U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

Soldier's Medal, 1940-1959, M-Z

Soldier's Medal

* Interesting Notes:

Private Toby Perea earned his Soldier's Medal while a Prisoner of War in Davao Penal Colony, Philippine Islands. In 1944 he was crammed into the hold of a Japanese "Hell Ship" for shipment back to Japan. Tragically, he lost his life when the ship was sunk on 7 September 1944.

Second Lieutenant Norman G. Miller also earned the Bronze Star with "V" device in Korea

Master Sergeant Eugene L. Moon was seriously wounded while wrestling a pistol from an enraged soldier, thus saving the lives of others at the Enlisted Men’s Club.

Sergeant First Class Mitchell Opas made 5 trips of approximately 75 yards carrying seriously wounded Chinese soldiers under heavy artillery fire.

1LT Orah Stephenson, an Army Nurse, earned her Soldier's Medal by rescuing Soldiers from a burning building.

Private First Class Ronald A. Rout acted swiftly to save many lives after the crash of a C-124 aircraft in the icy Han River Estuary.

Lieutenant Colonel John M. Talbot, a member of an OA-9 airplane that crashed and overturned in a lake about a mile and a half from shore, saved one crewmember from drowning and then treated the rest of the badly injured crewmembers until rescued.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

MAIMONE, JOHN A.
Technician Fifth Grade, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
1247th Service Command Unit, 2nd Service Command Hospital Trains
Date of Action: 3 April 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Technician Fifth Grade John A. Maimone, Army Medical Department, 1247th Service Command Unit, 2nd Service Command Hospital Trains, Army of the United States, assisted by fellow soldiers, saved an 8 year old girl from drowning at New Dorp Beach, Staten Island, New York, on 3 April 1945, after the child had been swept 300 yards to sea on a small raft. Seeing the girl’s danger, he immediately plunged into the chilling surf and swam to the raft. Even with the help of two comrades who swam to his assistance, he was unable to push the raft shoreward against a strong ebb tide. Leaving the other soldiers to steady the frail craft and prevent it from drifting further from land, he struck out for shore to secure a boat. In this vessel, with a third assistant, he took the girl and her other rescuers to shore. Technician Maimone’s initiative and heroic conduct at the risk of his own life were in a great measure responsible for saving the child’s life.
General Orders: General Order number 43, War Department, 30 May 1945

MARTIN, ROBERT E.
Specialist Second Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 5 June 1956
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Specialist Second Class Robert E. Martin, (then Specialist Third Class), Army Medical Service, United States Army, Medical Company, 503d Airborne Infantry, distinguished himself by heroism at Rock Drop Zone, Munich, Germany, on 5 June 1956. While participating in a routine training jump from an aircraft in flight a soldier who exited the aircraft shortly after Specialist Martin fell through the suspension lines of Specialist Martin’s parachute. Specialist Martin, displaying quick thinking, grabbed the lines of his fellow soldier’s parachute. This action slowed his fall enough so that Specialist Martin could grasp the canopy of the deflated parachute. During the descent, the extra weight on Specialist Martin’s parachute caused many of the suspension lines to snap. Despite the grave danger to himself Specialist Martin held the canopy of the deflated parachute until the two paratroopers reached the ground. Specialist Martin’s prompt and courageous action reflects great credit on himself and is keeping with the traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 23, Department of the Army, 29 April 1957

MAUNZ, DANIEL H.
Major, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 November 1943
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department to Major Daniel H. Maunz, Medical Corps, United States Army. For heroism at River Clyde, Northwest Territory, on 18 November 1943. Upon receipt of information at Headquarters North Atlantic Wing, Presque Isle, Maine, that a civilian cook with the Ionospheric Research Detachment was seriously ill with acute appendicitis at River Clyde, Northwest Territory, and that no doctor was available, Major Maunz tendered his services in a professional capacity. Since it was impossible to land an airplane safely in the vicinity of Ricer Clyde, Major Maunz volunteered to make a parachute jump, although he had no previous experience, in order to reach his patient. On 18 November 1943, the rescue airplane reached River Clyde, Major Maunz exited at 1200 feet, landed successfully, and performed an operation which undoubtedly saved the patient’s life. Captain Skinner’s exemplary courage and devotion to his fellow soldier is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Army Medical Department and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 41, War Department, 26 may 1944

MILLER, NORMAN G.
Second Lieutenant, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 14 August 1953
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Second Lieutenant Norman G. Miller, Medical Corps, a member of the 224th Infantry Regiment, 40th Infantry Division, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroic achievement near Kumwha, Korea on 14 August 1953. Lieutenant Miller, upon hearing that an ammunition dump had exploded, immediately went to the area. Learning that several men were hut by the explosion and were still in the danger zone, Lieutenant Miller, disregarding his personal safety, entered the burning and exploding area to assist in carrying the wounded men to safety. Lieutenant Miller's act was strictly voluntary and upon his own initiative, although he knew his life would be endangered during every moment he was in the danger area. Lieutenant Miller's heroic actions greatly aided in saving the lives of the men and won for him the admiration and respect of superiors and subordinates alike. The sincere devotion to duty, great bravery and initiative displayed by Lieutenant Miller reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 464, Headquarters, 40th Infantry Division, 1 October 1953
Home of Record: California

MOGLIA, GEORGE E.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 July 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to First Lieutenant George E. Moglia, (then Second Lieutenant), Medical Service Corps, United States Army, a member of the 53d Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), distinguished himself by heroism near Verdun, France on 23 July 1955. Lieutenant Moglia, attached to Headquarters Advance Section, USAREUR Communications Zone, on temporary duty, was preparing his H-13 helicopter for flight when he was notified of an aircraft accident. He immediately proceeded to the scene of the mishap by air. Upon arrival, Lieutenant Moglia noticed that the aircraft was submerged in a small lake with only the tail surfaces visible. Realizing that the pilot might be trapped in the cockpit, Lieutenant Moglia, with complete disregard to personal safety, entered the fuel covered water and attempted to extricate the pilot. After braving the fuel-filled water and spending long minutes under the surface, Lieutenant Moglia became ill. Despite being ill from swallowing the water and getting it in his eyes, he continued his efforts and with the assistance of a fellow officer, he succeeded in removing the pilot from the wreckage and transported him to shore and into the ambulance. Lieutenant Moglia’s heroic attempt to save the life of a brother officer at a decided risk to his own reflects the greatest credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 6, Department of the Army, 4 February 1957

MOON, EUGENE L.
Master Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 6 August 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Master Sergeant Eugene L. Moon, Medical Department, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while a member of Detachment I (Provisional), 8202d Army Unit, Headquarters, United States Military Advisory Group to the Republic of Korea, in Korea, on 6 August 1955. While Sergeant Moon was dining at the Enlisted Men’s Club, a member of his detachment, who had been reprimanded and evicted from the club a short time before for violating club rules returned to the club armed with a revolver. Brandishing his weapon, the belligerent soldier commanded everyone to remain seated. One man who stood up was promptly fired upon and slightly wounded. Sergeant Moon, realizing that others might be seriously wounded or killed, ordered the soldier to surrender his weapon. When he refused to obey, Sergeant Moon, with complete disregard for his own safety, leaped to his feet and attempted to wrest the pistol from him. During the ensuing struggle, Sergeant Moon was fired upon at close range and seriously wounded. Sergeant Moon’s heroic action undoubtedly saved others in the group from serious injury and possible death, reflecting great credit on himself and upholding the esteemed traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army, 21 March 1956

NACHTWEY, ROBERT A.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 June 1944
Citation:
Under provisions of AR 600-45, The Soldier’s Medal is awarded to Captain Robert A. Nachtwey, Medical Corps, United States Army. On 7 June 1944 when the S.S. ***, struck a mine, Captain Nachtwey was painfully injured by the explosion. Obviously in great pain, Captain Nachtwey insisted upon administering aid to numerous wounded soldiers and would not permit himself to be treated until all casualties were evacuated from the sinking ship. Captain Nachtwey’s unselfish devotion to duty facilitated the prompt rescue of all personnel in the short time the vessel remained afloat.
General Orders: General Order number 28, Headquarters, 90th Infantry Division, 24 July 1944

NUNNERY, WILLIAM E.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 1 February 1944
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department to Captain William E. Nunnery, Medical Corps, United States Army. For heroism at March Field, California, on 1 February 1944, when an Army airplane made a forced landing and caught fire. An officer of the combat crew was pinned in this airplane. An explosion of the gas tanks was expected at any minute. Captain Nunnery, who was approximately 800 to 500 yards from the scene of the airplane at the time of its crash, immediately proceeded thereto and upon arriving at the then burning airplane heroically and with utter disregard for his own safety assisted in extricating an officer crew member who was trapped and seriously burned.
General Orders: General Order number 57, War Department, 20 July 1944

OPAS, MITCHELL
Sergeant First Class, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 August 1958
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Mitchell Opas, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism while serving as Medical Advisor to the Kinmen Defense Command, Army of the Government of the Republic of China on 23 August 1958. When the off-shore Kinmen Complex was subjected to an intense artillery attack from the Communist held Chinese mainland, it sustained over 55,000 rounds of artillery fire. Despite the ever present danger of losing his life, Sergeant Opas constantly exposed himself to this heavy artillery fire to rescue seriously wounded Chinese soldiers. Without concern for his own personal safety, Sergeant Opas bodily carried a Chinese officer approximately 75 yards under extremely hazardous and threatening conditions to an underground shelter. Returning to the same area under the same perilous circumstances, he made repeated trips and carried four additional Chinese soldiers seriously wounded by enemy shell fire to safety. Sergeant Opas immediately rendered effective first aid to these wounded men and personally evacuated them to a field hospital. The unselfish courage, devotion to duty and heroic actions displayed by Sergeant Opas elicited the high praise of the President of the Republic of China, the Chinese Army Commander of the Kinmen Defense Command, and reflect the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army, 13 March 1959

*PEREA, TOBY (POW)
Private, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: August 1943
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded posthumously by the War Department to Private Toby Perea, United States Army. While attached to the Medical Department at the Davao Penal Colony, American Prisoner of War Camp No. 2, in the Philippine Islands, performed a gallant act of heroism in August 1943. A psychopathic patient attempted to commit suicide by jumping into a well in the prison compound. Private Perea, although not on duty at the time, lowered himself through a narrow opening into the well and kept the patient’s head above water for a period of nearly 10 minutes until it was possible to remove the covering of the well and lower a ladder. This act of heroism on the part of Private Perea was done with great risk to his own life, since the man whom he aided in rescuing was far larger than himself, and was endowed at the time with abnormal strength because of his peculiar physical condition. Private Perea, while a prisoner at this camp gave his time generously to the sick, both while on and off duty. He lost his life while being transferred by the Japanese when the prison ship on which he was traveling was sunk on 7 September 1944.
General Orders: General Order number 106, War Department, 20 November 1945

PIERCE, WILLIAM G.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 May 1959
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class William G. Pierce, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of the 60th Field Hospital, Fort Lewis, Wash., distinguished himself by heroism at Tacoma, Wash., on 27 may 1959. Upon being informed by a group of children that a little girl had fallen from the old Tacoma Dock, Tacoma, Wash., without hesitation or concern for his own safety and being completely unfamiliar with the depth and possible under currents, Sergeant Pierce removed his spectacles without which he has only 20/400 vision, and dived into the water under the pier to rescue the victim. In the approaching darkness he was forced to rise to the surface and dive a totatl of three times to a depth of between 10 to 15 feet in murky water with a strong outgoing tide, before the submerged and unconscious victim was finally located. He then swam with the victim to floating dock where a fellow soldier lifted the child up and onto the float. Sergeant Pierce then administered artificial respiration until police and fire department personnel arrived. Sergeant Pierce’s prompt and courageous action saved the little girl from drowning, and reflects distinct credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 33, Department of the Army, 10 September 1959

RABEN, MAURICE S.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, Harvard Army Air Field
Date of Action: 24 October 1944
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Captain Maurice S. Raben, Medical Corps, Medical Detachment, Army of the United States. For heroism at Harvard Army Air Field, Harvard, Nebraska, on 24 October 1944. An Army airplane crashed and burst into flame and its practice bombs exploded. Captain Raben, with complete disregard for his own safety, twice entered the radar compartment of the burning aircraft in search of members of the crew thought to be trapped in the wreckage. In the performance of these acts he sustained first degree burns.
General Orders: General Order number 7, War Department, 1 February 1945

RADDATZ, LENARD
Private First Class, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 17 April 1954
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private First Class Lenard Raddatz, Army Medical Service, United States Army, a member of the 5015th Army Service Unit, Camp Atturbury, Indiana, distinguished himself by heroism at Edinburg, Indiana, on 17 April 1954. While driving home, he noticed an open excavation of the street. He stopped at the scene and saw a man helplessly trapped at the bottom of the excavation. The victim was submerged up to his chin in the mud and water at the bottom of the pit. Because of a broken high pressure water main, caused by a cave in of the walls of the excavation, the water and mud continued to rise. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private Raddatz unhesitatingly entered the pit and attempted to stem the flow of water by improvised means. He succeeded in checking the flow of water until the supply was turned off, and then assisted in freeing the trapped man from the mud and removing him to a place of safety. Private Raddatz’s alert and courageous action in the face of grave danger reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 53, Department of the Army, 9 July 1954

ROUT, RONALD A.
Private First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 22 February 1957
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Private First Class Ronald A. Rout, Army Medical Service, United States Army, distinguished himself by heroism following the crash landing of a C-124 aircraft on a sandbar in the Han River Estuary on 22 February 1957. After the crash landing he assembled injured personnel, collected dry clothing and treated the survivors for shock and exposure to the icy water. The immediate and effective assistance rendered by Private Rout prior to the arrival of qualified medical Personnel prevented serious injury to many of the survivors. His unselfish and heroic actions were accomplished with complete disregard for his own safety or comfort and were rendered exceedingly difficult because of freezing cold, darkness and danger of being swept into the current by the steadily rising and fast flowing tide waters. Debris scattered about the crash site and jagged edges on the plane created an additional hazard to his personal safety. Private Rout’s exemplary action during this hazardous incident is indicative of a high degree of leadership ability and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 56, Department of the Army, 28 October 1957

SANCHEZ, LIBRADO P.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 4 November 1956
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Librado P. Sanchez, Army Medical Service, United States Army, Chief Technician, Aid Station, 1st Battalion, 21st Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroism Near Oui-Dong, Korea, on 4 November 1956. Upon learning that a fellow soldier had stepped on an anti-personnel mine and lay injured in an uncharted minefield, Sergeant Sanchez immediately proceeded to the scene of the accident. Despite the lack of a safe lane or mine detector, he courageously entered the hazardous area, made his precarious way to the suffering man and stemmed profuse bleeding by means of a tourniquet. After administering emergency aid, he assisted in evacuating the helpless man by litter to an awaiting ambulance for removal to a collecting station for further treatment. Sergeant Sanchez’ quick thinking and valorous actions resulted in the saving of a comrade’s life, reflecting utmost credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 39, Department of the Army, 31 July 1957

SCARPA, FRANK V.
Technician Fifth Grade, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 1882d Service Command Unit, Texas
Date of Action: 7 May 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Technician Fifth Grade Frank V. Scarpa, Medical Detachment, 1882d Service Command Unit, Army of the United States, risked his life at the Regional Hospital, Camp Maxey, Texas on 7 May 1945, when he subdued a soldier who was terrorizing a group of patients in the dispensary. In the face of threats from the unbalanced soldier, who was armed with a loaded M1 rifle, he fearlessly closed with the intruder and disarmed him. By his prompt action and cool courage, technician Scarpa saved bystanders from possible death or injury.
General Orders: General Order number 64, War Department, 4 August 1945

SCOTT, THOMAS I.
Specialist Fifth Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 8 May 1959
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Five Thomas I. Scott, United States Army, a medical corpsman of the 215th General Dispensary, distinguished himself by heroism at Trois Fontaines, France on 8 May 1959. In response to an ambulance call, Specialist Scott found a soldier pinned and completely hidden under an overturned Army Engineer gradeall excavator. As three wrecker units strained to raise the huge piece of equipment in an effort to free the trapped man, gasoline and oil spilled from the machine, further increasing the danger involved. Immediately after the overstrained wrecker units had hoisted the vehicle approximately six inches, Specialist Scott dropped to the ground and worked himself under the several suspended tons of metal through broken glass, spilled gasoline and debris and managed to reach the injured man. Without regard for his own personal safety and with the full understanding that the slightest human or mechanical failure would be fatal for him, Specialist Scott persisted in his efforts until he freed the pinned operator and assisted him to safety. The high sense of duty, prompt courage, and brave actions displayed by Specialist Scott by risking his life in this emergency to save that of his fellow soldier are worthy of emulation, and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 38, Department of the Army, 12 October 1959

SHIERE, ROLAND L.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 7 October 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Sergeant First Class Roland L. Shiere, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Section, 554th Antiaircraft Artillery Missile Battalion (NIKE), distinguished himself by heroism on 7 October 1955 near Stanton, California. Sergeant First Class Shiere was summoned to the scene of an accident in which a civilian automobile had crashed into a large utility pole. The impact of the crash had sheared off the pole, leaving it precariously suspended by a single wire over the automobile. In addition, broken, but still “live” high voltage power lines were draped over an around the vehicle. Upon observing that the driver of the automobile was bleeding profusely from throat and arm wounds, Sergeant First Class Shiere, without regard for his own safety, entered the dangerous area to administer first aid to stem the flow of blood. He then supervised the removal of the injured person from the scene to a hospital. Sergeant First Class Shiere’s alertness and courage in the face of peril reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 33, Department of the Army, 24 June 1957

*SKINNER, CHARLES B.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 March 1944
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded posthumously by the War Department to Captain Charles B. Skinner, Medical Corps, United States Army. For heroism in Blackwater Canyon, near Davis, West Virginia, on 23 March 1944. During a training demonstration a soldier fell into the raging torrent of an icy mountain river. Captain Skinner, with utter disregard for his own safety, lost his life in attempting to rescue the soldier from the turbulent waters. Captain Skinner’s exemplary courage and devotion to his fellow soldier is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Army Medical Department and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 41, War Department, 26 may 1944

SMITH, BERTRAM
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 May 1941
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded by the War Department on 4 October 1941 to Sergeant Bertram Smith (then Private First Class), Medical Department, Army of the United States, displayed heroism in assisting in rescuing an enlisted man from drowning in Little Neck Bay, Fort Totten, New York, on 18 May 1941. When an enlisted man overturned in a boat about 50 yards from shore and was in grave danger of drowning, Sergeant Smith and four other enlisted men, upon seeing the man struggling in the water, with utter disregard for their safety, jumped into the rough water and swam out to him. With great difficulty they succeeded in bringing the unconscious man to shore, where he was revived by means of artificial respiration, thereby saving his life. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Smith on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and military service.
General Orders: General Order number 61, Department of the Army, 15 September 1948

STEPHENSON, ORAH D.
First Lieutenant, Army Nurse Corps, U.S. Army
Station Hospital, Morris Field, Charlotte, North Carolina
Date of Action: 9 November 1943
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to First Lieutenant Orah D. Stephenson, Army Nurse Corps, United States Army. For heroism as Chief Nurse, Station Hospital, Morris Field, Charlotte, North Carolina, on 9 November 1943. Awakened by the smell of smoke from a fire in the nurse’s quarters, Lieutenant Stephenson took immediate measures to arouse the other occupants of the building. Hearing a scream from one of the rooms she fought her way through smoke and flames and dragged to safety an unconscious nurse, much heavier than herself, through the burning hall. During this rescue, Lieutenant Stephenson received burns on the face and hands and was partly overcome by smoke. First Lieutenant Stephenson’s bravery, heroism, and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon herself, the Army Nurse Corps, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 11, War Department, 7 February 1944

STINSON, HOWARD JR.
Technician Fifth Grade, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 12 November 1943
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Technician Fifth Grade Howard Stinson Jr., Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 12 November 1943, while a member of Medical Department, United States Army. Technician Fifth Grade Stinson’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 9, War Department, 24 January 1944

STODDARD, DAVID H.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 9 July 1947
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain David H. Stoddard, Medical Corps, Army of the United States, displayed heroism at Giebelstadt, Germany, on 9 July 1947. Upon witnessing a crash landing of a B-29 and realizing that some of the crew members were trapped in the aircraft, he heroically and voluntarily entered the wreckage at the risk of his life, despite the imminent possibility of explosion because of leaking gasoline. Captain Stoddard’s efforts resulted in the rescue of several of the trapped men and his heroism reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 6, Department of the Army, 1 February 1949

SULLIVAN, JOHN J.
Technician Fourth Grade, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
1247th Service Command Unit, 2nd Service Command Hospital Trains
Date of Action: 3 April 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Technician Fourth Grade John J. Sullivan, Army Medical Department, 1247th Service Command Unit, 2nd Service Command Hospital Trains, Army of the United States, assisted in saving an 8 year old girl from drowning at New Dorp Beach, Staten Island, New York, on 3 April 1945, after the child had been swept 300 yards to sea on a small raft. Braving chilling waters, Technician Sullivan plunged into the surf and swam to the raft. With the help of another soldier, he kept the frail craft from capsizing and struggled to push it shoreward against a strong ebb tide until rescued by other soldiers in a boat. By his daring and complete disregard for his own life, Technician Sullivan was largely responsible for keeping the child from being thrown into the sea and for her ultimate rescue.
General Orders: General Order number 43, War Department, 30 May 1945

TALBOT, JOHN M.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 9 December 1940
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded by the War Department on 15 October 1941 to Lieutenant Colonel John M. Talbot, (then Captain), Medical Corps, United States Army, displayed heroism in extricating an enlisted man from an overturned airplane on 9 December 1940, at Clear Lake, California. When an OA-9 airplane in which Colonel Talbot was on duty as flight surgeon went out of control, crashed, and overturned in the lake about 1 ½ miles from shore, Colonel Talbot, finding himself in an upside down position suspended by his safety belt, observed that a man was lying unconscious below him crosswise of the fuselage and in grave danger of drowning. With utter disregard for his safety, in the face of inrushing water and imminent sinking of the airplane, Colonel Talbot immediately unfastened his safety belt, removed the unconscious man from the submerged cabin, and brought him to the surface of the water, undoubtedly saving his life. Although suffering from immersion and shock, with great presence of mind Colonel Talbot clambered about administering first aid to the badly wounded crew members. Fearing immediate sinking of the airplane, he then attempted to brave the cold water and swim ashore for help, but becoming exhausted, was forced to return to the airplane.
General Orders: General Order number 58, Department of the Army, 30 August 1948

VOGEL, WILLIAM
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 4 July 1943
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department to Sergeant William Vogel, United States Army. Sergeant Vogel rescued two companions from heavy surf and a powerful undertow at Jaque, Republic of Panama, on 4 July 1943, after the trio had been swept 250 yards to sea. Through treacherous currents and battering waves, he swam with one man to the temporary safety of a sand bar, and then struggled 75 yards to the other man and supported him until they reached shallow water. The soldier left on the sand bar was once more swept to sea and knocked unconscious by waves 15 feet high. Unhesitatingly, Sergeant Vogel swam to the spot where he had disappeared, dived, brought him to the surface and laboriously towed him to shore. By his heroic bravery and remarkable endurance, Sergeant Vogel saved the lives of two fellow soldiers.
General Orders: General Order number 117, War Department, 11 December 1945

WALPER, PERRY E.
Technician Fourth Grade, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 June 1943
Citation Narrative Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Technician Fourth Grade Perry E. Walper, Army Medical Department, United States Army for heroism on 27 June 1943, while a member of Medical Department, United States Army. For heroism along the banks of the Potomac River on 27 June 1943. Technician Fourth Grade Walper’s valiant conduct and swift action in this hazardous situation are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 86, War Department, 23 December 1943

WEISER, SEYMOUR
Technician Third Grade, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 20 April 1941
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded by the War Department on 22 October 1941 to Technician Third Grade Seymour Weiser (then Private), Medical Department, Army of the United States, displayed heroism in rescuing a small girl from drowning near the station hospital at Fort Jay, New York, on 20 April 1941. Upon seeing a small girl ride her bicycle over the seawall into approximately 7 feet of water, in the rear of the station hospital where he was a convalescent patient, Technician Weiser immediately jumped into the water, fully clothed, and pulled the girl to shallow water. With the help of the girl’s father, she was returned to the top of the wall. By presence of mind and prompt exemplary action, Technician Weiser prevented the girl from being thrown against the rocks at the foot of the wall by the tide, and his act resulted in saving her life. The courage and presence of mind displayed by Technician Weiser on this occasion reflect great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 61, Department of the Army, 15 September 1948

WILSON, ALBERT F.
Staff Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 5 September 1944
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Staff Sergeant Albert F. Wilson (then Technician Fifth Grade), Medical Department, Army of the United States, a member of the 147th Quartermaster Battalion (DUKW), displayed heroism in southern France on 5 September 1944. Sighting a 6 by 6 amphibian truck speeding and being driven in a reckless manner, racing through the narrow roads and villages, and forcing pedestrians and cars to flee, he voluntarily climbed to the front bumper of the jeep in which he was riding, leaped onto the bouncing truck, and successfully brought it to a halt hardly 20 feet from a group of small children who were in grave danger of being run over. The heroic conduct of Sergeant Wilson reflects great credit on himself and the Army of the United States.
General Orders: General Order number 5, Department of the Army, 7 October 1947

WINDON, ROBERT L.
Technician Fifth Grade, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, SS Bienville
Date of Action: 26 January 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Technician Fifth Grade Robert L. Windon, Army Medical Department, Medical Detachment, Army of the United States, was a ward attendant on the SS Bienville on 26 January 1945 when this transport lay at anchor at the 14th Port of Embarkation in European waters. Seeing an ill soldier elude another ward attendant and jump overboard in attempted suicide, he immediately plunged into the water to effect a rescue. Despite the strong tide, choppy seas, and icy waters, with the help of his fellow attendant who also dived overboard, he succeeded in saving the sick soldier. The heroic action of Technician Windon, at the risk of his own life, saved the patient from drowning.
General Orders: General Order number 38, War Department, 16 May 1945

WYMER, RALPH M.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 23 October 1950
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Captain Ralph M. Wymer, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Company, 112th Infantry Regiment, distinguished himself by heroism at Camp Atterbury, Indiana. On 23 October 1950, a civilian lineman working on a power line touched a live wire and suffered severe shock. Seeing the man suspended by his safety belt, with clothing afire, Captain Wymer, without hesitation, climbed the ladder, put out the fire, and attempted to cut the live wire. When the poser was finally turned off and the victim lowered to the ground, he administered first aid treatment. Captain Wymer’s courageous act reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 16, Department of the Army, 20 March 1951

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