U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

Soldier's Medal, 1960 - , A-L

Soldier's Medal

* Interesting Notes:

Specialist Michael Bivens and Sergeant Tommy Intessimone earned their Soldier's Medals for actions performed during the Green Ramp disaster on March 23, 1994 at Fort Bragg, NC.

Captain John P. Gaffaney was awarded the Soldier’s Medal Posthumously for his actions during the mass shootings at the Soldier Readiness Processing Center, Fort Hood, TX on 5 November 2009.

Read Lieutenant Colonel Richard F. Barquist’s citation of a daring rescue operation on a rugged snow covered mountain peak in Iran.

Captain James F. Blankenship was a Dental Corps Officer

Staff Sergeant Spencer Howell and another Soldier braved fire and the chance of exploding ordnance to rescue 4 pilots after 2 helicopters collided.

After the crash of a U-1A Otter, in which he was a passenger, Colonel Arthur W. Buswell saved the life of the pilot after the craft became enveloped in flames.

Captain Franklin J. Derusso saved the life of a suicidal patient preparing to jump from the 5th floor of the hospital.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

ADAMS, LON E.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 22 June 1987
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Lon E. Adams, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 22 June 1987, while a member of the 343d Medical Detachment, Fort Hood, Texas. Sergeant Adams’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 26, Department of the Army, 10 June 1989

ALLEN, EUGENE R.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 12 July 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Eugene R. Allen, Army Medical Service, United States Army United States Army Medical Center, Ryukyu Islands, who distinguished himself by heroism while assigned for duty as a Medical Aidman to the Okuma R&R Center, Ryukyu Islands. On 12 July 1967, Specialist Allen was summoned to render first aid to a fellow serviceman who had fallen from a waterfall approximately 100 feet high, located at Okuma, Okinawa. Showing complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Allen crawled over extremely hazardous terrain to where the victim lay seriously injured. Upon reaching the injured person, he administered emergency medical aid which stemmed loss of blood and prevented shock and the subsequent death of the patient. The physical characteristics of the terrain made evacuation by litter impossible and the hazardous areas along the evacuation route made it necessary for Specialist Allen to carry the patient on his back. During this slow, tedious procedure, Specialist Allen covered ground so hazardous that a single step could have resulted in death. Because of Specialist Allen’s alertness and quick thinking, the patient was evacuated to the United States Army Hospital, Ryukyu Islands, in record time for further medical treatment. Specialist Allen’s heroic performance of duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army Medical Corps. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Allen by the Commanding General, United States Army, Ryukyu Islands, under provisions of paragraph 7a, AR 672-5-1, for heroism on 12 July 1967.)
General Orders: General Order number 44, Department of the Army, 22 August 1968

AMOS, JOHN S. JR.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 29 October 1979
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four John S. Amos Jr., Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 29 October 1979, while a member of Medical Company, Headquarters, United States Army Medical Department Activity. Specialist Four Amos’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 18 April 1980

ANDERSON, JAMES E.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 31 October 1966
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel James E. Anderson, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism on 31 October 1966 at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology. Colonel Anderson while walking up a flight of stairs, observed a laboratory technician drop a glass bottle of highly toxic sulphuric acid, causing the contents to splash over his person and face. As the technician was groping around helplessly, being temporarily blinded by the acid, Colonel Anderson unhesitatingly rushed to his aid. With compete disregard for his own personal safety Colonel Anderson guided the technician to the nearest sink and commenced flushing the technician’s burns with water. Although Colonel Anderson himself had been splashed with sulphuric acid dangerously close to his eyes, he continued flushing the technician’s burns until help arrived. Only after the technician was in the care of other members of the Radiation Pathology Branch did Colonel Anderson tend to his own burns. Colonel Anderson’s presence of mind and prompt and heroic action in this sudden and hazardous situation undoubtedly prevented serious injury and reflects exemplary conduct in the most cherished traditions of the United States Army and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 17 March 1967

BAKER, JAMES C.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 January 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain James C. Baker, Medical Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroic and meritorious action on the morning of 18 January 1968. Upon arriving at the flooded bridge crossing on Hardee Road, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Captain Baker, despite the swift water and without regard for his own personal safety, entered the water and swam from tree to tree in a vain attempt to locate the man and boy whom he had seen swept away by the rushing water. Captain Baker swam and waded in dangerous water approximately 1,000 yards in the unsuccessful search. Captain Baker’s courageous actions and disregard for personal safety in the face of danger were in the highest traditions of valor and reflect great credit upon himself, the Army Medical Service, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 17 March 1967

BAKER, JOHNNY W.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 February 1975
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Johnny W. Baker, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 7 February 1975, while a member of Air Ambulance Branch, United States Army Aeromedical Center. Specialist Five Baker’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 8 June 1976

BALLARD, OSBORN JR.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 12 November 1982
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Osborn Ballard Jr., Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 12 November 1982, while a member of the United States Army Medical Department Activity, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Specialist Four Ballard’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 48, Department of the Army, 14 November 1983

BARQUIST, RICHARD F.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 4 – 6 February 1961
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 2, 1926, takes pleasure in presenting the Soldier's Medal to Lieutenant Colonel (Medical Corps), [then Major] Richard F. Barquist, United States Army, for heroism at the risk of life not involving conflict with an armed enemy heroism during the period 4 to 6 February 1961, while assigned as Commanding Officer, United States Army Hospital, Teheran, Iran. An American L-23 aircraft, with two persons aboard, crashed on a rugged snow covered mountain peak in central Iran. When it was suggested that a doctor accompany the rescue search party, Colonel Barquist immediately and unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in the extremely dangerous rescue operation. It was believed the crash site at about the 13,000 foot level, which was characterized by heavy snow, violent winds, bitter cold, and imminent danger of avalanches, would be inaccessible during the winter months. The only possible access to the disaster scene from the point of operations at about 6,000 feet below the crash site was by helicopter which had to operate at reduced pay load and fuel load because of the high-altitude. Colonel Barquist flew in the first helicopter for the initial rescue attempt, and as it approached the area, a fierce storm suddenly arose and prevented the helicopter from landing. As the aircraft lashed by the strong wind bouncing around in the air and was in danger of crashing, he threw his meager survival equipment out the door and courageously jumped through the swirling and completely blinding snow from a height of about 20 feet. With grim determination, he fought his way through the bitter cold, deep snow and treacherous storm to reach the crash site. Although the victims had perished, through Colonel Barquist’s undaunted efforts, their remains were recovered for proper burial. He placed himself in this vulnerable position without regard for his own life or personal safety and clearly demonstrated his devotion to the health and safety of others. Colonel Barquist’s heroic act in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself the Medical Corps, and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 16, 10 April 1962

BETTENCOURT, WALTER V.
Chief Warrant Officer, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 21 March 1975
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer Walter V. Bettencourt, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 21 March 1975, while a member of the 326th Medical Battalion, 101st Airborne Division. Chief Warrant Officer Bettencourt’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 22, Department of the Army, 26 November 1976

BINDA, RENO J.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 11 August 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Lieutenant Colonel Reno J. Binda, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by outstanding heroism involving voluntary risk of his life on 11 August 1968 at Lake Ontario, New York. During after duty hours Colonel Binda and a fellow officer were fishing in a 19 foot outboard motor boat on Lake Ontario when Colonel Binda heard faint sounds, believed to be calls for help. Upon looking over the surrounding waters he saw two floating objects in the distance approximately one mile away. The winds were high and th water was extremely rough. However, his companion operated the motor while Colonel Binda positioned himself in the bow of the boat to act as a guide through an area of rocks that was known for underwater shoals which created additional navigation hazards. Disregarding personal safety and at the risk of life, the boat was successfully maneuvered through the high waves and rocks to the spot where two men were found floating. Their boat had capsized and sunk in the water. With the assistance of his companion, Colonel Binda pulled one victim from the water into the boat. The other victim was floating face down in the water in a state of shock and near death from drowning. Colonel Binda had to dangle from the side of the boat while his companion held onto his feet in order to reach this victim and rescue him. Following first aid, this man was carried to a local marina whence he was rushed to a hospital. By his complete disregard for his own safety, and by his clear thinking, Colonel Binda was instrumental in saving the lives of two men. Colonel Binda’s prompt and courageous actions in this hazardous situation are in the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded by Commanding General, First United States Army, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland, under the provisions of paragraph 7, AR 672-5-1, to Colonel Reno J. Binda for heroism on 11 August 1968.)
General Orders: General Order number 20, Department of the Army, 7 April 1969

BIVINS, MICHAEL D.
Specialist, Medical Department, U.S. Army
C Company, 782d Main Support Battalion, 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 23 March 1994
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Michael Bivins, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of C Company, 782d Main Support Battalion, 82d Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, NC, for heroism on 23 March 1994, at Pope Air Force Base, NC. On that date an F-16 collided with a C-130 in a mid-air collision causing the F-16 to crash and slide into a C-141 parked on the ramp. This collision ruptured the C-141’s fuel tanks which ignited causing a huge fireball to accompany the F-16 debris into Soldiers waiting to board aircraft for Airborne Operations. Specialist Bivins’ intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions saved many lives and reflect utmost credit on himself, and the Army Medical Department, and upholds the honored traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 1, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 31 March 1996

BLAIR, CHAD E.
Specialist, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 17 April 1996
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Chad E. Blair, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 17 April 1996, while a member of the 236th Medical Company (AA), APO AE 09789). Specialist Blair’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. This order supersedes United States Total Army Personnel Command, Permanent Order 344-3, dated 9 December 1996.
General Orders: General Order number 14, Department of the Army, 11 April 1997

BLAIR, ROBERT A.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 14 February 1988
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Robert A. Blair, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 14 February 1988, while a member of the United States Army Medical Component, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, APO San Francisco, 96346-5000. Staff Sergeant Blair’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army, 20 June 1990

BLAND, JAMES G.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 July 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain James G. Bland, Medical Corps, as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 13th Infantry, distinguished himself by heroism on 27 July 1964, near Michelstadt, Germany. When informed that urgent assistance was needed at the scene of an accident in which an Army truck, carrying sixteen tons of 155mm ammunition, had turned over, started to burn, and pinned the driver beneath the wreckage, Captain Bland unhesitatingly volunteered to participate in the rescue effort. As he and the rescue party arrived in a vehicle (Tracked Recovery) at the accident site in a wooded area, the exploding 155mm shells had started a number of brush fires and one serious fire threatened 40,000 acres of prime coniferous forest. With complete disregard for his own safety and ignoring the exploding shells and fire, he rode to the area of the wreckage where exploding shells prevented the evacuation of the truck driver. When the hazardous situation required that the rescue vehicle be moved to safe location, he dismounted and crawled through brush fires to reach the truck. Two minutes after the medics determined that the driver was no longer alive and the rescue party had moved to a safe are, a tremendous explosion occurred hurling blazing fragments into the air and starting new fires. Throughout the dangerous rescue mission, he demonstrated fortitude, perseverance, and deep concern for the life of a fellow soldier. Captain Bland’s heroic conduct is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 35, Department of the Army, 27 October 1965

BLANKENSHIP, JAMES F.
Captain, Dental Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 November 1975
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain James F. Blankenship, Dental Corps, United States Army for heroism on 6 November 1975, while a member of the Dwight David Eisenhower Army Medical Center. Captain Blankenship’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 22, Department of the Army, 26 November 1976

BONDS, GERALD W.
Warrant Officer One, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 22 July 1983
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Warrant Officer One Gerald W. Bonds, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 22 July 1983, while a member of the 1133rd Medical Company, Alabama Army National Guard. Warrant Officer One Bonds’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 45, Department of the Army, 1 December 1986

BRASWELL, JOHN T. III
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 31 January 1987
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant John T. Braswell III, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 31 January 1987, while a member of the Company F (Airborne), 3d Battalion, Academy Brigade, Academy of Health Sciences, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Sergeant Braswell’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 53, Department of the Army, 30 September 1987

BRATCHER, MARK A.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 24 May 1978
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Mark A. Bratcher, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 24 May 1978, while a member of the 431st Medical Detachment (HA). Specialist Five Bratcher’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 5, Department of the Army, 7 March 1979

BURNETT, STEVEN C.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 February 1984
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Steven C. Burnett, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 15 February 1984, while a member of Letterman Army Medical Center, Presidio of San Francisco, California. Specialist Five Burnett’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 35, Department of the Army, 15 November 1984

BUSWELL, ARTHUR W.
Colonel, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 12 December 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Colonel Arthur W. Buswell, Medical Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on the morning of 12 December 1968 at Hunter Liggett, California, while assigned as a member of G2/3 Section, Headquarters, United States Army Combat Developments Command Experimentation Command, Fort Ord, California. Colonel Buswell’s heroic effort that endangered his own life, was responsible for saving the life of the pilot of a U-1A Otter involved in a crash in which Colonel Buswell was a passenger. The plane became engulfed in flame after crashing. All passengers exited through the rear door. After a quick head count was taken, it was noted that the pilot was trapped in his cabin. The pilot was almost completely enveloped in flames when Colonel Buswell appeared at the pilot’s window. Colonel Buswell opened the door from the outside and helped the pilot from the aircraft. Had it not been for the courage of Colonel Buswell in returning to the burning aircraft, the pilot would have perished in the fire. It was apparent to everyone at the crash scene that the aircraft was about to explode when Colonel Buswell returned to release the pilot, and it did explode very shortly after they left the aircraft. Through Colonel Buswell’s quick presence of mind, ready courage and deep concern for the welfare of others, he risked a hazardous action and prevented a possible loss of life. Colonel Buswell’s heroic conduct and prompt action in this emergency situation are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 36, Department of the Army, 6 June 1969

CAMILLOCCI, PHILIP L.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 May 1986
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Philip L. Camillocci, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 7 May 1986, while a member of the United States Army Medical Component, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences, Thailand. Staff Sergeant Camillocci’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 30, Department of the Army, 1 July 1987

CHALK, JACKYE Q.
Specialist Six, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 April 1979
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Six Jackye Q. Chalk, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 27 April 1979, while a member of Company B, Troop Command, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Specialist Six Chalk’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 14, Department of the Army, 4 November 1980

CHAPPELL, LOYD D.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 26 July 1965
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Loyd D. Chappell, United States Army, as a member of Headquarters Company, United States Army Hospital, Fort Jackson, South Carolina distinguished himself by heroism on 26 July 1965, near Columbia, South Carolina. Staff Sergeant Chappell was conducting personal business in a civilian agency when he heard a loud noise and then saw a flaming truck, loaded with lumber, skidding along the highway in an upturned position. He rushed to the scene of the accident and, with complete disregard for his own safety, forced his way into the blazing vehicle and assisted the helpless driver to a place of safety. After administering professional first aid to the driver, Staff Sergeant Chappell returned to the wrecked vehicle to make certain that there were no other occupants in it. Although he modestly departed from the scene without identifying himself, he was later identified in police reports as the person who participated in this courageous rescue effort. Staff Sergeant Chappell’s prompt and heroic action in this emergency is in the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 5, Department of the Army, 23 February 1966

CHRISTIE, ROBERT J.
Private First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 April 1960
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private First Class Robert J. Christie, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of the Hospital Detachment, United States Army Hospital, Fort Ord, California, distinguished himself by heroism in the vicinity of Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, on 8 April 1960. Private Christie and several companions were sitting on the Carmel Beach when shouts from others on the beach attracted his attention to a swimmer who was being dragged helplessly out to the open sea by the heavy surf. Disregarding the significance of a shark warning report which was announced earlier, and acting without hesitation or concern for his own personal safety, Private Christie plunged into the choppy water and swam out against the strong waves in an effort to aid the exhausted, floundering swimmer. Time after time, the swift current swept him back. Finally, after many grueling attempts, he reached the victim, helped him keep afloat, and assisted him back into shallow water where others on the beach pulled both of them ashore. Private Christi’s prompt, decisive action and courageous efforts saved the young soldier from certain death by drowning. The unselfish heroism which he displayed in this sudden emergency is worthy of emulation, and reflects distinct credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 42, Department of the Army, 7 November 1960

COOK, THANE L.
Chief Warrant Officer, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 16 May 1992
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer Thane L. Cook, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 16 May 1992, while a member of the 229th Medical Detachment, Fort Drum, New York. Chief Warrant Officer Cook’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 13 May 1994

CORNELL, JERRY L.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 4 October 1979
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Jerry L. Cornell, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 4 October 1979, while a member of the 68th Medical Detachment, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Cornell’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 18 April 1980

CRILLY, CLIFFORD L.
Specialist Six, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 10 November 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Six Clifford L. Crilly, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism while serving as the Field Medical Assistant of the United States Army Aviation Detachment (Antarctica Support), while participating in “Operation Deep Freeze 68” in Antarctica. On 10 November 1967 at Camp Number One, Marie Byrdland, Antarctica, Specialist Crilly was performing general duties about the camp when he observed an individual running through the camp with his clothing afire and being pursued by another soldier. The person in flames was obviously in a state of shock and pain. Recognizing the imminent danger to the person afire and the camp in general, he took chase after both individuals and overtook them. With sacrificial and total disregard for his personal safety he threw himself upon the flaming individual’s body and after some trying moments managed to extinguish the flames, thereby possibly saving a life and preventing the spread of flames through the entire camp. Specialist Crilly, by his demonstrated personal courage, has reflected distinct honor upon the United States Army, the United States Army Aviation detachment (Antarctica Support) and himself.
General Orders: General Order number 57, Department of the Army, 17 October 1968

DAGOSTINO, GIANCARLO
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 16 May 1992
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Giancarlo Dagostino, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 16 May 1992, while a member of the 229th Medical Detachment, Fort Drum, New York. Sergeant Dagostino’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 13 May 1994

DANA, PAUL M.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 30 October 1982
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Paul M. Dana, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 30 October 1982, while a member of the 57th Medical Detachment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Specialist Four Dana’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 13, Department of the Army, 11 May 1984

DEDMON, MARK K.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 March 1994
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Mark K. Dedmon, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 23 March 1994, while a member of A Company, 187th Medical Battalion, Fort Sam Houston, TX). Sergeant Dedmon’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. This order supersedes United States Total Army Personnel Command, Permanent Order 234-1, dated 22 August 1995; and confirms revocation of Meritorious Service Medal, Headquarters, XVIII Airborne Corps and Fort Bragg, Permanent Orders 128-40, dated 16 September 1994.
General Orders: General Order number 14, Department of the Army, 11 April 1997

DERUSSO, FRANKLIN J.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 19 June 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Franklin J. DeRusso, Medical Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by an act of unusual bravery and heroism without regard to his own safety on the 19th of June 1968, at the United States Army Medical Center, United States Army Hospital, Ryukyu Islands. On that date, a suicidal patient was preparing to jump from the 5th floor of the hospital, when Captain DeRusso appeared and began to talk to him. This had no effect on the patient and Captain DeRusso crawled beneath the protective fence to the roof ledge which was only 3 ½ feet wide and quite slippery. He walked to the patient and stepped directly between him and the edge of the ledge. Captain DeRusso talked to the patient in a calm tone of voice, and moments later, led the patient back along the length of the protective fence, being careful to keep the patient between himself and the fence, thereby preventing any sudden attempt for the patient to jump off the ledge. The patient, being a much larger man than Captain DeRusso, placed Captain DeRusso at a distinct disadvantage. Captain DeRusso placed his life in jeopardy as the ledge was narrow and slippery and he would surely have been carried over the edge if the patient had made any attempt at harming himself. The patient involved in this incident was a psychiatric patient with a history of several years of bizarre and unusual behavior. He was known to have been potentially violent. There was strong evidence of organic brain damage, making him an unpredictable and unstable person even under normal circumstances. This patient was quite apt to make a sudden and unpredictable lunge and thus carry Captain DeRusso with him over the edge of the ledge to certain death five stories below. Captain DeRusso’s courageous actions were with complete disregard for his own safety and demonstrated a rare sense of obligation to his fellow man. Captain DeRusso’s actions were in accordance with the finest traditions of the United States Army and the Medical Corps.
General Orders: General Order number 7, Department of the Army, 29 January 1969

DUNCALFE, JOSEPH R.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 1 September 1964
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Joseph R. Duncalfe, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of Headquarters, 385th Evacuation Hospital (Semimobile), Spokane, Washington, distinguished himself by heroism on 1 September 1964, near Coeur d’Alene, Idaho. Sergeant Duncalfe was driving on a state highway when he witnessed an accident in which an automobile spun out of control, plunged into Lake Coeur d’Alene, and sunk into water ten feed in depth. Upon stopping his car, he observed that the occupants of the disabled vehicle had not surfaced and were in danger of drowning. Despite the rain, cold, and wind, and with complete disregard for his own safety, Sergeant Duncalfe unhesitatingly dove into the turbulent waters of the lake and succeeded in removing the trapped and seriously injured elderly couple from the sunken car. After getting the man and woman to the safety of the shore, he efficiently administered first aid to them and comforted the elderly couple until an ambulance arrived. Sergeant Duncalfe’s heroic actions and deep concern for his fellow man are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself, the United States Army Reserve, and the military service. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal to Staff Sergeant Duncalfe for heroism on 1 September 1964, as announced in General Orders Number 1, Headquarters, United States Continental Army Command, Fort Monroe, Virginia, dated 5 January 1965)
General Orders: General Order number 19, Department of the Army, 28 May 1965

ELIAS, LEE E.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 January 1977
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Lee E. Elias, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 2 January 1977, while a member of the Company C, 326th Medical Battalion, 101st Airborne Division, United States. Specialist Four Elias’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 4, Department of the Army, 1 June 1978

FITZSIMMONS, JAMES T.
Private First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 April 1965
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private First Class James T. Fitzsimmons, United States Army, as a member of the 28th General Hospital, Phoenixville, Pennsylvania, Distinguished himself by hero ism on 2 April 1965, in the vicinity of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. Private Fitzsimmons was one of five persons in a car when it skidded on an icy road as it approached a bridge, went over an embankment, and landed upside down in approximately 5 feet of water. After freeing himself from the wreckage, he worked diligently to extricate three of the passengers who were trapped in the rear seat of the crushed vehicle. With complete disregard for his own safety, he went under the water three times and each time succeeded in rescuing a victim. Moments before the driver reached safety unaided, Private Fitzsimmons had plunged into the icy water for the fourth time to rescue the driver. Private Fitzsimmons’ heroic conduct, perseverance, and profound concern for his fellow man during this emergency are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 40, Department of the Army, 9 December 1965

FLOCK, JOHN D.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 16 January 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an armed enemy in the Republic of Vietnam: On this date, Lieutenant Flock was serving as medical operations officer at his battalion’s aid station in Lai Khe Base Camp. A helicopter flying over the friendly encampment suddenly developed mechanical difficulties and crashed approximately 100 meters from his location. Lieutenant Flock immediately moved to the scene of the accident and observed six seriously injured men. Although fuel from the ruptured gas tanks was creating an extreme danger of fire or explosion, he completely disregarded his personal safety and began to free three individuals trapped inside the wreckage. After the casualties were removed, Lieutenant Flock instantly administered medial aid and ensured the men were rapidly evacuated. His courageous initiative and outstanding professionalism were responsible for saving the lives of at least two of these individuals. First Lieutenant Flock’s heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1748, Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, 10 March 1969

FRANCONAME, FABIO
Specialist, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 3 June 1992
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Fabio Franconame, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 3 June 1992, while a member of the 54th Medical Detachment, Fort Lewis, Washington, as announced in U.S. Total Army Personnel Command, Permanent Orders 200-8, 10 December 1992. Specialist Franconame’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 14, Department of the Army, 25 June 1993

FREITAS, WILLIAM L.
Chief Warrant Officer, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 28 August 1988
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Chief Warrant Officer William L. Freitas, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 28 August 1988, while a member of the 63d Medical Detachment, Landstuhl, Germany. Chief Warrant Officer Freitas’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 26, Department of the Army, 10 June 1989

*GAFFANEY, JOHN P.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
1908th Medical Company, Independence, MO.
Date of Action: 5 November 2009
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded posthumously to Captain John P. Gaffaney, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of 1908th Medical Company, Independence, MO, for heroism on 5 November 2009 at Fort Hood, Texas during the mass shooting at the Soldier Readiness Processing Center. Captain Gaffaney’s intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions at the cost of his life reflect the utmost credit on himself, and the Army Medical Department, and upholds the honored traditions of the military service.
General Orders: Personal Order number unknown,
Home of Record: San Diego, CA

GALES, CAROLYN B.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 10 June 1990
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Carolyn B. Gales, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 10 June 1990, while a member of 130th Station Hospital, Federal Republic of Germany. Sergeant Gales’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 8, Department of the Army, 15 April 1991

*GARDNER, GREGORY E.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 21 September 1981
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded posthumously to Captain Gregory E. Gardner, Medical Corps, United States Army for heroism on 21 September 1981, while a member of the 2d Battalion (Ranger), 75th Infantry, Fort Lewis, Washington. Captain Gardner’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 12 January 1982

GIFFORD, SHANDON
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
223rd Engineering Battalion, Mississippi National Guard
Date of Action: 7 May 2003
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Shandon Gifford, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of 223rd Engineering Battalion, Mississippi National Guard, for heroism on 3 May 2003. On that date Sergeant Gifford and an officer heard mention of a casualty over the radio. Sergeant Gifford and the officer went out to assess the situation. It appeared that two men intentionally set fire to a minefield causing mortar rounds and land mines to start exploding. One of the mortar round explosions hit a Bradley fighting vehicle. The tank commander of that vehicle was seriously wounded and needed medical assistance and evacuation. Although told three time that he didn’t need to venture into the minefield, Sergeant Gifford knew the officer could not accomplish the rescue by himself. While rushing through a hail of rocket fire and exploding ordnance, Sergeant Gifford narrowly missed being hit several times but continued forward without hesitation or thoughts of his own safety. With no way to suppress the incoming fire, he pressed on through multiple explosions until he was able to reach and evacuate the wounded Soldier. Sergeant Gifford’s intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions saved many lives and reflect utmost credit on himself, and the Army Medical Department, and upholds the honored traditions of the military service.
General Orders: Permanent Order number unknown
Home of Record: Starkville, Mississippi

GOINS, JAMES C. JR.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 11 November 1983
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant James C. Goins, Jr., Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 11 November 1983, while a member of the 57th Medical Detachment, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Staff Sergeant Goins’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 31, Department of the Army, 25 September 1984

HAAS, SCOTT T.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 3 October 1982
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Scott T. Haas, Medical Service Corps, United States Army for heroism on 3 October 1982, while a member of the 10th Medical Laboratory, 7th Medical Command, Germany, on temporary duty in Ras Banas, Egypt. Captain Haas’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 48, Department of the Army, 14 November 1983

HALBUR, RICHARD A.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 30 October 1981
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Richard A. Halbur, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 30 October 1981, while a member of the 5th Combat Support Hospital, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. Specialist Five Halbur’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 9, Department of the Army, 15 April 1982

HANCE, CHARLES T.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 4 January 1986
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Charles T. Hance, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 4 January 1986, while a member of the United States Army Medical Department Activity, Alaska. Specialist Four Hance’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 30, Department of the Army, 1 July 1987

HANCOCK, JAMES F.
Specialist Four, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 December 1963
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four James F. Hancock, Medical Department, United States Army, as a member of the 595th Medical Company, distinguished himself by heroism at Smiley Barracks, Karlsruhe, Germany, on 7 December 1963. Specialist Hancock was performing maintenance duties when a fellow soldier attempted to start a flooded generator which backfired, ignited the gasoline, and set the man’s clothing on fire. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Hancock unhesitatingly rushed to the aid of the soldier and extinguished the flames from the clothing by throwing him to the ground and smothering the blaze with his own body. Specialist Hancock’s heroic conduct, sound judgment, and prompt actions in this emergency are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 5 February 1965

HARPER, DAVID A. JR.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Company C (Air Ambulance), 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment, 10th Mountain Division
Date of Action: 24 December 2008
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant David A. Harper Jr., Army Medical Department, United States Army. Sergeant David A. Harper Jr. distinguished himself by exceptionally meritorious conduct in the performance of outstanding service to the United States as a Flight Medic in Company C (Air Ambulance), 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment, Task Force 449th, 10th Mountain Division, Multi-National Corps-Iraq, on 24 December 2008 during operation Iraqi Freedom. During the early afternoon of 24 December 2008, Sergeant Harper was the Flight Medic for “Flat Iron 07”, the second up Medevac aircraft. At 1228, his crew received a nine-line Medevac mission for three urgent litter patients involved in a vehicle roll-over 15 miles north of Diwaniyah. Sergeant Harper responded immediately; rapidly preparing the aircraft and his medical equipment. Despite being warned of possible enemy, in an area known for historical surface to air engagements, the crew launched as a single ship seven minutes after receiving the call. The scene at the pick-up site was chaotic. Sergeant Harper provided continuous information to the pilots during the approach and landing as they navigated around vehicles, personnel, and debris in a confined landing area. Unknown to the crew, the vehicle was upside down and submerged in water that was deeper than six feet. Disregarding the rough terrain and obstacles, Sergeant Harper and the crew chief quickly took control of the scene, coordinated with ground elements and began extrication efforts. Without concern for his own personal safety, Sergeant Harper jumped into the water and used a endotracheal tube as an improvised snorkel. He spent several minutes underwater in order to cut a trapped soldier fee from the vehicle. These actions facilitated the loading of the critically wounded patient with minimal ground time. As “Flat Iron 07” raced to the 86th Combat Support Hospital, the critical disposition of the patient required constant and aggressive medical attention by SGT Harper. He skillfully managed the airway and performed Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation for over 25 minutes in a confined environment. On the ground, Sergeant Harper quickly coordinated with litter teams, unloaded the patient, and conducted a through patient handover with hospital personnel. Sergeant Harper’s superior technical proficiency and courage, led to the rapid evacuation of a gravely injured Soldier. His actions are in keeping with the finest traditions of military service and reflect distinct credit upon himself, Company C (Air Ambulance, 1st Battalion, 52nd Aviation Regiment, Task Force 449th, 10th Mountain Division, the Multi-National Corps-Iraq, and the United States Army
General Orders: Personal Order number 148-009, 28 May 2009

HASKELL, RICHARD D.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 May 1963
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Richard D. Haskell, (then First Lieutenant), Medical Corps, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism at the United States Army Tripler General Hospital, In Hawaii, on 6 May 1963. When Captain Haskell learned that a female patient was observed sitting on the edge of a narrow ledge abutting a patio on the ninth floor of the hospital, her rushed to the scene to render assistance. He quickly addressed the hazardous situation and determined that the depressed, hysterical patient intended to leap to the ground, over one hundred feet below. With ingenuity and speed, he requested the trouser belts of the men in the vicinity, assembled them into a safety belt, and attached it to the rear of his own belt. Then, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, and only the protection of the makeshift safety belt, he unhesitatingly jumped onto the ledge and returned the despondent patient to safety. Captain Haskell’s heroic action in this emergency is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 49, Department of the Army, 22 November 1963

HASTINGS, JOHN L.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 24 February 1986
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant John L. Hastings, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 24 February 1986, while a member of the 82nd Medical Detachment, Fort Riley, Kansas. Sergeant Hastings’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 9, Department of the Army, 1 April 1987

HAUBRICH, HAROLD V.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 March 1962
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Harold V. Haubrich, United States Army, while serving as a Senior Aidman, Company B, 1st Battle Group, 23d Infantry, Fort Richardson, Alaska, distinguished himself by heroism on 27 March 1962 in the vicinity of Campbell Pass, Alaska. Specialist Haubrich was on a routine cross country field training exercise over rugged and hazardous terrain covered with several feet of snow when the lead sergeant of the trail breaking party was suddenly caught in a snow avalanche which carried him down the side of a mountain and buried him under heavy snow. Without hesitation or regard for his own life, and despite the warnings of another member of the party, Specialist Haubrich, laden with skis, rucksack, and field gear, swiftly jumped into the snow slide to assist the trapped sergeant. This rapid action enabled him to retain sight of the sergeant, who, with the exception of one hand, was buried completely under the snow and unable to move either of his arms when the slide subsided. He then quickly and persistently dug a 2 ½ foot passage to the victim’s face and cleared the snow to prevent suffocation. After much difficulty in digging the sergeant out of the snow, he rendered first aid treatment and accompanied him until he was out of danger. Specialist Haubrich’s initiative, perseverance, and courageous and prompt action in the dangerous feat reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 2, Department of the Army, 14 January 1963

HILL, KENDALL A.
Specialist, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 28 August 1988
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Kendall A. Hill, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 28 August 1988, while a member of the 63d Medical Detachment, Federal Republic of Germany. Specialist Hill’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 8, Department of the Army, 15 April 1991

HOHMAN, DONALD R.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 February 1980
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class (then Specialist Six)) Donald R. Hohman, United States Army for heroism on 6 February 1980, while a member of the 97th General Hospital, US Army Europe. Sergeant First Class Hohman’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 19, Department of the Army, 30 July 1981

*HOOD, LAIRD L.
Private, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 19 June 1977
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded Posthumously to Private Laird L. Hood, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 19 June 1977, while a member of the 601st Medical Company, United States Army. Private Laird’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 4, Department of the Army, 1 June 1978

HOWELL, SPENCER A.
Staff Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
507th Medical Company (Air Ambulance), Fort Hood, TX
Date of Action: 29 March 2004
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Spencer A. Howell, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of 507th Medical Company (Air Ambulance), for heroism on 29 March 2004. On that date Staff Sergeant Howell and another Soldier heard a loud noise and a flash of light. Realizing that two helicopters had collided, without hesitation, both Soldiers raced to the crash site. Both aircraft looked completely destroyed and pieces of the airframe were scattered everywhere. One aircraft was on its side and the pilots could be seen trying to exit. The other helicopter was upside down and the pilots still trapped inside. The engines of the second helicopter were still running, on fire, and with electrical poser still applied to the armed missiles, rockets and 20mm onboard ammunitions. Both men began to extract the plots from the second helicopter after quickly helping the two pilots escape from the first. Both pilots were trapped as the flames continued to build. If the scene was not chaotic enough, a C-130 Hercules transport plane landed on the runway just feet from the scene, and the wingtip passed within feet of the burning wreckage, causing huge vortices that fanned the fire. Firefighters arrived and began spraying down the wreckage, which tended to push the flames toward the pilots. Both rescuers were singed but remained steadfast. Staff Sergeant Howell broke open the canopy and cut the jammed harnesses off the pilot with a survival knife. He carried the pilot from the burning wreckage and then returned to help release an unconscious front seat pilot as water foam and flames encroached on them. The second pilot’s food was stuck in the wreckage. Staff Sergeant Howell lifted the pilot’s weight and the other Soldier reached into the twisted wreckage of the cockpit and cut the pilot’s boot off. They then carried both pilots to safety and Staff Sergeant Howell rendered medical aid to all four pilots and accompanied them to the battalion aid station. Staff Sergeant Howell’s intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions saved many lives and reflect utmost credit on himself, and the Army Medical Department, and upholds the honored traditions of the military service.
General Orders: Permanent Order number unknown
Home of Record: Pontiac, Michigan

HUDGENS, JOE J. JR.
Warrant Officer, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 24 May 1978
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Warrant Officer Joe J. Hudgens Jr., Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 24 May 1978, while a member of the 431st Medical Detachment (HA). Warrant Officer Hudgens’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 5, Department of the Army, 7 March 1979

INTESSIMONE, TOMMY E.
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
C Company, 407th Forward Support Battalion, 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 23 March 1994
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Tommy E. Intessimone, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of C Company, 407th Forward Support Battalion, 82d Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, NC, for heroism on 23 March 1994, Pope Air Force Base, NC. On that date an F-16 collided with a C-130 in a mid-air collision causing the F-16 to crash and slide into a C-141 parked on the ramp. This collision ruptured the C-141’s fuel tanks which ignited causing a huge fireball to accompany the F-16 debris into Soldiers waiting to board aircraft for Airborne Operations. Sergeant Intessimone’s intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions saved many lives and reflect the utmost credit on himself, and the Army Medical Department, and upholds the honored traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 1, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 31 March 1996

JACKSON, HOWARD K.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
571st Medical Detachment, Fort Carson, Colorado
Date of Action: 19 May 1987
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Howard K. Jackson, Army Medical Department, United States Army. On 19 May 1987 Sergeant Howard K. Jackson, while assigned to the 571st Medical Detachment, Fort Carson, Colorado, distinguished himself, when helicopter 69-15081, in which he was a crewmember on, crashed on Al Magre Mountain, twelve miles northwest of Fort Carson Colorado. His extraordinary composure, courage and self-sacrificing actions following the crash were directly responsible in extricating the pilots from the burning aircraft seconds prior to explosion and was the key factor in the saving of their lives. Ignoring his personal injuries, Sergeant Jackson endured the harsh elements and physical pain to administer lifesaving medical assistance that saved the lives of two crewmembers. Sergeant Jackson’s actions reflect great credit on him, the 571st Medical Detachment, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army, 20 June 1990

JACKSON, JULIUS M.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 October 1986
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Julius M. Jackson, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 23 October 1986, while a member of the 3d Flight Platoon, 507th Medical Company, Fort Hood, Texas. Sergeant Jackson’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 53, Department of the Army, 30 September 1987

JOHNSON, RAYMOND W.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 17 April 1979
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Raymond W. Johnson, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 17 April 1979, while a member of United States Army Medical Department, West Point. Specialist Five Johnson’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 30, Department of the Army, 11 March 1980

JONES, CASPER PIERCE III
Captain, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 10 June 1990
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Casper Pierce Jones III, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 10 June 1990, while a member of Headquarters, 7th Medical Command, Federal Republic of Germany. Captain Jones’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 8, Department of the Army, 15 April 1991

JONES, DAVID V.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 November 1984
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant David V. Jones, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 7 November 1984, while a member of the 1st Battalion, 15th Infantry Medical Platoon, Federal Republic of Germany. Sergeant Jones’ valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 27, Department of the Army, 1 November 1985

JORGENSEN, JAROLD R. JR.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 August 1992
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Jarold R. Jorgensen Jr., Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 15 August 1992, while a member of the Health Services Command, 1st Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group, Torii Station, Okinawa. Sergeant First Class Jorgensen’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 13 May 1994

KAY, DOUGLAS C.
Staff Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 28 August 1988
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Douglas C. Kay, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 28 August 1988, while a member of the 63rd Medical Detachment, Federal Republic of Germany. Staff Sergeant Kay’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 41, Department of the Army, 29 December 1989

LAU, RAY W.
Sergeant, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 2 May 1992
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant Ray W. Lau, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 2 May 1992, while a member of the United States Army Medical Department Activity, Fort Ord, California. Sergeant Lau’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 27, Department of the Army, 27 December 1994

LEE, HAROLD R.
Recruit, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 9 July 1960
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Recruit Harold R. Lee, United States Army, a member of Company C, Third Battalion, United States Army Medical Training Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, distinguished himself by heroism on 9 July 1960. While driving from his home to Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Recruit Lee noticed a gasoline fire in the rear of a truck driven by a civilian approximately 1 mile from West, Texas. He quickly notified the driver who, realizing that he lacked proper firefighting equipment, backed the truck into a nearby body of water. There was an immediate drop-off of approximately 15 feet, and the truck plunged instantly to the bottom of the deep water. Promptly determining that the driver of the burning truck was unable to extricate himself, Recruit Lee, unhesitatingly and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, dived into the deep water and rescued the trapped man through the window of the truck. The unselfish courage, prompt actions and presence of mind displayed by Recruit Lee in saving the life of a fellow man in this sudden emergency are worthy of emulation, and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 35, Department of the Army, 7 September 1960

LEHOUX, GERARD J.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 11 August 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Gerard J. Lehoux, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on 11 August 1968 as he voluntarily risked his life in order to save the lives of two human beings. While fishing after duty hours at Lake Ontario, New York, Captain Lehoux resued two male civilians who were drowning. This act was performed voluntarily and at the risk of his own life due to the rough, rock filled waters through which he navigated in order to perform the rescue. Captain Lehoux’s act of valor bears signal credit upon him, the United States Army and the military establishment.
General Orders: General Order number 85, Department of the Army, 15 December 1969

LITTLE, RICHARD E.
Specialist Five, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 May 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Richard E. Little, (then Private First Class), United States Army, who, while serving as a Medical Aidman for the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor, 4th Armored Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 8 May 1967 during a field training exercise at Hohenfels, Germany. Two unidentified men from the 3d Infantry Division rushed into the 2d Battalion, 37th Armor mess hall and reported they had heard screams from the impact area of the M79 Grenade Launcher Range. Specialist Little, a battalion aidman, who was present in the mess hall, immediately went to the motor pool and procured an armored ambulance, and accompanied by two other Medical Aidmen, rushed to the scene of the accident. Using the armored ambulance to protect themselves as much as possible from further explosions, the three aidmen maneuvered across the two hundred meters of dud-infested impact area to the aid of the injured men. Completely disregarding his own safety, Specialist Little dismounted the ambulance and proceeded on foot across the dud-strewn impact area to the first injured man. Specialist Little and the other aidmen reached the wounded man and carried him across the dud-strewn area to the ambulance. Then, unhesitatingly, Specialist Little crossed the area for a second time to the other injured man who was over fifty feet from the ambulance. When the second man had been loaded into the ambulance, the vehicle was carefully driven out of the impact area to an awaiting helicopter. Although the range was not in use at the time the two men were injured, the danger of personal injury due to grenade explosions was very real. Specialist Little’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in the highest tradition of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service. (This award supersedes the Army Commendation Medal awarded to Specialist Little per General Order Number 125, Headquarters, Fourth Armored Division, APO New York 09326, dated 1 April 1968.)
General Orders: General Order number 50, Department of the Army, 26 September 1968

LOWRY, ISAAC D.
Private, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 September 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private Isaac D. Lowry, Army Medical Service, United States Army, who distinguished himself by heroism on 15 September 1967 while in training with Company B, Third Battalion, United States Army Medical Training Center, Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Upon hearing an emergency police call on a ham radio receiver that two young girls were trapped an in danger of drowning in the flood waters at Nolan Street underpass, San Antonio, Texas; Private Lowry ran to the scene where a crowd of approximately fifty people were standing observing the two girls floundering in the swirling waters. Seeing that the girls were either unable to or afraid to attempt to reach safety and in immediate danger of being swept away by the still rising flood waters, Private Lowry, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, jumped into the raging waters and, with almost superhuman effort, fought his way through the strong treacherous currents to where the two girls were trapped and wrapped his legs around a bridge center pole nearby. While holding himself in this position, Private Lowry held the two girls in his arms until firemen and police arrived at the scene with rescue equipment and pulled them out. Although exhausted from his fight against the strong currents while holding the two girls, Private Lowry assisted the rescue team in rescuing the two girls from the waters before considering help for himself. This spontaneous reaction to an emergency situation and completely unselfish act by Private Lowry in the face of extreme danger to his own life is in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army. (This award supersedes award of the Army Commendation Medal with “V” device for heroism on 15 September 1967, under provisions of paragraph 7, AR 672-5-1.)
General Orders: General Order number 12, Department of the Army, 17 March 1967

LYNCH, JAMES W.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 28 November 1995
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class James W. Lynch, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 28 November 1995, while a member of the Health Care Recruiting Team 5, Rock Hill, MO. Sergeant First Class Lynch’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army. This order supersedes United States Total Army Personnel Command, Permanent Order 100-15, dated 9 April 1996.
General Orders: General Order number 14, Department of the Army, 11 April 1997

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