U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

Soldier's Medal, 1940-1959, A-L

Soldier's Medal

Interesting Notes:

Captain Robert Franco earned the Silver Star the same day he earned his Soldier’s Medal.

Lieutenant Edith Ellen Greenwood was the first female recipient of the Soldier’s Medal.

Major Harold A. Endler’s quick thinking saved the life of a fellow Soldier and possibly his own during an airborne operation.

Private Marie Lavrich saved a fellow Women's Army Corps Soldier from drowning

* Indicates Posthumous Award

1940 - 1959

ADAMS, LOYD E.
Technician Fifth Grade, Medical Department, U.S. Army
1247th Service Command Unit, 2d Service Command Hospital Trains
Date of Action: 3 April 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Technician Fifth Grade Loyd E. Adams, Army Medical Department, 1247th Service Command Unit, 2nd Service Command Hospital Trains, Army of the United States, assisted by fellow soldiers, saved an 8 year old girl from drowning at New Dorp Beach, Staten Island, New York, on 3 April 1945, after the child had been swept 300 yards to sea on a small raft. Braving chilling waters, Technician Adams plunged into the surf and swam to the raft. With the help of another soldier, he kept the frail craft from capsizing and struggled to push it shoreward against a strong ebb tide until rescued by other soldiers in a boat. By his daring and complete disregard for his own life, Technician Adams was largely responsible for keeping the child from being thrown into the sea and for her ultimate rescue.
General Orders: General Order number 44, War Department, 6 June 1945

BAILIFF, FINLEY
Private, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 September 1955
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Private Finley Bailiff, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of Company “A”, 73d Tank Battalion, for heroism on 18 September 1955, near Taejon-ni, Korea. While off duty, Private Bailiff learned that three American servicemen lay injured in a mine field, and quickly proceeded to the scene of the accident to assist in rescue operations. During the hours of darkness, and fully aware of the danger involved, Private Bailiff unhesitatingly probed through dense brush and over-hanging vegetation and, with the help of a comrade, evacuated one of the ill-fated soldiers to safety. After administering emergency treatment to the suffering man, Private Bailiff headed an aid team and, entering the mined area a second and third time, rescued the other two casualties. Then he carefully surveyed the hazardous area for an alleged fourth victim, and repeated his search the following day to insure that no one was left in the mine field. Private Bailiff’s intrepidity and prompt, courageous actions reflect utmost credit on himself and upholds the honored traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 10, Department of the Army

BARBETTI, REYNALD A.
Private First Class, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 65th Infantry Battalion
Date of Action: 11 December 1944
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Private First Class Reynald A. Barbetti, Army Medical Department, Medical Detachment, 65th Infantry Battalion, Army of the United States. For heroism at Camp Campbell, Kentucky, on 11 December 1944. With complete disregard for his own safety Private Barbetti advanced to and procured a loaded rifle and other ammunition from a member of his platoon who had become hysterical or mentally unbalanced and who was firing wildly, thus endangering the lives of several men and officers
General Orders: General Order number 17, War Department, 13 March 1945

BEITTEL, CHARLES F.
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Company A, 122d Medical Battalion
Date of Action: 19 June 1944
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department to Sergeant Lennie A. Bothe, Medical Department, United States Army. For heroism near Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, on 19 June 1944. A 2 ½ ton Army truck left the road on a high fill and turned upside down pinning five enlisted men beneath it. The truck was insecurely resting on gravel and there was great danger that it would slip and crush the men under it. There was the added danger of fire or fumes from the gasoline saturated ground. Sergeant Beittel with utter disregard for his own safety and at the risk of his life crawled under the tuck and with the assistance of another soldier removed the dead and injured men.
General Orders: General Order number 77, War Department, 28 September 1944

BOTHE, LENNIE A.
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Company A, 122d Medical Battalion
Date of Action: 19 June 1944
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department to Sergeant Lennie A. Bothe, Medical Department, United States Army. For heroism near Camp Gruber, Oklahoma, on 19 June 1944. A 2 ½ ton Army truck left the road on a high fill and turned upside down pinning five enlisted men beneath it. The truck was insecurely resting on gravel and there was great danger that it would slip and crush the men under it. There was the added danger of fire or fumes from the gasoline saturated ground. Sergeant Bothe with utter disregard for his own safety and at the risk of his life crawled under the tuck and with the assistance of another soldier removed the dead and injured men.
General Orders: General Order number 77, War Department, 28 September 1944

BOULEY, RAYMOND J.
Staff Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 February 1941
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department on 11 October 1941 to Staff Sergeant Raymond J. Bouley (then Private), Medical Department, United States Army, displayed heroism in rescuing an enlisted man from drowning in the Pacora River, in the Republic of Panama, on 15 February 1941. While two men were in wading about 30 feet from shore, one of them suddenly stepped into a deep hole beyond his depth and, unable to swim, was in grave danger of drowning. His companion endeavored to rescue him but was unable to do so and both were clinging frantically to each other when Sergeant Bouley noticed their predicament. With complete disregard for his safety, Sergeant Bouley plunged into the river, swam out to the struggling men, and, with great difficulty, succeeded in separating them. He then swam back to shore with one of the men, who was semiconscious, and thereby saved his life. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Bouley on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 61, Department of the Army, 15 September 1948

CHURUTI, JOSEPH J.
Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 18 May 1941
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department on 4 October 1941 to Sergeant Joseph J. Churuti, (then Private First Class), Medical Department, Army of the United States, displayed heroism in assisting in rescuing an enlisted man from drowning in Little Neck Bay, Fort Totten, New York, on 18 May 1941. When an enlisted man overturned in a boat about 50 yards from shore and was in grave danger of drowning, Sergeant Churuti and four other enlisted men, upon seeing the man struggling in the water, with utter disregard for their safety, jumped into the rough water and swam out to him. With great difficulty they succeeded in bringing the unconscious man to shore, where he was revived by means of artificial respiration, thereby saving his life. The heroism displayed by Sergeant Churuti on this occasion reflects great credit on himself and military service.
General Orders: General Order number 71, Department of the Army, 29 October 1948

COWART, JAMES M.
Staff Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 1882d Service Command Unit, Regional Hospital, Camp Maxey, Texas
Date of Action: 10 June 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department to Staff Sergeant James M. Cowart, United States Army. While attached to the Medical Detachment, 1882d Service Command Unit, Regional Hospital, Camp Maxey, Texas. On 10 June 1945, while at a lake near the camp, went to the aid of two civilians, a man and his 12 year old son, who, unable to swim, were struggling in the deep water some distance from shore. Both father and son had become panic stricken and grappled with Sergeant Cowart as he swam to them, pulling him under water, but the latter freed himself and brought first the boy and then the man to safety. Sergeant Cowart’s act of saving two persons from drowning at the risk of his life reflects great credit on himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 106, War Department, 20 November 1945

CROWDER, LYLE C.
Private, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 334th Infantry, United States Army
Date of Action: 21 December 1943
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded by the War Department to Private Lyle C. Crowder, Army Medical Department, United States Army. For heroism on 21 December 1943 at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. Private Crowder was crawling with other members of the 334th Infantry under fire of caliber .30 machine guns on the night infiltration course at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. During one burst of fire he felt a sting on his left arm. Private William M. Bobby, Company K, 334th Infantry, who was next to Private Crowder, cried out that he had been hit. Private Crowder went to Private Bobby, ascertained that he had been wounded, crawled to the nearest trench to notify a control officer therein and, still under fire, returned with a medical officer whom he assisted in rendering aid to the wounded man. Subsequent examination revealed that Private Crowder had himself been wounded in the left arm by a fragment of machine gun bullet. His behavior on that occasion demonstrated his possession of the soldierly qualities of presence of mind, coolness under fire, and devotion to duty under trying circumstances.
General Orders: General Order number 31, War Department, 17 April 1944

DICKSTEIN, BENJAMIN
Major, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
52d Troop Carrier Squadron, I Troop Carrier Command
Date of Action: 16 September 1942
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Major Benjamin Dickstein, (then First Lieutenant), Medical Corps, Army of the United States, when flight surgeon of the 52d Troop Carrier Squadron, I Troop carrier Command, heroically went to the rescue of the crew and passengers of a troop carrier transport which crashed and burned in a night take-off, 16 September 1942, at Pope Field, Fort Bragg, North Carolina. At the risk of his life, he repeatedly entered the burning wreckage and with the assistance of one other extricated 14 injured and helpless men. A short distance from the wreck he administered first aid to the badly injured victims, continuing with this work even when the airplane exploded and showered him with burning debris. Major Dickstein, with great courage and complete disregard for personal safety, saved the lives of several of his comrades.
General Orders: General Order number 63, War Department, 1 August 1945

DONAHUE, EDWARD L.
Warrant Officer Junior Grade, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 19 March 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Warrant Officer Junior Grade Edward L. Donahue, United States Army, while a member of the Medical Detachment, 6941 Army Service Unit, Camp San Luis Obispo, California, distinguished himself by heroism at Baywood Park, California, on 1 November 1952. While he and friends were gathering abalones among the rocks jutting out from the beach into the ocean, a high wave came in unexpectedly, forcing them to seek a position of relative safety on top of the rocks to avoid being carried out to sea. He observed that one companion had been swept off the high rocks by the large swell and carried approximately 150 feet out into the treacherous waters. Realizing that his companion was unable to swim and in grave danger of drowning, without regard for his personal safety, Mr. Donahue unhesitatingly entered the turbulent surf and fought his way against great odds to effect the rescue of the distressed friend. Although his progress was greatly impeded by his heavy shoes and clothing, after determined effort he reached the victim and finally succeeded in bringing her to a place of safety on the beach. Mr. Donahue’s quick thinking and his prompt and courageous action reflect great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 53, Department of the Army, 9 July 1954

EDDY, HOWARD R.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 26 February 1947
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the periods indicated is awarded to Captain Howard R. Eddy, (then First Lieutenant), Medical Corps, Army of the United States, distinguished himself by heroic action, on 26 February 1947, at Keesler Field, Mississippi. With utter disregard for personal safety, he assisted in the successful rescue of the trapped crew members of a burning aircraft that has crashed on the field. His courageous actions were highly commendable and reflect great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 55, Department of the Army, 30 December 1949

ENDLER, HAROLD A.
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 June 1956
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Major Harold A. Endler, Medical Service Corps, United States Army, while a member of the XVIII Airborne Corps, distinguished himself by heroism during a mass tactical exercise on 27 June 1956, at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. When another jumper, whose parachute did not open, became enmeshed in Major Endler’s suspension lines, Major Endler took immediate command of the situation. Realizing that if the man deployed his reserve parachute within such close proximity it would possibly cause his own parachute to collapse, Major Endler instructed the jumper to grasp his suspension lines and the two descended safely to the ground on Major Endler’s parachute. The prompt and decisive action taken by Major Endler, with the full knowledge that the additional weight on his parachute was a risk to his own life, prevented a fatal jump. Major Endler’s heroic conduct and unselfish action were undoubtedly instrumental in saving a fellow paratrooper from serious injury or death thereby reflecting the utmost credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 15, Department of the Army, 2 May 1958

FORD, JAMES F.
Private, Medical Department, U.S. Army
37th Station Hospital, Yuma, Arizona
Date of Action: 17 April 1943
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President of the United States, The Soldier’s Medal is awarded to Private James F. Ford, Army Medical Department, United States Army. At 0630 on April 17, 1943 a stove exploded in the 37th Station Hospital’s diet kitchen, setting fire to the nearby ward where Private Ford was assisting Lieutenant Greenwood overseeing the care of 15 patients. Greenwood sounded the alarm and attempted to extinguish the blaze with the help of Private Ford, but the fire quickly spread, with reports indicating that the ward burned down within five minutes. Greenwood and Ford safely evacuated all of their patients. By direction of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, both Greenwood and Ford were awarded the Soldier’s Medal on June 10, 1943.
General Orders: An Encyclopedia of American Women at War: From the Home Front to the Battlefields

FRANCO, ROBERT
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 27 June 1944
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the date indicated is awarded to Captain Robert Franco, Medical Corps, United States Army, a member of Medical Detachment, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division, distinguished himself by heroism on 27 June 1944 near Varenguebec, France. On that date an ammunition truck caught fire and munitions subsequently started exploding.  Everyone ran to get under whatever cover they could find to escape the carnage. Captain Franco observed a soldier who could not escape the vehicle. Captain Franco, with complete disregard for his own personal safety, ran to the exploding vehicle and succeeded in freeing the trapped soldier and moved him to a place of relative safety where he tended to his wounds. Captain Franco’s actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect highly on himself, the 82d Infantry Division and the United States Army.
General Orders: General orders needed
* Captain Franco earned the Silver Star the same day he earned this Soldier’s Medal

GREENWOOD, EDITH ELLEN
Lieutenant, Army Nurse Corps, U.S. Army
37th Station Hospital, Yuma, Arizona
Date of Action: 17 April 1943
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President of the United States, The Soldier’s Medal is awarded to Lieutenant Edith Ellen Greenwood, Army Nurse Corps, United States Army. At 0630 on April 17, 1943 a stove exploded in the 37th Station Hospital’s diet kitchen, setting fire to the nearby ward where Lieutenant Greenwood was responsible for overseeing the care of 15 patients. Greenwood sounded the alarm and attempted to extinguish the blaze, but the fire quickly spread, with reports indicating that the ward burned down within five minutes. Greenwood safely evacuated all of her patient with the assistance of a young ward attendant, Private James F. Ford. By direction of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, both Greenwood and Ford were awarded the Soldier’s Medal on June 10, 1943.
General Orders: An Encyclopedia of American Women at War: From the Home Front to the Battlefields

HOHE, KENNETH W.
Specialist Fourth Class, Army Medical Service, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 June 1959
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Specialist Four Kenneth W. Hohe, United States Army, a member of Medical Detachment, United States Army Hospital, Asmara, Eritrea, Ethiopia, distinguished himself by heroism on 15 June 1959. Specialist Hohe was a passenger in a jeep carrying United States Mail and following another vehicle over a rugged and winding mountainous road from Massawa to Asmara, Eritrea. As the vehicle rounded a curve, five road bandits armed with rifles stopped it, forced the passengers to dismount and searched and relieved them of personal items. The jeep rounded the bend shortly thereafter and, spotting the bandits and quickly realizing the precarious position, the members of the second party stopped approximately 75 feet from the lead vehicle. When the bandits approached the jeep, the driver raised and fired his pistol, hitting the nearest bandit in the abdomen and knocking him to the ground. Without hesitation or concern for his own personal safety, Specialist Hohe drew his pistol and began firing at the remaining bandits who, after attempting to return the fire, fled over the retaining wall by the roadside. Specialist Hohe’s prompt response and presence of mind aided in repelling the bandits, prevented the loss of United States Government property and Mail and saved the party from the vicious action of bandits known in this area by their ruthless activity. His courageous efforts in this dangerous situation are worthy of emulation, and reflect distinct credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 43, Department of the Army, 4 December 1959

HOLZ, EDWARD G.
Technician Fifth Grade, Army Medical Department, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, SS Bienville
Date of Action: 26 January 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Technician Fifth Grade Edward G. Holz, Army Medical Department, Medical Detachment, Army of the United States, was a ward attendant on the SS Bienville on 26 January 1945 when this transport lay at anchor at the 14th Port of Embarkation in European waters. Seeing an ill soldier jump overboard in attempted suicide, he unhesitatingly plunged into the water to effect a rescue. Despite the strong tide, choppy seas, and icy waters, with the help of a comrade who swam to assist him, he succeeded in saving the sick soldier. The heroic action of Technician Holz, at the risk of his own life, saved the patient from drowning.
General Orders: General Order number 38, War Department, 16 May 1945

LABEUR, LEONARD
Master Sergeant, Medical Department, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 19 March 1951
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the period indicated is awarded to Master Sergeant Leonard LaBeur, Medical Department, United States Army, a member of the 6516th Army Service Unit, University of Washington ROTC Instructor Detachment, distinguished himself by heroism at Ketchikan, Alaska, on 19 March 1951. A fellow soldier had stumbled in the darkness an fallen over the edge of the Coast Guard dock into the water, striking his head against the side of the United States Coast Guard cutter Citrus as he fell. Without regard for his own safety, Sergeant LaBeur, without hesitation, jumped from the dock, approximately 20 feet down into the icy and debris-cluttered water, found his comrade in the darkness, and held the head of the unconscious soldier above the water until both were pulled up to safety by members of the crew of the Citrus. The prompt and courageous action taken by Sergeant LaBeur in the face of grave danger saved the life of his comrade and reflects great credit on himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 85, Department of the Army, 25 September 1951

LAVRICH, MARIE
Private First Class, Women’s Army Corps, U.S. Army
1234th Service Command Unit, WAC Detachment
Date of Action: 22 July 1945
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Private First Class Marie Lavrich, 1234th Service Command Unit, WAC Detachment, Army of the United States, stationed at the Army Service Forces Convalescent Hospital, Camp Upton, New York, went to the aid of a drowning fellow WAC who was being carried out in rough water by a strong undertow at West Hampton Beach, New York, on 22 July 1945. Swimming through the high waves and surf for approximately 100 feet, she reached the helpless WAC and pulled her safely to shore, after two others had made gallant but unsuccessful attempts to save the drowning woman. Private Lavrich’s heroic act reflects great credit on herself and the Women’s Army Corps.
General Orders: General Order number 80, War Department, 19 September 1945

LUEKENS, CLAUDE A. JR.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 25 May 1958
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the act of Congress, approved 2 July 1926 (WD Bul. 8, 1926), the Soldier’s Medal for heroism not involving actual conflict with an enemy during the dates indicated is awarded to Captain Claude A. Luekens, Jr., Medical Corps, United States Army, while Commanding Officer, 12th Medical Dispensary General, United States Forces, distinguished himself by heroism on 25 May 1958. While on the bank of the Loisach River near Garmisch, Germany, Captain Luekens observed a German national being swept downstream in the extremely swift waters of a very dangerous stretch of rapids containing many huge boulders. Without hesitation and with complete disregard for his own personal safety, he ran down a distance of approximately 300 yards along the bank of the river in an effort to overtake the victim. He entered the treacherous water to a depth of 3 ½ feet and managed to drag the downing man, 20 pounds heavier than himself, onto the bank where he immediately administered artificial respiration to the unconscious man who had stopped breathing. As a result of Captain Luckens’ prompt action, the victim was revived and taken to a hospital where he completely recovered. Captain Luekens’ presence of mind and courageous and unselfish action in risking his life in this extremely hazardous situation saved a fellow man from drowning, and reflect great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: General Order number 36, Department of the Army, 12 November 1958

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