U.S. Army Medical Department, Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

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ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

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AMEDD Silver Star, WWII

AMEDD Silver Star > WWII

Interesting Notes:

Technician Fifth Grade Henry Finseth evacuated casualties for nearly 60 hours over the course of 3 days.

Technician Third Grade Bernard Friedenberg is a double recipient of the Silver Star.

When Technician Fifth Grade Leonard Goldman’s platoon was overrun by the enemy and forced to withdraw, he stayed behind to care for the wounded. He successfully negotiated with the Germans to release American wounded and he would then care for German injured. He remained a POW until the end of the war.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

FACTOR, HAROLD E.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 254th Infantry Regiment, 63rd Infantry Division
Date of Action: 23 January 1945
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Harold E. Factor (ASN: 36831491), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Medical Detachment, 254th Infantry Regiment, 63d Infantry Division, in action on 23 January 1945, in the vicinity of Bennwihr, France. Technician Fifth Grade Factor was Aid Man attached to Company M in an attack on Hill 216. When he observed aid men of the rifle companies of his battalion becoming casualties from schu-mines, he courageously volunteered to render aid to the casualties and moved from man to man under small arms, mortar and artillery fire, braving the ever present danger of schu-mines. His outstanding gallantry and will to aid these men reflect great credit upon the Medical Corps.
General Orders: Headquarters, 63d Infantry Division, General Orders No. 71 (March 31, 1945)
Home of Record: Chicago, Illinois

FAVORITE, RAY A.
Private, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 30th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 29 July 1944
Citation:
Under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, and pursuant to authority contained in paragraph 4, Section I, circular 66, Headquarters First United States Army, 18 May 1944, the Silver Star is awarded to Private Ray A. Favorite, Medical Corps, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 29 July 1944, in France.  Private Favorite was assigned to duty as medical Aid man with an infantry unit.  During a tactical operation when his organization was subjected to heavy enemy artillery fire, many casualties resulted.  Private Favorite unhesitatingly walked through the barrage from man to man, administering first aid and directing the evacuation of the more grievously wounded.  By his coolness under fire and superior efficiency, he undoubtedly saved the lives of at least five of his comrades, and gave comfort and succor to many others.  The personal courage and unselfish devotion to duty displayed by Private Favorite reflects great credit on himself and the Armed forces.
General Orders:  General Order number 55, Headquarters, 30th Infantry Division, 13 September 1944
Home of Record: Ohio

FEBBRARO, ANTHONY A.
Captain, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 359th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  12 June 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure  in presenting the Silver Star  to Captain (Medical Corps), [then First Lieutenant] Anthony A. Febbraro (ASN: 0-472066), United States Army, for gallantry in action in northern France while serving as a Medical Officer with the 359th Infantry Regiment, 90th Infantry Division. On 12 June 1944 when the unit with which he was serving came under heavy artillery and mortar fire, it suffered a large number of
casualties. Captain Febbraro had just arrived on the scene and had been unable to dig in his aid station when a large number of casualties were brought in. As the first patients began to arrive, enemy artillery and mortar fire began to fall in the area. Four of the casualties were in such serious condition that they could not be moved further without endangering their lives and blood plasma was required to be used immediately. Disregarding his own personal safety, Captain Febbraro with four other companions, remained in the shelled area to administer the blood plasma to the seriously wounded men and to render assistance to newly arriving casualties although the Infantry began falling back, leaving the position exposed. At times the fire was so intense that they were forced to lie on the ground for a period of thirty minutes beside the patients, administering the plasma. Sporadic fire continued to fall in the position and cold rain added to the discomfort. Captain Febbraro persisted in his efforts until he had evacuated a total of forty patients including twenty-four litter cases. The courageous action on the part of Captain Febbraro unquestionably saved the lives of at least four of the seriously wounded men and was a fine example of gallantry under fire, devotion to duty, and exemplified the finest traditions of the military spirit.

FELDMAN, AMANUEL
Captain, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 11th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Captain Amanuel Feldman, United States Army is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 38, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1944

FELIX, FLOYD
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 1st Armored Division
Action Date: 29 October – 3 November 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Floyd Felix (ASN: 15055834), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 1st Armored Division, from 29 October 1944 to 3 November 1944, on Hill 721, Torre de Nerone, Italy. During this period, Private First Class Felix, a Medical Aidman attached to Company B of an armored infantry battalion, exposed himself many times to both machine gun, artillery, and mortar fire above and beyond the call of duty. Despite this heavy enemy fire, Private First Class Felix remained forward, rendering first aid to the wounded and evacuating them to safer positions. On one occasion, Private First Class Felix was deprived of the assistance of the only other aid man present when his legs were pinned down by fallen debris. This, however, did not deter him in taking care of the many casualties inflicted on the company that day. He accomplished his task in spite of a severe concentrated enemy artillery barrage, including direct fire from at least one self-propelled gun. The courage, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty displayed by Private First Class Felix reflects the finest traditions of the armed forces and is worthy of the highest praise.
General Orders:  General Order 99, Headquarters, 1st Armored Division, December 19, 1944
Home of Record: Huntington, West Virginia

FERGUSON, BEN T.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 7th Armored Division
Action Date: 19 September 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Ben T. Ferguson, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 7th Armored Division, in action in France, on 19 September 1944. Private First Class Ferguson's gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:  General Order No 61, 10 October 1944
Home of Record:  North Carolina

FERRIER, PHILIP K.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 119th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  2 October 1944
Citation:
Under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, the Silver Star is awarded to Captain Philip K. Ferrier, Medical Department, 119th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 2 October 1944, in Holland.  During the assault on the Siegfried Line, Captain Ferrier established his aid station under direct observation of the enemy and intense hostile artillery, small arms and sniper fire.  Throughout the entire day Captain Ferrier exposed himself to the enemy action in order to give medical aid to the wounded and sought shelter only after they had been treated.  Captain Ferrier’s gallant actions resulted in prompt and efficient medical attention to many casualties.
General Orders:  General Order number 217, Headquarters, 30th Infantry Division, 16 November 1945
Home of Record:  California

FETTERMAN, VERNON D.
Technician Third Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 10th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Technician Third Grade Vernon D. Fetterman, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 10, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

FINSETH, HENRY T.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: February 11 - 13, 1945
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Henry T. Finseth (ASN: 36778275), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 11, 12 and 13 February 1945 in Luxembourg. During the crossing of the Our River near Hoesdorf, Luxembourg, on 11, 12 and 13 February 1945, numerous casualties were suffered by the assault troops from the intense artillery fire falling in the area. Leading a litter squad, Technician Fifth Grade Finseth, with complete disregard for his own life, directed and assisted in the removal of a large number of wounded men from the exposed banks of the river, working for nearly sixty hours at his voluntary mission. The personal bravery, perseverance, and sincere devotion to duty displayed by Technician Fifth Grade Finseth are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 116 (May 1, 1945)
Home of record: Illinois

*FLACK, EINAR
Private, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 26 September 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Einar Flack (ASN: 12157220), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 504th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division, in action against the enemy in Holland, on 26 September 1944.
General Orders:  General Order number 58, Headquarters, 82d Airborne Division, 29 October 1944
Home of Record:  Kings County, New York

FLETCHER, SAXTON W.
Private, U.S. Army
Company C, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 8 January 1945
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Saxton W. Fletcher (ASN: 42055734), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Company C, 505th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division, in action on 8 January 1945, at **** and near ****, Belgium. During the attack on ****, Private Fletcher, Company Aid Man, displayed exceptional bravery and outstanding devotion to duty in caring for the wounded of Company C. Heedless of heavy and accurate mortar and artillery fire, Private Fletcher constantly went about his work without regard for his personal safety. He worked on wounded under direct machine gun fire, many times shielding the wounded form enemy action with his own body. By his bravery and prompt medical aid he saved the lives of many wounded and instilled confidence in the men of his company. During a later phase of the operation, Private Fletcher's feet became frozen but he refused to make this known until the attack was over three days later. Private Fletcher's complete disregard for his own personal safety and his determination and devotion to duty exemplified the highest traditions of the Service.
General Orders:  General Order number 17, Headquarters, 82d Airborne Division, 15 February 1945
Home of Record:  White Plains, New York

FLINTZ, EDWIN O.
Private, U.S. Army
307TH Airborne Medical Company, 3d Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division
Date of Action: 19 – 24 September 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Edwin O. Flintz (ASN: 36628997), United States Army, for gallantry in action 19 - 24 September 1944, at ****, Holland. Private Flintz, a medical aid driver, 307th Airborne Medical Company, 3d Battalion, 508th Parachute Infantry Regiment, 82d Airborne Division. Private Flintz drove his vehicle over unsecured roads and to forward positions which were under direct enemy observation to evacuate wounded. When the 3d Battalion attacked enemy position in the vicinity of ****, Private Flintz drove his one-quarter ton vehicle through the area in order to reach casualties. On one occasion near **** he came under fierce fire from enemy flat trajectory artillery which landed in the road just behind his vehicle. He continued upon his mission and was able to remove several wounded men although continually under fire from this artillery. When the 3d Battalion, supported by tanks, attacked across the Filemon Flatlands, Private Flintz drove his vehicle over open ground and was able to assist the quick evacuation of casualties from exposed positions. Heavy enemy artillery stopped the attacking battalion and forced a withdrawal under covering fire from the tanks. While the battalion reorganized to resume the attack, Private Flintz and one other aid man continued to move about the fire-swept area and evacuated casualties, sometimes forward of the battalion's most advanced positions. The conduct of Private Flintz reflected much credit upon himself, his organization, and the Army of the United States.
General Orders:  General Order number 66, Headquarters, 82d Airborne Division, 20 December 1944
Home of Record:  Illinois

FLORES, JESUS C.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Jesus C. Flores, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 57, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1943

FLOYD, SILAS E.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 119th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  23 February 1945
Citation:
Under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, the Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Silas E. Floyd, Medical Department, 119th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 23 February 1945, in Germany.  Although he was suffering severely from blast injuries caused by an artillery shell which landed close by and killed on of the men of his platoon, Private Floyd continued to care for his wounded comrades until he had completed his work.  He braved murderous enemy fire during this entire period which lasted an hour.  Private Floyd’s gallant actions saved the lives of several of his comrades.
General Orders:  General Order number 224, Headquarters, 30th Infantry Division, 20 November 1945
Home of Record:  California

FOUGHT, PAUL E.
PFC, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: February 5, 1945
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Paul E. Fought (ASN: 36727642), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 5 February 1945 in Luxembourg. On the night of 5 February 1945, Private First Class Fought, an Aid Man, volunteered to accompany a patrol across the Sauer River into the Siegfried Line near Dillingen, Luxembourg. As their boat neared the enemy shore it was fired upon by enemy machine guns which wounded seven men, one of whom was Private First Class Fought. The enemy fire forced the patrol to return to the friendly side of the river where those who were able took cover. Disregarding his own safety and painful injuries, Private First Class Fought made six trips carrying and leading the wounded from the boat. His courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 78 (March 19, 1945)
Home of record: Illinois

FOULENFONT, FRANK G.
Private, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Private Frank G. Foulenfont, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 104, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1944

FOWLER, CLYDE M.
First Lieutenant, Medical Administrative Corps, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Clyde M. Fowler, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 111, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1944

FOX, LESTER I.
Major, U.S. Army
Medical Corps
Date of Action:  24 April 1942
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (then Captain), Lester I. Fox, United States Army for gallantry in action 24 April 1942 in action at Corregidor, Philippine Islands, during an enemy artillery bombardment of Battery Crockett, where he operated a battalion first-aid station.  When a shell crashed through the hoist room wall, setting fire to bedding and equipment and injuring several men, he left his station to aid the wounded.  At the same time, assuming command of the battery, Major Fox organized the able-bodied men to beat back the flames which dangerously threatened the powder rooms.  Two more shells burst within the battery, wounding most of the remaining men and severely injuring him and destroying his medical kit.  Doggedly, he dragged himself about helping the injured and trying to smother with a blanket the fires raging nearest the powder room doors, when another shell burst and further injured him.  Through his outstanding courage and determination, as seen by a rescue detail who later entered to find him semiconscious and still by the doors to the powder room, Major Fox did much to prevent a terrible explosion and loss of life in the battery emplacement.
General Orders: Department of the Army General Orders No 10, 24 October 1947

FOX, WILLIAM J.
PFC, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: November 11, 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class William J. Fox (ASN: 12220161), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 11 November 1944 in France. In the vicinity of Bacourt, France, on 11 November 1944, Private First Class Fox, an aid man, upon learning that three men lay seriously wounded on a hill three hundred yards to his front, advanced through intense artillery fire to treat their wounds and to carry them to safety. Again, with utter disregard for personal safety, he repeated his gallant deed by rescuing three more of his comrades. Finding that evacuation was impossible due to adverse weather conditions and lack of roads, he obtained blankets and overcoats and kept the casualties comfortable until morning when their evacuation was accomplished. His bravery and tireless devotion to duty saved the lives of many comrades and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 104 (April 16, 1945)
Home of record: New York

FRANCIS, CHARLES L.
Technician Fourth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 10th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Technician Fourth Grade Charles L. Francis, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 1, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

FRANCIS, LYLE
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Company B, 53d Armored Infantry Battalion, 4th Armored Division
Date of Action: 30 July 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Lyle Francis (ASN: 36070531), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company B, 53d Armored Infantry Battalion, 4th Armored Division, in action against an enemy of the United States on 30 July 1944, near Avranches, France. During the night and under excellent cover of darkness an enemy column of undetermined strength had proceeded up the main road toward Avranches and through the positions we were occupying. Heavy casualties were inflicted on the enemy causing them to retreat. Our casualties were very heavy. All during the action, Technician Fifth Grade Francis, Medical Aidman attached to the First Platoon, Company B, served both the first and third platoons, rendering such medical aid and evacuation that was necessary. During the entire action he exposed himself to enemy fire and at no time did he show any regard for his personal safety or the hazards of crossing the main road where most of the action had been taking place. During the course of this action and while stopping to give aid to enemy wounded, he was taken prisoner. In the subsequent action that followed, he was re-captured by elements of his own unit. Despite his experience, Technician Fifth Grade Francis, upon being freed, sought re-supply of equipment and continued with his mission of rendering aid to the wounded and assisting in the immediate evacuation. Technician Fifth Grade Francis' courage and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States.
General Orders: General Orders No 58, Headquarters, 4th Armored Division, 1944
Home of Record: Illinois

FRIEDENBERG, BERNARD I. (First Award)
Technician Third Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Action Date: 6-Jun-44
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Third Trade Bernard I. Friedenberg (ASN: 12034246), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Colleville-sur-Mer, Normandy, France, on 6 June 1944. At the risk of almost certain death, Sergeant Friedenberg advanced across a heavily strewn mine field and through an incessant hail of machine-gun fire to rescue several men who had been wounded while attempting to reach high ground. His valorous conduct saved the lives of his wounded comrades and served as a tremendous inspiration to all who bore witness to his dead. Technician Third Trade Friedenberg's gallant actions and selfless devotion to duty, without regard for his own safety, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 35 (July 12, 1944)
Home of record: Atlantic City, New Jersey

FRIEDENBERG, BERNARD I. (Second Award)
Technician Third Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Action Date: 19-Sep-44
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Technician Third Trade Bernard I. Friedenberg (ASN: 12034246), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, in action in the vicinity of Munsterbusch, Germany, on 19 September 1944. When the enemy's strategically situated machine guns and mortars covered the streets of Munsterbusch and subjected our troops to intense concentrations of fire, inflicting severe casualties, Sergeant Friedenberg fearlessly moved up and down exposed roads and, at the risk of his life rendered first aid and assisted in the evacuation of the wounded. Sergeant Friedenberg's gallant actions and unswerving devotion to duty exemplify the finest traditions of the Medical Department.
General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders No. 46 (1945)
Home of record: Atlantic City, New Jersey

*FUNK, JOSEPH
Major, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Medical Corps 30th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  28 July 1944
Citation:
Under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, and pursuant to authority contained in paragraph 4, Section I, circular 66, Headquarters First United States Army, 18 May 1944, the Silver Star is posthumously awarded to Major Joseph Funk, Medical Corps, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 29 July 1944 in France.  Major Funk was assigned to duty as surgeon for an artillery unit.  Enemy planes bombed the area, starting fires which were used as targets by succeeding waves of the hostile bombers.  Major Funk was summoned to attend the wounded of the first attack, and was preparing to respond when the second wave came over.  With utter disregard for his personal safety, and at the height of the second wave of bombins, Major Funk left the sanctuary of his shelter in response to the summons.  In attempting to give succor to the wounded Major Funk lost his life.  The unselfish devotion to duty displayed by Major Funk reflects great credit on himself and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the Armed Forces.
General Orders:  General Order number 37, Headquarters 30th Infantry Division, 15 August 1944
Home of Record:  New Jersey

FUNK, JOSEPH H. (POW)
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 119th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  10 July 1944
Citation:
Under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943, the Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class Joseph H. Funk, Medical Department, 119th Infantry Regiment, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 10 July 1944, in France.  Upon reaching the objective Private Funk’s company received a strong enemy counterattack and was forced to withdraw.  Private Funk and a comrade refused to withdraw but remained to render medical care to the wounded.  Despite the close proximity of the enemy they administered aid to a platoon leader who was severely wounded.  Although they were captured by the enemy their gallant and courageous actions were responsible for providing medical care despite extremely hazardous conditions.
General Orders:  General Order number 209, Headquarters, 30th Infantry Division, 8 November 1945
Home of Record:  California

FURUNO, YEICHI R.
Private, U.S. Army
Company E, 2d Battalion, 442d Regimental Combat Team, 34th Infantry Division
Action Date: 6-Jul-44
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private Yeichi R. Furuno (ASN: 30104821), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company E, 2d Battalion, 442d Regimental Combat Team, attached to the 34th Infantry Division, on 6 July 1944, in the vicinity of Castellina, Italy. When the platoon with which he was attached suffered heavy casualties from enemy machine gun, rifle, mortar and artillery fire, Private Furuno immediately had control of the situation. Seeing a man shot down 25 yards away, he rushed over to his aid. Discovering that the man had been killed instantly, he ran over to another wounded soldier 15 yards down the slope. The fact that the man was lying in the direct line of fire of the enemy did not cause him to hesitate. For a full half hour he worked, carrying his first aid kit from one wounded man to another, although in full exposure of the mortar and artillery shells bursting about him. He then immediately went into the adjoining area to assist the aid men of another company who were seriously in need of help. Private Furno's undaunted courage, faithful devotion to duty, and his willingness to risk his life saved the lives of several of his fellow comrades and was a source of inspiration to all who observed him.
General Orders: Headquarters, 34th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 69 (July 27, 1944)
Home of record: Honolulu, Hawaii

GABERLEIN, RAYMOND W.
SSG, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: December 26 & 27, 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Raymond W. Gaberlein (ASN: 13097559), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 26 December 1944 in Belgium. On that date, learning that the lead scout of an attacking rifle company was wounded and that the tactical situation made it impossible for the company to advance to a position where aid men could administer to the injured men, Staff Sergeant Gaberlein crawled forward under heavy automatic and small arms fire to successfully reach and treat the wounded scout. On the following day Staff Sergeant Gaberlein repeatedly led litter bearers and personally supervised the evacuation of all casualties in spite of severe artillery fire. His bravery, tireless efforts, and loyal devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 25 (January 25, 1945)
Home of record: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

GAGE, HERBERT C.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Herbert C. Gage, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 81, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1945

GALLAGHER, BRIAN J.
Captain, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Brian J. Gallagher, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 39, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1943

GALLAGHER, MATTHEW T.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 7th Armored Division
Action Date: 16 September 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Corporal [then Technician Fifth Grade] Matthew T. Gallagher, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 7th Armored Division, in action in France, on 16 September 1944. Corporal Gallagher's gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:  General Order 61, Headquarters, 7th Armored Division, 10 October 1944
Home of Record:  New York

GALT, RAYMOND M.
Captain, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 10th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Captain Raymond M. Galt, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 15, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

GANNONE, LAWRENCE F.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 15th Engineer Combat Battalion, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Lawrence F. Gannone, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 15th Engineer 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 86, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1943

*GARHART, THOMAS M.
Private First Class, U.S Army
Medical Detachment, 11th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action: WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Private First Class Thomas M. Garhart, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 40, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1944

GARTLAND, ROGER J.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Roger J. Gartland, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 15th Engineer 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 7, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1945

GARY, GEORGE C.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 120th Infantry Regiment, 30th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  3 January 1945
Citation:
Under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943 and pursuant to authority contained in Memorandum Number 34, Headquarters Ninth United States Army, 8 September 1944, the Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class George C. Gary, Medical Department, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 3 January 1945, in Belgium.  When one of his comrades had been wounded and was lying in an exposed position close to enemy lines, Private Gary voluntarily risked his life to run thirty-five yards to the wounded man.  Despite the heavy fire and though seriously wounded himself during this mission, Private Gary succeeded in administering first aid to his comrade.
General Orders:  General Order number 40, Headquarters, 30th Infantry Division, 28 February 1945
Home of Record:  Ohio

GAVITT, BURTON S.
Technician Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 104th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 28 Nov 1944
Synopsis:
Technician Fourth Class Burton S. Gavitt, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 104th Infantry Division during World War II.  The citation is said to include the following: Technician Fourth Class Burton S. Gavitt, Medical Detachment, as an aid man gave aid to the wounded under intense shell fire and, although twice wounded himself, continued his ministrations with utter disregard for his own personal safety.  After eleven hours of ceaseless labor he dropped, exhausted.
General Orders: General Order no 19, Nov 1944, Headquarters, 104th Infantry Division

GAYDA, MIKE
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division
Date of Action: August 1943
Synopsis: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Mike Gayda , United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Medical Detachment, 15th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Infantry Division on Sicily in Aug 1943.
General Orders: History of the 3d Infantry Division in World War II (Donald G. Taggart - Editor)

GEAHRY, JACK
Technician Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: August 18, 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Class Jack Geahry (ASN: 33275175), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 18 August 1944 in France.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 29 (September 6, 1944)
Home of record: Pennsylvania

*GELICKE, EDWARD H.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Edward H. Gelicke, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 15th Engineer 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 75, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1943

*GETZ, BARNEY L.
PFC, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: September 7, 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Barney L. Getz (ASN: 33247261), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 7 September 1944 in France. Private First Class Getz, in company with two other enlisted men, volunteered to take an ambulance to the aid station of a front line infantry battalion from which it had been theretofore impossible to remove casualties due to observed enemy artillery fire. In the course of several hours he aided in carrying twelve litter cases from the aid station to a place of safety while under fire the entire period. In removing the last two casualties from this station he was killed by enemy artillery fire. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 66 (October 30, 1944)
Home of record: Blair County, Pennsylvania

GIFFORD, ALLEN G.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 31st Infantry Division
Date of Action: 1945
Synopsis: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Allen G. Gifford, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 31st Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders: General Order number 67, Headquarters, 31st Infantry Division, 1945
Home of Record:  Schaghticoke, New York

GNOWLES, WALTER J.
First Lieutenant, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 317th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: November 28 - 30, 1944
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Medical Corps) Walter J. Gnowles (ASN: 0-2048928), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 317th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States from 28 to 30 November 1944 in France. In Farbersviller, France, during the period 28 to 30 November 1944, Lieutenant Gnowles set up and operated a temporary aid station under extremely hazardous conditions. After two days of constant evacuation and treatment of casualties, he remained behind when the battalion changed positions and continued his task although in enemy held territory. Not satisfied that all casualties had been evacuated he made a thorough search during daylight hours in enemy territory on 30 November 1944, finding three more wounded whom he evacuated to safety. The determination, courage, and devotion to duty displayed by Lieutenant Gnowles were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 116 (May 1, 1945)
Home of record: Michigan

GOFF, VERNON L.
Corporal, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 10th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Corporal Vernon L. Goff, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 70, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

*GOLDFARB, ALBERT D.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 318th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: March 31, 1945
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Technician Fifth Grade Albert D. Goldfarb (ASN: 13179360), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 318th Infantry Regiment, 80th Infantry Division, in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 31 March 1945 in Germany. On that date, Technician Fifth Grade Goldfarb, an Aid Man, was attached to a rifle company which assaulted enemy positions near Nieder Mellrich, Germany. Throughout the attack he efficiently rendered aid to the wounded despite the intense fire covering the area. During the battle a wounded man fell in an exposed position on a barren knoll. Although warned against doing so, Technician Fifth Grade Goldfarb, with little thought for his own safety, ran to the wounded man and began to give aid when he was mortally wounded. The courage and supreme devotion to duty displayed by Technician Fifth Grade Goldfarb were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 133 (May 22, 1945)
Home of record: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

GOLDMAN, LEONARD W.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 242d Infantry Regiment, 42d Infantry Division
Action Date: 25-Jan-45
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Leonard W. Goldman (ASN: 37311185), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 242d Infantry Regiment, 42d Infantry Division. On 25 January 1945, near Haguenau, France, Technician Fifth Grade Goldman was acting as aid man for his platoon whose position was overrun by the enemy. When it became imperative that his platoon withdraw, Technician Fifth Grade Goldman voluntarily remained with the wounded members of his platoon who could not be evacuated. Through his ability to speak German, he made arrangements with the enemy to care for the wounded if they would leave our wounded, as a result of which Technician Fifth Grade Goldman was captured and three of our enlisted men were left by the enemy and permitted to return to their own organization.
General Orders: Headquarters, 42d Infantry Division, General Orders No. 6 (1945)
Home of record: Minneapolis, Minnesota

GOLDSMITH, POE T.L.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Poe T.L. Goldsmith, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 36, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1944

*GONSALVES, JOSEPH
Private, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Private Joseph Gonsalves, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 89, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1944

GOULD, LEWIS W.
Technician Third Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 2nd Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Technician Third Grade Lewis W. Gould, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 38, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1944

GOURLEY, HOWARD T.
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Howard T. Gourley, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 12, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1945

GRAHAM, ANDREW I.
Technician Fourth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 9th Medical Battalion, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fourth Grade Andrew I. Graham, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 9th Medical Battalion, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 67, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1943

GREEN, VIRGIL C.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 11th Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Private First Class Virgil C. Green, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 81, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

GREENBERG, IRVING S.
Technician Fourth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fourth Grade Irving S. Greenberg, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 94, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1945

*GREENFIELD, CALMEN
Technician Fourth Grade, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fourth Grade Calmen Greenfield, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 54, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1943

GREGAN, DORSEY J. G.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
5th Medical Battalion, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Private First Class Dorsey J. G. Gregan, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 60, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

GRIMME, KENNETH M.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 2nd Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Private First Class Kenneth M. Grimme, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 44, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

*GROVE, CHARLES G.
Private, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division
Action Date: March 15, 1945
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private Charles G. Grove (ASN: 35619731), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 80th Infantry Division in connection with military operations against an enemy of the United States on 15 March 1945 in Germany. On that date, in an attack against the enemy near Greimerath, Germany, Private Grove, with utter disregard for his own safety, advanced to an exposed position and removed a wounded infantryman. On his way to the aid station he saw another wounded man. As he was administering first aid another enemy mortar barrage fell on his vehicle, wounding him in the head. Rather than risk the lives of the two wounded men he refused first aid from his assistant and ordered him to drive out of the woods. He crawled to a tree and s he was trying to bandage his wound he lost consciousness. Private Grove's intrepid courage and extreme devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 80th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 108 (April 22, 1945)
Home of record: Columbus, Ohio

GUARNERE, HENRY
Technician Fifth Grade, U.S. Army
47th Armored Medical Battalion, 1st Armored Division
Action Date: 1943
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Technician Fifth Grade Henry Guarnere (ASN: 33026746), United States Army, for gallantry in action on ****** 1943 in the vicinity of *****, Tunisia while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 47th Armored Medical Battalion, 1st Armored Division. During heavy counter battery fire a soldier in a gun section was seriously wounded and unable to reach shelter. Technician Fifth Grade Guarnere voluntarily and without hesitation ran to the wounded soldier and began administering first aid to him. Although the position was still receiving heavy fire he completely disregarded his own welfare by remaining with the wounded soldier and began administering first aid treatment. His daring and heroic actions undoubtedly saved the soldier's life. The gallantry, perseverance, and concern for the welfare of a wounded comrade displayed by Technician Fifth Grade Guarnere reflect great credit upon himself and the command and are highly commendable.
General Orders: General Order 44, Headquarters, 1st Armored Division, 7  May 1943
Home of Record: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

GUERRERO, RAFAEL M.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 2nd Infantry, 5th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  WW II
Unconfirmed, Citation Needed:
Private First Class Rafael M. Guerrero, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 5th Infantry Division during World War II.
General Orders:  General Order No 38, Headquarters, 5th Infantry Division, 1945

*GURKA, JOSEPH S.
Private, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: World War II
Unconfirmed: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Private Joseph S. Gurka, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the Medical Detachment, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division during World War II. 
General Orders: General Order number 56, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 1944

GUSMAN, WILLIAM L.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 30th Infantry Division
Date of Action:  16 November 1944
Citation:
Under the provisions of AR 600-45, 22 September 1943 and pursuant to authority contained in Memorandum Number 34, Headquarters Ninth United States Army, 8 September 1944, the Silver Star is awarded to Private First Class William L. Gusman, Medical Department, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 16 November 1944, in Germany.  Private Gusman, a medical aid man, was attached to an infantry company making an attack through a mine field on an enemy position.  In the course of the fighting, numerous casualties were inflicted upon his comrades.  Displaying great fortitude and courage, Private Gusman rendered first aid to many wounded soldiers during the engagement, and risked his life many times in moving fearlessly about the battlefield.  When all the wounded had received treatment, he assisted three casualties, who could walk, through a mine field under enemy machine gun fire to a protected cellar in the rear, after which he led a litter bearer team back to the front and directed the evacuation of the more seriously wounded.
General Orders:  General Order number 129, Headquarters, 30th Infantry Division, 20 December 1944
Home of Record:  Ohio

GUTOW, JULIUS J.
First Lieutenant
2d Field Hospital
Action Date: 7-Dec-42
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant (Medical Corps) Julius J. Gutow, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving as a Medical Officer assigned to the 2d Field Hospital at Sememi, New Guinea, on 7 December 1942. Lieutenant Gutow cared for the sick and wounded, working courageously and fearlessly, entirely oblivious of his personal safety, while continually being bombed and strafed by enemy planes. First Lieutenant Gutow's gallant actions and dedicated devotion to his fellow man, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: The Military Surgeon, March 1943
Home of record: Detroit, Michigan

GUTTIEREZ, EDWARD A.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 104th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 22 November 1944
Synopsis:
Private First Class Edward A. Guttierez, United States Army, is reported to have been awarded the Silver Star under the below-listed General Orders for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving with the 104th Infantry Division during World War II.  The citation is said to include the following:  On 22 November 1944 Private Guttierez made two trips through a ravine which was under a relentless hail of enemy fire to rescue two seriously wounded comrades, working tirelessly for three hours to save the lives of the two men.  Again, on 10 December 1944, Private Guttierez left his covered position to cross coverless terrain in the face of heavy fire to administer first aid to a comrade.  Ascertaining that the wounded man could not be moved without a litter, and fully realizing that the company was to make a withdrawal, he remained with the wounded man, despite the withering fire for over ten hours until the objective was captured.
General Orders: General Orders no 162, 1944, Headquarters, 104th Infantry Division