June to 27 June 2011 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) XI. During Operation HAMMER DOWN, Sergeant Bringloe and her crew of Dustoff 73 provided direct medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) support to Task Force BRONCO in Afghanistan's forbidding Watahpor Valley. Throughout the multi-day operation, Sergeant Bringloe repeatedly faced a disciplined enemy determined to engage her and her crew in the most extreme, high altitude mountain environment in order to conduct lifesaving evacuations of 11 Soldiers. No matter how minor or severe the injury, each casualty was absolutely debilitating to the freedom of maneuver of the Task Force Bronco Soldiers, making them a stationary target to a lethal enemy. Sergeant Bringloe and her Dustoff crew were the only assets which could overcome these challenges to extract the wounded soldiers. She constantly exposed herself to enemy fire by guiding her medical aircraft into the most confined spaces conducting one-wheel landings on qalat roof tops, or by riding the extremely vulnerable hoist to her patients below from hover altitudes as high as 150 feet. At one location where there were several wounded soldiers located inside a qalat, her sister ship Dustoff 72 received such heavy enemy fire in attempting to evacuate, that they were forced to return to FOB Fenty for an emergency landing due to a critical loss in hydraulic components. This did not stop Sergeant Bringloe or her crew from pressing on to retrieve the wounded soldiers from the qatar. Using the cover of darkness and suppression fires from overhead Apache support and the troops on the ground, she was able to expertly guide her crew onto the roof top surrounded by trees to evacuate three wounded soldiers. With an extremely dark, no moon night, they received constant fire from the surrounding enemy shooting to the sound of their hovering aircraft. During this tremendously demanding maneuver, the Apache aircraft provided continuous suppression fires within 100 meters of their location. Once the wounded were on board, Sergeant Bringloe immediately began treatment of the soldiers while they rushed them to FOB Wright. One of the soldiers had received a life threatening gunshot wound to his face. Without the crew's daring rescue or Sergeant Bringloe's medical treatment en route to the Forward Surgical Team, the Soldier would not have survived much longer on the mountain. Sergeant Bringloe later found herself returning to the same qalat to retrieve an Afghan soldier who had been killed in action. At this point, the ground element had been stuck in the same location for almost 48 hours due to the constant enemy fire and casualties they had received. Due to the extremely confined area, Sergeant Bringloe and her crew decided to hoist the Afghan Hero out. She again exposed herself to the enemy while riding the hoist, lowering to the embattled qalat and packaging the fallen soldier into a Skedco. Once ready, she remained out in the open manning the tag line ensuring the Afghan Hero made it up to the hovering aircraft while the ground forces provided security. With the fallen Soldier on board, her crew immediately returned the jungle penetrator (JP) to her for her own extraction. As soon as she began securing herself to the JP, the encircled enemy opened fire on her with a fierce determination to take her out. Despite the chaos around her, she didn't hesitate in her job, securing herself and instructing her crew to continue with her own extraction, ultimately hoisting her away giving the ground forces the freedom to move and engage the surrounding enemy. In her final mission of Operation HAMMER DOWN, Sergeant Bringloe and her crew faced inclimate weather to extract a soldier suffering from a shrapnel wound that had become infected. In addition to the casualty, the unit on the ground was critically low on food, water, and medical supplies. With cloud cover coming in all around the mountain location at 10,000 feet, she and her crew were able to navigate into the area and begin another hoist operation. Once again, she fearlessly lowered herself to the ground despite the dangerous weather situation. While she readied the patient for extraction, her crew chief lowered the vital supplies to the waiting troops below. When she was ready and secure, Sergeant Bringloe looked up and saw the clouds slowly engulfing her aircraft above. She immediately signaled her crew chief to begin raising the hoist to get them away from the ground. While Sergeant Bringloe and her patient were still 10 feet below the aircraft on the hoist line, the Dustoff aircraft was finally swallowed by the cloud cover and the crew committed to instrument flight as the crew chief continued to cable Sergeant Bringloe and her patient up, ultimately getting them safely into the aircraft. The crew successfully conducted inadvertent IMC procedures despite the surrounding mountain terrain. They eventually broke out of the clouds and were able to recover to FOB Wright, delivering the patient to much needed higher care. Throughout Operation HAMMER DOWN, Sergeant Bringloe and her Dustoff crew conducted continuous turns into the Watahpor Valley, evacuating a total of 11 wounded American Soldiers. Despite an unwavering and lethal enemy, challenging night operations in confined areas, and a constant deteriorating weather situation, she provided desperately needed food, water, and medical re-supply and extracted two Afghan soldiers killed in action (KIA). Her determination to perform in such exhausting conditions over three days was nothing short of remarkable. These contributions gave the ground force commanders freedom of maneuver which unquestionably contributed to the overwhelming success of the command's mission. Sergeant Bringloe's heroic actions were a critical part in the success of Task Force BRONCO and Operation HAMMER DOWN. As a result of her abilities as an Air Ambulance Flight Medic and courageous disregard for her own safety, Sergeant Bringloe demonstrated her superior skills and bravery as a flight medic few others could replicate, all while under the most extreme of situations. Her selfless courage demonstrated by putting the lives of others above her own are beyond reproach. Sergeant Bringloe's actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon herself, this Command, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 099-105

BROWN, TRAVIS W.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
5th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment
Date of Action: 2 April 2010
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, has awarded The Distinguished Flying Cross to Staff Sergeant Travis W. Brown, Task Force Ready, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 2 April 2010. Staff Sergeant Brown was a member of an Army medical evacuation unit that on 2 April 2010 went to the aid of 11 German soldiers heavily wounded as a result of an ambush by Taliban forces. The helicopter was under heavy enemy fire for most of the rescue operation, and Staff Sergeant Brown’s life was in danger. The crew made at least two landings and the rapid evacuation of the injured Soldiers undoubtedly saved many of their lives. His devotion to his duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on himself and the Army Medical Department.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 138-006

COLLIER, CRAIG B.
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
United States Army Medical Department, Student Detachment, Academy of Health Sciences
Date of Action: 17 November 1968
Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross for extraordinary heroism while participating in aerial flight is awarded by the Department of the Army to Major Craig B. Collier, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, United States Army Medical Department, Student Detachment, Academy of Health Sciences. This award is authorized under the provisions of paragraph 1-13, AR 672-5-1. His devotion to his duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit on himself and the Army Medical Department.
General Orders: General Order number 22, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 26 November 1976

CONNELLY, MICHAEL K.
Captain, U.S. Army
5th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, Task Force Ready
Date of Action: 25 May 2010
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, has awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross to Captain Michael K. Connelly, United States Army, 5th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, Task Force Ready, for heroism while participating in aerial flight 25 May 2010 as a UH-60 Medevac Pilot and Team Leader in support of Operation Enduring Freedom 10. His selflessness, courage and leadership in the line of intense enemy fire saved the lives of all Soldiers involved. Captain Connelly’s actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect distinct credit upon himself, 5th Battalion, 158th Aviation Regiment, Task Force Ready and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order 273-08, U.S. Army Human Resources Command, 30 September 2014 

NARRATIVE TO ACCOMPANY THE AWARD OF THE DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

Captain Michael K. Connelly, United States Army, heroically distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous conduct in the face of the enemy of the United States as a UH-60 MEDEVAC Pilot and Team Leader, for C Company, 5th Battalion, 158th Regiment, Task force Destiny, on 25 May 2010, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom 10. CPT Connelly demonstrated exemplary heroism and courage in the line of fire in response to an Urgent MEDEVAC from Special Operations Task Force-81 where an American combat reconnaissance patrol was ambushed by over 50 enemy insurgents in the village of Mullah Wazir near Bala Morghab, Afghanistan. At 1021, CPT Connelly was alerted that there were wounded Soldiers on the battlefield that were in critical condition. As the Site Team Leader, he directed his crews to their aircraft to begin running up as he gathered more detailed information on the situation. He learned that Soldiers were engaged deep within enemy territory, cut off from friendly lines and were out of water and desperately low on ammunition. He was also aware that they were completely surrounded and outnumbered by a highly determined and motivated group of Taliban insurgents that were laying down accurate suppressive fires on their position. Knowing that the ground unit was almost out of water and ammunition, CPT Connelly contacted the Pilot-in-Command (PC) of Black Magic 15 (BM 15) to ensure his aircrew was loading the combat resupply package that he coordinated for prior to mission execution. CPT Connelly ran to the aircraft, assumed his role as the co-pilot and notified both the PC of BM 15 and DUSTOFF 69 (DO 69) of the increasing enemy activity and that there were multiple known reinforced machine gun positions engaging Snake Eyes 1313 (SE 1313) from the south and the west. The intensity of the insurgent’s fire prevented SE 13 from providing a detailed enemy situation report as they lacked freedom of maneuver. This information did not deter CPT Connelly as he freely accepted the mission and ordered his crews to launch. Moments later, the crew of DO 69 and BM 15 were en route to evacuate one Afghanistan National Army Soldier and one US Operational Detachment Alpha (ODA) Soldier. While departing FOB Todd, the ODA JTAC (JAG 10) was calling in a GBU-31 2000lb JDAM in danger close proximity to the compound that Snake Eyes 1313 (SE 13) was pinned down in. The situation on the ground was significantly deteriorating and DO 69 and BM 15 were racing to the engagement to divert the enemies focus and provide a standoff to SE 13. As they approached the LZ, CPT Connelly made contact with SE 13 and informed them that they were inbound to evacuate the wounded Soldiers. SE 13 notified him that they were currently being suppressed by enemy fire and would mark the LZ with green smoke. He instructed his crews to fly directly over the enemy line in hopes of drawing the enemy fire away from SE 13 and to reveal the insurgent fighting positions. CPT Connelly noticed that green smoke was on the LZ and directed his PC to land as close to the compound as possible. His PC quickly and skillfully landed their aircraft while under a barrage of enemy fire. As DO 69 touched down on the LZ, machine gun fire erupted along the right side of the aircraft, completely pinning down SE 13 within the compound located just 50m from their position with the wounded Soldiers. CPT Connelly instructed his crew to dismount their aircraft to assess the situation and provide aircraft security. CPT Connelly’s position in the right pilot seat provided him with a clear view of the compound as enemy machine guns were laying down heavy and accurate fires on the LZ, successfully pinning SE 13 inside. One patient was able to make his way to the aircraft as enemy rounds impacted the ground all around the crew of D0 69. After getting one patient safely on board, CPT Connelly motioned to his flight medic to download the water as SE 13 informed him  they were taking extremely heavy fire and were still unable to maneuver with the second litter patient. The DO 69 crew threw the desperately needed water resupply onto the LZ as CPT Connelly directed BM 15 to lay down overhead suppressive fires on the enemy in hopes of covering their movement. The intensity of the fire on the LZ was preventing the litter team from making it to DO 69; however, CPT Connelly remained focused on his mission, courageously refusing to leave the LZ until he had their wounded while relaying suspected enemy positions to BM 15. After three minutes of braving intense enemy fire on the LZ, all patients were finally on board DO 69. CPT Connelly notified BM 15 that they needed to land directly behind his aircraft to drop the combat resupply package as SE 13 was down to their last remaining rounds of ammunition and the enemy was already attempting to overrun their compound. As BM 15 began their approach, CPT Connelly instructed DO 69 to depart to the west to again draw the enemy’s fire away from SE 13 and BM 15 as they were on the LZ conducting their combat resupply. When BM 15 completed their mission, they linked up with DO 69 and departed for the FOB Todd Forward Surgical Team. CPT Connelly and his team willingly flew into heavy fire risking their lives to evacuate wounded Soldiers and bring desperately needed supplies to units that were cut off from friendly lines. His courageous actions saved the lives of all Special Operations forces pinned down on the compound and helped turn the tide of the battle. CPT Connelly demonstrated extraordinary dedication and superb leadership under fire during a complex and dangerous mission, contributing to a significant victory for the Special Operations Task force that captured key ground in the Baghdis province of Afghanistan. CPT Connelly’s actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military heroism and reflect distinct credit upon him, Task force Ready, Task force Destiny, United States Forces-Afghanistan, and the United States Army.

EBERWINE, JAMES A.
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
82nd Medical Detachment (Hel Amb), 1st Logistical Command
Date of Action: 27 October 1966
Citation:
By direction of the President of the United States of America, under provisions of the Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926 and Message 16695, HQ USARV 1 July 1966, Subject: “Further Delegation of Award Authority”. For heroism while participating in aerial flight: Major James A. Eberwine distinguished himself by heroic action on 27 October 1966 in the Republic of Vietnam while serving as pilot of an aeromedical evacuation helicopter, when severe enemy contact was made during an airmobile operation resulting in the need for the immediate evacuation of many seriously wounded ARVN soldiers. Major Eberwine piloted his helicopter in a high performance, low level field approach to the smoke marked patient pickup site, terminating with a left pedal flare placing the tail of his aircraft to the enemy fire. While mortar rounds exploded around the aircraft, he skillfully hovered the aircraft in the water and monitored the engine instruments while supervising the patient loading. With the patient safely on board, Major Eberwine performed a high performance, low level departure to medical facilities at Soc Trang. Major Eberwine returned to the area three more times, skillfully piloting his Dustoff aircraft in high performance, low level approaches into the same pickup site, although each time it was enveloped in small arms and mortar explosions. Major Eberwine’s exemplary flying judgment, daring courage, devotion to duty, and determination under fire resulted in the successful evacuation of twenty-seven seriously wounded soldiers to medical facilities at Soc Trang. His heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 257, Headquarters, 1st Logistical Command, 25 March 1967

FOUST, JEROME V.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
54th Medical Detachment, 74th Medical Battalion, 67th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 2 October 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross is presented to First Lieutenant Jerome V. Foust, Medical Service Corps. For heroism, while participating in aerial flight, evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam: First Lieutenant Foust distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 October 1967 as co-pilot of an ambulance helicopter on a medical evacuation mission near Tam Ky. He received word that an American infantry unit had come under a vicious attack from an unknown sized North Vietnamese Army force and had suffered heavy casualties. Despite severe weather conditions, he unhesitatingly prepared his aircraft and crew for the rescue mission. During flight, he maintained the ship’s instrument course. Due to thick fog, he and the pilot experienced temporary episodes of blindness and disrupted fields of vision which necessitated a continuous exchange of the helicopter’s controls between them as it descended into landing zones through heavy winds. On the second extraction, the helicopter came under intense enemy automatic weapons fire. With Lieutenant Foust’s assistance, the aircraft commander was able to successfully evade the barrage and fly the casualties to the hospital for treatment. First Lieutenant Foust’s outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 3858, Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam, 7 August 1968

HAWKINS, MARY LOUISE
First Lieutenant, Army Nurse Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 24 September 1944
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926, For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as flight nurse of a C-47 type aircraft, the Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to First Lieutenant Mary Louise Hawkins, Army Nurse Corps. On Sept. 24, 1944, 1LT Mary Louise Hawkins was evacuating 24 patients from the fighting at Palau to Guadalcanal when the C-47 ran low on fuel. The pilot made a forced landing in a small clearing on Bellona Island. During the landing, a propeller tore through the fuselage and severed the trachea of one patient. Hawkins made a suction tube from various items including the inflation tube from a "Mae West." With this contrivance, she kept the man's throat clear of blood until aid arrived 19 hours later. All of her patients survived. For her actions, Hawkins received the Distinguished Flying Cross. Her selfless devotion to duty and outstanding proficiency have reflected highest credit upon herself and the Armed Forces of the United States.
General Orders: General Order number unknown. Citation needed.

HUETHER, RONALD A.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Headquarters Support Company, 15th Medical Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 16 October 1970
Citation:
By direction of the President of the United States of America, under provisions of the Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926 and Department of the Army Message 941895, dated 22 October 1963, the Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to First Lieutenant Ronald A. Huether, Medical Service Corps, for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Huether distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 16 October 1970 in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a medical evacuation mission, First Lieutenant Huether was warned that the unit was still in heavy contact. Arriving on station, First Lieutenant Huether monitored the friendly and enemy situation, and planned the most advantageous approach into the contact area. Upon moving into the fire area, the aircraft began to receive intense hostile fire. First Lieutenant Huether, though in intense pain from plexiglass shrapnel and completely exposed to bullets inches from his head, continued to read off the engine instruments to the aircraft commander. His outstanding ability and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: general Order number 1979, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 29 January 1971

KEARNEY, JAMES C.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Support Company, 15th Medical Battalion (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 29 January 1971
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the following award is announced: For heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Kearney distinguished himself by valorous actions on 29 January 1971, while serving in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a mission to hoist casualties from a contact area to a medical evacuation helicopter, Specialist Four Kearney performed his duties as medic with courage and professionalism. Although wounded by enemy fire, Specialist Four Kearney continued to aid the wounded as they were brought up to the aircraft. Once again Specialist Four Kearney was hit but ignored his own wounds to care for the patients. His outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 2338, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 4 February 1971

KINNEY, MATTHEW S.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
1/C/6-101st Aviation Regiment, TF Out Front
Date of Action: 6 September 2008
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, has awarded The Distinguished Flying Cross to Staff Sergeant Matthew S. Kinney. On 06 September 2008 Dustoff 36, of C Co 6-101Avn Regt based at Jalalabad Airfield, Afghanistan, received an urgent surgical 9-Line MEDEVAC request for troops in contact in the Korengal Valley, approximately 60 kilometers north. Crewed by CW4 _________ (PC), 1LT _________ (PI), SSG _________ (CE), and SSG Matthew S. Kinney (MO), Dustoff 36’s mission was to rescue two critically wounded U.S. Soldiers isolated on rugged terrain high above the valley floor, exposed to enemy fire. The enemy ambush and ensuing firefight had already claimed the lives of two U.S. Soldiers and wounded four others. Upon reaching Asadabad, the AH64Ds that were escorting Dustoff 36 assumed lead in order to escort the unarmed MEDEVAC aircraft into the most dangerous valley in N2KL. As the flight neared the Korengal Valley the troops in contact reported they were still engaged with the enemy. The Apaches entered the Korengal while the MEDEVAC held in the vicinity of FOB Michigan. After multiple “gun runs” the Apaches cleared the MEDEVAC aircraft into the valley. Dustoff 36 approached the ambush kill zone where the soldiers initially came under fire to insert the flight medic. The crew quickly realized that there was no place to land in order to drop off the medic or pick up the wounded. Quickly volunteering to be lowered over 50 feet to the side of the sheer rock precipice, SSG Kinney readied his equipment and attached himself to the hoist. Strong winds and deteriorating weather caused this drop to be extremely dangerous. Spinning out of control and bouncing four times off trees and rock outcroppings, SSG Kinney managed to secure his medic’s bag, weapon and SKED upon arrival on the ground. Once on the ground, SSG Kinney realized that he had been dropped at the location of the Soldier who was killed and that the two wounded Soldiers who needed his assistance were 200 meters away through the kill-zone of the ambush and 200 feet below his present position. Without hesitation SSG Kinney moved, unescorted, to the location of the two wounded Soldiers. SSG Kinney took off running across shear rock faces, through the kill zone of the ambush and to the location of the wounded that still needed care. While moving across this treacherous terrain, SSG Kinney lost his footing, dropping the SKED. SSG Kinney grasped the root system of a tree to keep himself from falling down the side of the mountain. Despite losing the SKED down the side of the hill, SSG Kinney continued toward the location of the two wounded Soldiers and immediately assessed their trauma and provided medical attention. One soldier had been knocked out by the blast of an RPG and thrown nearly 200 feet down the mountain suffered severe internal injuries, a broken arm, broken collar bone and a broken back. Without the SKED to stabilize the Soldier, SSG Kinney used the soldier’s IBA to create an improvised immobilizing brace. However, he was currently conscious and responsive, so SSG Kinney shifted his focus to the other patient who was still drifting in and out of consciousness. As SSG Kinney worked on the ground, the remaining crew of Dustoff 36 held in the valley coordinating with the apaches and ground elements as they continued to engage the enemy. The crew of Dustoff 36 realized they would require refueling to complete the mission. They coordinated with SSG Kinney who required fifteen to twenty additional minutes to properly prepare the wounded Soldiers for hoist. Dustoff 36 departed the valley for FOB Blessing, refueled and returned. Upon reentry to the Korengal Valley one of the Apache escorts on station was engaged and sustained damage by anti-aircraft fire directly over the objective. Shortly thereafter the flight medic called for extraction. Dustoff 36 approached the site well below the ridgeline with minimal clearance between the aircraft and numerous obstacles. SSG _________ exceptional clearing instructions allowed the pilots to maneuver their aircraft within ten feet of a rock face with multiple obstacles just under the rotor system. As the hoist was lowered to the ground, the pilot on the controls, CW4 _________, began to fight to keep the aircraft steady in the intensifying rain and wind. Visibility fell to less than one mile as the first patient was hooked to the hoist cable and lifted to the aircraft. Although the clearance of the litter patient through the trees and along the cliff face was difficult CW4 _________ steady hover work assured a stable platform for the crew to operate from. A storm descended upon the valley, inundating the mountainside with torrential showers and hail, causing all aviation assets to withdraw with the exception of Dustoff 36 and their last remaining Apache escort Hedgerow 51. Although the Apache remained on station, the severity of the storm now caused them to lose visual contact with Dustoff 36 below. Even the Apaches FLIR was rendered useless as the showers and obscuration worsened. After the litter patient was secured inside, the crew discussed the possibility of completing a dual hoist with the flight medic. Although their was an inherent risk in attempting to hoist both the final ambulatory patient and the flight medic at the same time the crew was concerned with the storm cell that was nearing, and the time required to do two separate hoists. This decision undoubtedly saved the entire crew, as conditions began to deteriorate quickly. The flight medic agreed and coordinated with the crew chief to lower the jungle penetrator (JP). As the JP was lowered the storm worsened. Visibility at this time decreased to less than 200 feet. Winds gusted to greater than 35 knots. Rain showers increased, and hail deluged the aircraft, exposed crew, and patient. Visibility continued to degrade to less than 100 feet, the rain and hail were pelting SSG Kinney, making the preparation of the exfil treacherous in itself. Once hooked up, SSG Kinney called for immediate lift. As soon as SSG Kinney and the wounded Soldier left the ground they began spinning due to the severe winds and rotor wash. Clinging to the wounded Soldier to stabilize and comfort him, SSG Kinney remained calm and protected the Soldier. As SSG Kinney and the final Soldier were raised toward the helicopter visibility plummeted to less than 50 feet. As the hoist neared the helicopter it suddenly seized, stopping ten feet below the helicopter. SSG Frailey immediately notified the crew of the hoists mechanical failure, simultaneously troubleshooting the problem. He then directed the pilots to override the hoist controls from the master control panel located in the cockpit. 1LT _________ attempted to override the controls, the hoist was still unresponsive. The weather, having deteriorated with visibility falling below 50 feet caused the pilots to lose all visual reference points. This forced the crew to now rely solely on SSG _________ obstacle clearance to keep from drifting into the mountainside. He continued to provide clearing instructions to the pilots and manipulate the hoist as he battled the gusting winds which tossed the patient and flight medic still dangling on the jungle penetrator. With SSG Kinney and the Soldier hanging below the aircraft and SSG _________ struggling to keep them stable in the ferocious weather the pilots discussed their options. With time running out, an opening suddenly appeared through the storm clouds surrounding the aircraft. 1LT _________ could just make out a building in a village on the valley floor. Taking the controls 1LT _________ maneuvered the aircraft down the mountainside with the medic and patient still hanging precariously from the hoist. SSG _________ continued to troubleshoot the hoist malfunction while battling the hoist cable to keep the two individuals from swinging out of control. The hoist suddenly lurched, dropping the patient and flight medic five feet. Instantly, SSG _________ switched from the standard operational speed to slow speed mode, resulting in temporary control and saving the lives of the flight medic and patient. Operating the hoist in slow speed, SSG _________ bit by bit raised the hoist high enough to move the patient and flight medic into the aircraft, at which point the hoist failed completely. 1LT _________ continued slowly descending down the mountainside, working toward the village. CW4 Callaway coordinated with the Apaches who provided guidance from above. Upon reaching the valley floor 1LT _________ carefully worked along the valley, with visibility still below 200 feet. Working toward increasingly better weather Dustoff 36 finally emerged from the storm as it exited the Korengal Valley. SSG Kinney continued to advance the treatment of both Soldiers, working for over 30 minutes as the crew flew back to Jalalabad in order to transfer both wounded Soldiers to a higher level of care. The crew of Dustoff 36 completed their mission despite encountering several complications. Overcoming numerous difficulties they all performed exceptionally as individuals and most importantly as a crew to save the lives of two U.S. Soldiers. Their management of the most adverse conditions and bravery in the face of an armed enemy displays the highest standard of conduct and goes beyond the highest expectations of any U.S. service member.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 325-21

LAFLEUR, DIRK D.
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
C Company, 3-82 Aviation Regiment, TF Talon
Date of Action: 14 February 2010
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926, has awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross to Major Dirk D. LaFleur, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, for extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight on 14 February 2010. For valorous achievement while serving as a Dustoff Pilot in Command during Operation Enduring Freedom 09-10. MAJ LaFleur’s exemplary performance of duty contributed immensely to the overall success of the unit’s mission. His dedication to service reflects great credit upon himself, Task Force Pegasus, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Permanent Order number 061-026, Headquarters, USFOR-A, 2 March 2010

Narrative to accompany the award of the Distinguished Flying Cross:
MAJ Dirk LaFleur’s exceptionally valorous performance of duty proved critical while providing rotary wing MEDEVAC support to Kilo Company, 3rd Battalion, 6th Marines under enemy fire and in the face of danger during the initial offensive of Operation MOSHTARAK on 14 February 2010 within the city of Marjeh near Camp Hill and Water Flour Mill Junction, Helmand Province, Afghanistan. MAJ LaFleur’s achievements as a Dustoff Pilot-in-Command were nothing short of heroic and indicative of the highest professionalism of aviators in combat. During the initial phase of NATO/ISAF offensive operation into Marjeh while supporting 2nd Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB), DUSTOFF 57’s (DO57) crew conducted over 19 9 line MEDEVAC support missions from FOB Dwyer in support of 1st and 3rd Battalions, 6th Marines. During this five-day period eleven lives were saved and over ten combat flight hours flown during missions experiencing extreme environmental conditions, and heavy enemy small arms fire and RPG’s. Despite the known enemy intent to target and shoot down Coalition aircraft, MAJ LaFleur led his crew into numerous hot LZ’s to pick up wounded Marines, Afghan National Army Soldiers, Afghan citizens, and enemy combatants who were wounded on the battlefield. In support of mission numbers MM(S) 02-14L & 02-14I at approximately 1500L on 14 FEB 10, MAJ LaFleur, call sign DO57 (UH-60A), and escort DADDY 56 (DD56) (UH-60K) departed FOB Dwyer to the northeast for reporting point Nellie with no AH-1 Cobra gunship available, despite reports of enemy contact in the area. The evacuation was near MEB Objective 3 (Camp Hill) in northern Marjeh. The 02-14L mission was for two Afghan females with severe amputations and head trauma and the 02-14I mission was for a US Marine with a gunshot wound (GSW) to the left shoulder. With complete disregard for their own safety, the flight departed FOB Dwyer under Special VFR conditions with reduced visibility due to blowing dust. With less than one-mile visibility surrounding FOB Dwyer, MAJ LaFleur led the flight of 2 UH-60s while coordinating with the Marine JTACs and controlling agencies for clearance into the HLZs. After receiving clearance from the Regimental JTAC (SEIGE 01), MAJ LaFleur directed the flight to transition from 500 feet AGL to Nap of the Earth (NOE) in order to minimize the enemy threat and poor visibility in the area. As the flight maneuvered evasively to reduce exposure to enemy fire from the south and southwest of their formation, MAJ LaFleur directed both aircraft to land at the designated HLZ, despite lack of communication with SEIGE 42, placing the aircraft on a 270 degree heading for landing near the Marine position. On approach, his crew chief watched an RPG cross from left to right of the helicopter’s 7 o’clock position. After receiving a call from DD56 informing him of purple smoke in a second HLZ less than 500 meters to the south of their position, MAJ LaFleur directed the flight to maneuver to the identified area. Simultaneously, a second RPG exploded 20 feet behind DO57’s position. MAJ LaFleur directed his co-pilot, CPT ________, to assess all control inputs while maneuvering toward the purple smoke, despite an increased barrage of enemy fire directed towards their flight. A second landing was attempted, but heavy dust caused him to abort the landing. After various evasive maneuvers, another RPG burst was reported to be targeting DD56 only 700-800 meters to the north. After the second landing, DO57 watched small arms fire impacting towards the nose of the aircraft. On a heading of 220 degrees between a grape hut and broken compound wall looking towards the enemy’s hidden locations, his crew chief and medic were told the two Afghan patients died of wounds, but the wounded Marine still needed evacuation. After loading the patient, the aircraft departed in a tight right turn towards the east at 30 feet, and the crew felt another air burst beneath the aircraft, which caused the aircraft to surge forward uncontrollably. Within seconds and while turning evasively towards the north, a fourth RPG exploded to the aircraft’s 5 o’clock position just under the main rotor disk. While maneuvering the helicopter using the terrain to mask the flight from enemy fire, MAJ LaFleur safely navigated both aircraft to the release point and then FOB Dwyer. Because of his actions and calm thinking while under intense enemy fire, MAJ LaFleur was able to protect his flight and aircraft through exceptional aviator skill and extraordinary decision making in the midst of heavy enemy fire. MAJ LaFleur’s keen situational awareness and extraordinary decision making resulted in saving the life of one wounded Marine during MM(S) 02-14I, and during several other medical evacuation missions during the initial days of Operation Moshtarak. Despite the hailstorm of enemy fire, DO57 only received one bullet hole through the left fuel cell, a testament to the extraordinary aviator skills of MAJ LaFleur and his aircrew. The heroic evacuation conducted by MAJ LaFleur and his flight helped preserve 3rd Battalion’s combat power, and allowed them to focus their forces on maintaining pressure and destroying Anti-Afghan and Taliban forces during the early phases of Operation Moshtarak.

LOVELACE, WILLIAM R.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, U.S. Army Air Corps Chief, Aeromedical Unit, Dayton Field, Ohio
Date of Action: August 1944
Citation:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926, has awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross to Lieutenant Colonel William R. Lovelace, Medical Corps, United States Army Air Forces, while serving as the Chief of Aeromedical Unit at Dayton Field, Ohio between August 29 and September 2 1944 for heroism beyond the call of duty in recognition of his record altitude jump to test oxygen equipment during the parachute decent. His devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself, the U.S. Army Air Corps and the Armed Forces of the United States.
General Orders: General Order unknown, From the book “Courage And Devotion Beyond The Call Of Duty” Second Preliminary Edition July 1946
Home of Record: Rochester, Minnesota

*LUTZ, ALEDA E.
First Lieutenant, Army Nurse Corps, U.S. Army
Flight Nurse
Date of Action: 1 November 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926, takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to First Lieutenant Aleda E. Lutz, Army Nurse Corps. For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as flight nurse of a C-47 type aircraft. Throughout her long period of service, Lieutenant Lutz has distinguished herself through her superior professional skill and courage. Flying on more than 190 missions to evacuate wounded personnel from the forward areas, Lieutenant Lutz’s resourcefulness and determination have been of high inspiration to those serving with her. On 1 November 1944, while flying on a mission to evacuate wounded personnel from the front lines, a severe storm rocked Lieutenant Lutz’s aircraft from her pilot’s control, and it crashed in Southern France. Her selfless devotion to duty and outstanding proficiency have reflected highest credit upon herself and the Armed Forces of the United States.

MAYER, HENRY A. JR.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 24 February 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism while participating in aerial flight is awarded by the Department of the Army to Captain Henry A. Mayer Jr., Medical Service Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while participating in aerial flight three miles west of DI Linh on 24 February 1967. During the morning of 24 February 1967 a dug-in and camouflaged enemy force estimated to number 700 troops had ambushed and fragmented two companies of ARVN troops, who withdrew in confusion with their leaders all killed. The enemy then retired to their prepared positions and managed to remain undetected throughout most of the day. Later in the afternoon a Forward Air Controller flying an O-1E discovered the hidden force and exposed them. In the ensuing firefight several of the participating aircraft were damaged. One aircraft was shot down, crashing 450 meters in front of the enemy position on a tea plantation, and the Forward Air Controller was wounded. He was extracted from the wreckage and pulled back another hundred meters before ground rescuers were pinned down by enemy fire. When two gunships on the scene ran out of ammunition they attempted to pick up the wounded. Both gunships were hit severely by enemy gunfire and forced to withdraw. At this time Captain Mayer was directed into the area to make the rescue. Captain Mayer flew his UH-1B into the wreckage area and suffered several hits while he and his crew attempted to spot the wounded Forward Air Controller and his rescuers among the thick rows of tea bushes. He was forced to withdraw by intense ground fire. Captain Mayer then came in straight down the rays of the setting sun toward the enemy so they would have difficulty seeing him. He skillfully kept himself between the sun and the enemy, and, in spite of an unfavorable wind on this approach, he made an expeditions and successful pickup. Again, this was done under heavy fire and in the face of five previous unsuccessful attempts by his and other aircraft, which attest to Captain Mayer’s intrepidity, bravery, heroism, and flying skill. His outstanding performance reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 20, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 7 April 1969

MOORE, DOUGLAS E. (First Award)
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
Date of Action: 31 January 1965
Citation:
By direction of the President of the United States of America, under provisions of the Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926 and Department of the Army Message 941895, dated 22 October 1963, the Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to Major Douglas E. Moore, Medical Service Corps, for heroism while participating in aerial flight: Major Moore distinguished himself by heroic action on 31 January 1965 while serving as pilot of a helicopter ambulance involved in evacuating four seriously wounded friendly soldiers from a battle zone in the Republic of Vietnam. When Major Moore arrived to evacuate the wounded, friendly forces were pinned down by heavy and accurate enemy fire. Knowing that the landing area was still under heavy fire from three directions, Major Moore, with complete disregard for his safety, elected to attempt evacuation. In order to accomplish his mission, he was required to land in the battle area three times to evacuate four seriously wounded soldiers and in so doing his helicopter was hit by enemy fire and his crew chief wounded. Major Moore’s heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 2224, Headquarters, United States Military Assistance Command, 26 October 1965

MOORE, DOUGLAS E. (Second Award)
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Military Assistance Command, Vietnam
Date of Action: 9 February 1965
Citation:
By direction of the President of the United States of America, under provisions of the Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926 and Department of the Army Message 941895, dated 22 October 1963, the Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to Major Douglas E. Moore, Medical Service Corps, for heroism while participating in aerial flight: Major Moore distinguished himself by heroic action on 9 February 1965 while serving as an aircraft commander of a medical evacuation helicopter on a rescue mission in the Republic of Vietnam. As a result of hostile action, four helicopters were downed and many American and Vietnamese soldiers became casualties. Major Moore volunteered to go to the aid of the wounded with the assistance of armed helicopters. Upon approaching the area the medical aidman and crew chief reported seeing tracer fire in the vicinity of the crash site. Major Moore nevertheless continued into the landing zone though a lack of communication with the ground prevented him from knowing what to expect. Once the aircraft landed and the loading of the injured personnel was completed, Major Moore skillfully assisted the pilot as the helicopter made a fast and successful departure under fire. Major Moore’s heroic action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 1772, Headquarters, United States Military Assistance Command, 12 August 1965

ODOM, ROBERT E.
Major, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: World War II Synopsis:
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926, has awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross to Major Robert E. Odom, Medical Corps, United States Army while serving in World War II. His devotion to duty reflect the highest credit upon himself, the U.S. Army and the Armed Forces of the United States.
General Orders: General Order unknown, From the book "Courage And Devotion Beyond The Call Of Duty" Second Preliminary Edition July 1946
Home of Record: Youngstown, Ohio

POMMETT, FRANCIS A. JR.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
498th Medical Company (Air Ambulance), 43d Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 18 February 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism while participating in aerial flight, evidenced by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam, is awarded to First Lieutenant Francis A. Pommett Jr. First Lieutenant Pommett distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 February 1967 while serving as pilot of a helicopter ambulance during the emergency evacuation of casualties from dense jungle near Phan Thiet. As Lieutenant Pommett approached the pickup point at night to make a difficult cable hoist evacuation for the wounded man, his aircraft received heavy enemy ground fire. He quickly flew clear of the area, turned off all of the helicopter’s lights and returned to the pickup site under blackout conditions. The insurgents threw up a barrage of intense machine gun fire, but he held the aircraft in a stable hover until the casualty was hoisted aboard. While he was leaving for a field hospital, he received a request to return to the pickup site for another seriously wounded man. Ignoring the danger to himself because another man’s life was imperiled, Lieutenant Pommett hurried back to the dangerous zone. The Viet Cong again filled the air around the ambulance helicopter with machine gun fire, but he hovered motionlessly until the second patient was aboard. His courageous flying under these critical conditions was instrumental in saving the lives of two men who would otherwise have died of their wounds. First Lieutenant Pommett'’ outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 5041, Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam, 3 October 1967

RHODES, JERRY L.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Headquarters & Service Company, 15th Medical Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 5 January 1970
Citation:
By direction of the President of the United States of America, under provisions of the Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926 the Distinguished Flying Cross is awarded to Captain Jerry L. Rhodes, Medical Service Corps, for heroism while participating in aerial flight evidenced by voluntary action above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Rhodes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 5 January 1970, while serving as pilot in the Republic of Vietnam. Although the ground unit was still in heavy contact, because of the seriousness of the patients, Captain Rhodes decided to make an immediate extraction. After organizing the mission and coordinating with gunships, the aircraft was brought to a hover over the area and the penetrator lowered even though they were receiving automatic weapons fire. While advising the gunships of the enemy positions and assisting the aircraft commander, his craft took a B-40 round. As they were making an emergency landing, he made his emergency radio calls, advising the ground troops and gunships of their situation. His outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 3672, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, 13 March 1970

SIEDOR, CHRISTOPHER M.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
57th Medical Detachment
Date of Action: 22 January 1972
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the following award is announced, the Distinguished Flying Cross, for heroism while participating in aerial flight, witnessed by voluntary actions above and beyond the call of duty in the Republic of Vietnam: First Lieutenant Christopher M. Siedor, Medical Service Corps, distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 January 1972 while serving as the Aircraft Commander aboard an unarmed Medical Evacuation Helicopter. On 22 January 1972 members of the 16th Popular Forces Regiment sustained heavy casualties while engaged in fierce contact with a Viet Cong Battalion in Kien Hoa Province, Republic of Vietnam. Dustoff 79, commanded by Lieutenant Siedor, was summoned to evacuate a seriously wounded Army Republic of Vietnam Soldier from a besieged outpost held by the Popular Forces. The first attempt to extract the wounded patient nearly met with disaster when the unarmed Medevac ship received a heavy amount of enemy automatic weapons fire as it approached the pickup site. Barely evading the withering fusillade of fire, the Dustoff aircraft outdistanced the barrage, and Lieutenant Siedor, assuming the aircraft controls from his pilot, returned to the pickup site and executed a highly sophisticated, tactical approach to the pickup site in the dark, moonless night. This second attempt had to be aborted as well when a massive hail of mortar rounds began impacting in and around the landing zone, making the destruction of the aircraft imminent. After securing gunship cover, First Lieutenant Siedor and his crew returned once more to the pickup site, determined to make the evacuation of the now failing patient. On the third approach into the landing zone First Lieutenant Siedor elected to refrain from using his landing lights in an effort to avoid the hostile fire. First Lieutenant Siedor masterfully flew his aircraft into the landing zone with little difficulty with the verbal aid and directions of his crew members. The urgent patient was securely loaded aboard, and as the Dustoff ship departed the landing zone it was met with another barrage of mortar fire. First Lieutenant Siedor immediately responded by rolling his aircraft into sharp left and right rolling banks to escape the explosions, and in doing so guaranteed the safe success of the mission. First Lieutenant Siedor's outstanding flying abilities and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 40, Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam/MACV Support Command, 19 January 1973

VADELNIEKS, GEORGE I. (First Award)
Chief Warrant Officer Two, U.S. Army
Date of Action: unknown
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross, for heroism while participating in aerial flight is awarded by the Department of the Army to Chief Warrant Officer Two George I. Vadelnieks, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam. No other information is known about this action. His outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number unknown. CW2 Vadelnieks received the DFC with Oak Leaf Cluster from LTG Stanley R. Larsen, Sixth United States Army, at Letterman General Hospital.

VADELNIEKS, GEORGE I. (Second Award)
Chief Warrant Officer Two, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 29 July 1967
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross, First Oak Leaf Cluster, for heroism while participating in aerial flight is awarded by the Department of the Army to Chief Warrant Officer Two George I. Vadelnieks, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight in the Republic of Vietnam on 29 July 1967. On that date, while serving as aircraft commander of a medical evacuation helicopter on a rescue mission near Dong Tam. Warrant Officer Vadelnieks flew his helicopter through a Vit Cong infested area and through fire from numerous enemy automatic weapons, while approaching the landing zone. Though seriously wounded in the right leg, he attempted to guide the helicopter away from the onslaught…..intense enemy fire hit the aircraft engine, causing a forced landing in the midst of Viet Cong positions…..Warrant Officer Vadelnieks calmly gave attention to the safety of his crew and prevention of fire aboard the craft. Although he was hit twice more by enemy fire, he courageously defended his craft against the advancing insurgents until his wounds prevented his fighting….” . His outstanding flying ability and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number unknown, from a Letterman General Hospital newspaper whereby LTG Stanley R. Larsen, Sixth United States Army, presented the award.

WHITE, THOMAS ROBERT
First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, U.S. Army Air Corps
1st Special Aviation Project
Date of Action: 18 April 1942
Citation Needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, approved July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Distinguished Flying Cross to First Lieutenant, Medical Corps, Thomas Robert White, United States Army Air Forces, for extraordinary achievement as Engineer/Gunner of a B-25 Bomber and Flight Surgeon of the 1st Special Aviation Project (Doolittle Raider Force), while participating in a highly destructive raid on the Japanese mainland on 18 April 1942. Lieutenant White with 79 other officers and enlisted men volunteered for this mission knowing full well that the chances of survival were extremely remote, and executed his part in it with great skill and daring. This achievement reflects high credit on himself and the military service.

WILLIAMSON, JAMES A.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 10 March 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926, the Distinguished Flying Cross for heroism while participating in aerial flight is awarded by the Department of the Army to Captain James A. Williamson, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism involving voluntary risk of life in the Republic of Vietnam on 10 March 1967. On that date a unit had been hit by heavy mortar fire resulting in heavy casualties. Captain Williamson immediately responded to the unit’s request of medical assistance and directed his helicopter to the evacuation site. He continued on the mission even when several attempts to receive artillery clearance proved futile. Throughout his approach into the pick-up zone, which was executed without the aid of aircraft lights due to the close proximity of the enemy force, Captain Williamson’s aircraft was skillfully guided through heavy ground fire. At the termination of his first approach, a mortar exploded a short distance in front of his aircraft. However, Captain Williamson remained in the pick-up zone until all wounded men were aboard his aircraft. After delivering his patients to the nearest medical facility. Captain Williamson returned to the location and evacuated eight more patients. By his courageous action and humanitarian regard for his fellow man, in the dedication of his service to his country, Captain Williamson has reflected great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 50, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 8 September 1970