U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

Vietnam War, Page 2, L-Z

AMEDD Silver Star

Interesting Notes:

In addition to the Silver Star, Specialist Joseph LaPointe Jr also received the Medal of Honor for his actions in Vietnam. Read his Medal of Honor citation

Chief Warrant Officer Stephen R. Purchase also recieived the Distinguished Service Cross for his actions in Vietnam. Read his DSC citation.

Specialist Five Leslie S Lincoln is a double recipient of the Silver Star.

Specialist Five James G. Perlmutter also earned the Bronze Star with "V" device and the Soldier's Medal

CPT James Ralph, Flight Surgeon, left the helicopter ambulance to treat, sort and carry casualties from the battlefield throughout the day and well into the night until not one known Soldier remained on the field of battle. Captain Ralph also earned the Bronze Star with "V" device while in Vietnam.

In addition to the Silver Star, Specialist Fifth Class Mark Rost Tietjen also received the Bronze Star with “V” device

Specialist Fourth Class Ernest Echavarria Serrano earned the Silver Star an incredible, three times in Vietnam.

Private First Class Erwin Bruce Sims was a conscientious objector

Sergeant Patrick St Clair earned his Silver Star as part of the all volunteer Son Tay raiding force to rescue prisoners of war

Warrant Officer 1 Oscar Wynne III earned his Silver Star as a pilot of an Air Ambulance Helicopter during a daring rescue of badly wounded Soldiers.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

Page 1, A-K

*LA POINTE, JOSEPH G. JR.,
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S Army
Troop B, 2nd Squadron, 17th Cavalry, 101st Airborne Division
Date action: 12 April 1969
Posthumously
Citation:
For gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 12 April 1969. Specialist La Pointe distinguished himself while serving as a medical aidman on a combat operation in the A Shau Valley, Republic of Vietnam. As Specialist La Pointe's platoon was moving up a hill to set up a night defensive position, the third squad fell behind because of several heat casualties, but before he reached their position, an artillery round impacted near the position of the main body of the platoon. Realizing that there were probably casualties due to the artillery, he rushed to the aid of his fallen comrades. While moving up the hill, three more rounds impacted between him and the platoon. Never pausing to take cover, he ran headlong through the bursting artillery to the aid of the wounded. He treated seventeen casualties, several of which were severe. He was directly instrumental in saving the life of one man and his quick thinking and expert treatment prevented the possible loss of more lives. Specialist La Pointe's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States army.
General Orders: Department of the Army Headquarters 101st Airborne Division APO San Francisco 96383 Number 9229 21 July 1969

*LARSON, JOHN G.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 17 December 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class John Gilbert Larson (ASN: RA-19843852), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Private First Class Larson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 17 December 1966, while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during an air assault operation in the Republic of Vietnam. Moments after being air assaulted into an area of suspected enemy activity, Private First Class Larson's company came under heavy fire from well entrenched enemy positions concealed in hedgerows less than forty meters ahead and sustained several casualties. Several key men, including the company commander, a platoon leader and one of the platoon Medical Aidmen, were wounded in the fierce point-blank fire fight. Private First Class Larson immediately rushed forward through the withering fire and began treating the more seriously wounded men in his platoon. Despite pleas by his platoon sergeant to wait until the firing subsided, Private First Class Larson made numerous trips forward to treat and help evacuate the wounded. After he had treated the more seriously wounded in his own platoon, Private First Class Larson moved to the platoon where the Aidman had been wounded, and began treating the casualties in that unit. As the wounded continued to mount, Private First Class Larson moved back and forth between the two units, repeatedly exposing himself to enemy fire. When a close friend was felled by the hostile fire, Private First Class Larson raced forward still another time and shielded the man with his own body while working feverishly to revive him. Private First Class Larson was critically wounded while attempting to save his friend's life. Private First Class Larson's courageous action stands in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 587 (February 7, 1967)

LEROY, MICHAEL L.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 31 May 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918, and USARV Message 16695, dated 1 July 1966 the Silver Star is presented to Specialist Fourth Class Michael L. Leroy for gallantry in action. Specialist Four Leroy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 31 May 1967, while serving as a medical aidman attached to Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry during combat operations near the village of An Qui, Republic of Vietnam. When his company came into contact with a numerically superior, well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army force, one platoon immediately became pinned down and the others were engaged in an intense fire fight. During the initial volley of fire, several men were hist by the intense fire. Braving the hostile bullets, Specialist Leroy moved to all the wounded men, treated their wounds and personally supervised their medical evacuation. While moving from man to man, he individually assaulted several enemy bunkers, killing the North Vietnamese gunners and capturing their weapons. Later, when he spotted a fallen comrade ahead of the rest of his platoon, Specialist Leroy braved the enemy automatic weapons fire to get to the man and move him to a position affording cover. When a squad leader was wounded directly in front of an enemy fortification, Specialist Leroy, with only one rifleman to cover his movement, moved to within five meters of the enemy position and rescued the fallen leader. While treating the man and carrying him to safety, Specialist Leroy was the prime target of the enemy gunners, however, he ignored the bullets striking all around him and continued his mission. Although the squad leader was twice more wounded before he could be brought to safety, his life was saved by Specialist Leroy’s courageous efforts. Specialist Leroy’s gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order No. 5041, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 3 September 1967.

LIERD, ROBERT M.
SSG, U.S. Army
3d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division
Date of Action: 29 February 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant Robert M. Lierd (ASN: RA-19688976), United States Army, for gallantry in action on 29 February 1968, while serving as Medical Advisor, 3d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, Army of the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, the Battalion was on a search and destroy operation in Sadec Province, Republic of Vietnam, when it came under automatic weapons and small arms fire from an estimated Viet Cong company. During the six-hour battle, Sergeant Lierd repeatedly exposed himself to hostile fire while treating and protecting wounded Vietnamese soldiers. On one occasion, Sergeant Lierd fired an automatic weapon to support an attack on the enemy forces and his volume of fire was directly responsible for the friendly unit being able to move. When informed that a wounded Vietnamese soldier was lying to the front in an exposed position, Sergeant Lierd unhesitatingly crawled forward and moved the man to safety. He then moved about the area searching for other wounded soldiers. He protected the wounded soldiers by throwing hand grenades on the enemy positions. Staff Sergeant Lierd's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: U.S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2774 (August 26, 1968)

LINCOLN, LESLIE S. (First Award)
Specialist Five, U.S. Army
Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 21 January 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Five Leslie S. Lincoln, United States Army. Specialist Five Lincoln distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 21 January 1970 while serving as a medic with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while on operations in dense jungle near the Cambodian border, the troop came under intense mortar, rocket propelled grenade and automatic weapons fire from a battalion of North Vietnamese soldiers. When a tank was hit by a rocket propelled grenade, Specialist Lincoln dismounted his vehicle and went to the aid of the wounded tank commander, despite being exposed to the hostile fire. Two other vehicles were disabled and began receiving fire from the advancing enemy. He immediately aided members of both tanks and insured their evacuation upon the medic tank.  Specialist Five Lincoln’s actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1454, Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, 8 April 1970.

LINCOLN, LESLIE S. (Second Award)
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 14 February 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Five Leslie S. Lincoln, United States Army. Specialist Four Lincoln distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against a hostile force on 14 February 1970 while serving as a combat medic with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date Specialist Lincoln’s unit came under heavy enemy mortar, rocket-propelled grenades and automatic weapons fire from an estimated battalion sized North Vietnamese Army force. In the initial moments of contact, several friendly casualties were sustained and lying in exposed positions. Without hesitation, Specialist Lincoln exposed himself to the heavy fire by shielding the wounded with his own body while administering aid. He then carried the men to the medic vehicle one by one, until they were evacuated. Later in the battle, several more casualties were sustained when a tank was disabled by enemy fire. Again, Specialist Lincoln risked his life when he made several trips through the bullet riddled area to carry the wounded to his medic vehicle. Throughout the firefight, Specialist Lincoln continually exposed himself to heavy enemy fire to administer aid to wounded soldiers, one guiding a tank into an area to destroy an enemy bunker. Specialist Four Lincoln’s actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders number 1916, Headquarters, II Field Force, Vietnam, 17 May 1970

LINDSAY, ROBERT D. JR.
Specialist Five, U.S. Army
Unknown
Date of Action: 10 December 1967
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant (then Specialist Five) Robert D. Lindsay Jr., United States Army. Specialist Four Lincoln distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against a hostile force on 10 December 1967 while serving as a combat medic in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Lindsay distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions in the early morning hours of 10 December 1967, while serving as a medical aidman at the base camp at An Nhut Tan, Vietnam. An estimated battalion of Viet Cong launched a mortar and rocket attack on the camp, followed by a ground assault of the perimeter. While caring for wounded at the aid station, Specialist Lindsay received an urgent call for medical help from the mortar pits. Knowing that the area was only partially under American control, and with complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Lindsay ran from bunker to bunker to treat the injured. Despite a number of mortar shrapnel wounds, he continued to treat the men until the attack was repulsed, at which time he moved serious casualties to a medical evacuation site and worked for several hours with those whose wounds were minor. Specialist Lindsay’s extraordinary heroism in close combat with the enemy is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order unknown. Awarded at Letterman Hospital by MG Charles H. Gingles, MC

LITTLE, LOREN E.
Major, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Medical Detachment, 173d Airborne Brigade
Date of Action: 9 January 1970
Synopsis: Citation needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major Loren E. Little, Medical Corps), United States Army for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations in the Republic of Vietnam while serving as a Medical Officer with the 173d Airborne Brigade on 9 January 1970. His actions, without regard for his own safety, reflect great credit on himself and the Armed Forces of the United States. (This award supersedes award of the Bronze Star Medal with “V” device to Major Little for heroism on 9 January 1970 as announced in General Orders number 112, Headquarters, 173d Airborne Brigade, APO San Francisco 96250, dated 14 January 1970)
General Orders: General Order number 44, Department of the Army, 6 December 1973

MARTINSON, GLEN R.
Sergeant, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate)
Date of Action: 27 September 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Glen R. Martinson (ASN: RA-17720774), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Sergeant Martinson distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 27 September 1968, while serving as Senior Medic of Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne, 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). On this day, Company C encountered heavy automatic weapons fire from a battalion-sized North Vietnamese Army base camp near Landing Zone UPLIFT, Republic of Vietnam. During the engagement, Sergeant Martinson continually moved about, exposing himself to the intense enemy fire, treating the wounded and advising his Aidmen on treatment of the more seriously wounded. Seeing a man lying wounded that could not be reached because of the exchange of fire, he rushed forward in an attempt to reach the man. As he moved, he was hit in the chest by an enemy bullet. Due to the seriousness of his wound, he had to be pulled back and given aid. When the wounded were consolidated, Sergeant Martinson continued to aid and direct his Aidmen in treating the wounded, though he was one of the most seriously wounded. His complete disregard for his own safety and great determination in treating his fellow soldiers was an inspiration to all who witnessed his acts. Sergeant Martinson's conspicuous gallantry in close combat against a numerically superior North Vietnamese Army force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

MAYWETHER, BILLY R.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 23 May 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Four Billy R. Maywether. Specialist Four Maywether distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 23 May 1969 while serving as a medic with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while conducting a reconnaissance operation, the troop made contact with an enemy company using small arms, heavy machine guns and rocket-propelled grenades. In the initial contact one of the troop’s assault vehicles received a direct rocket-propelled grenade hit, wounding two of the crew members and causing the vehicle to burst into flames. Unhesitatingly, Specialist Maywether ran through the hostile fusillade to the burning vehicle. After extracting the casualties from the flames, he administered immediate aid and then carried them to an evacuation point. Later when two more men were wounded by an exploding grenade, Specialist Maywether administered aid to them. A short time later a vehicle commander was wounded by heavy machine gun fire. Disregarding his own safety, Specialist Maywether ran through the hostile fire to the casualty and treated him so effectively that he could resume command of his vehicle. When another vehicle received a direct hit, wounding the entire crew, Specialist Maywether, again ignoring the enemy fusillade, ran to the endangered vehicle, gave the wounded medical assistance and helped them to the evacuation point. Specialist Four Maywether’s outstanding courage, perseverance and concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order 2670, Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, 6 October 1969

MCCALVY, JOSEPH A. III
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters, 7th Squadron, 17th Air Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade
Date of Action: 15 – 16 January 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Joseph A. McCalvy, III (ASN: RA-18961867), United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Headquarters, 7th Squadron, 17th Air Cavalry, 1st Aviation Brigade in the Republic of Vietnam on 15 - 16 January 1969. Specialist McCalvy distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as a Medic with an Aero-Rifle Platoon, which was inserted into an area fifteen miles north of Plei Djereng, to recover two bodies from an AH-1G gunship. While moving toward an extraction zone, the five man point element was ambushed by a reinforced enemy company in bunker positions. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Specialist McCalvy charged into the intense enemy fire three times in order to assist the wounded men to the rear where he professionally administered first aid to their wounds. The platoon was surrounded and was under heavy automatic weapons fire for over thirty hours. Of his own volition he consistently exposed himself in order to help the steadily mounting number of wounded and to assist his platoon leader in communicating with his perimeter elements. An all-out attack launched by the enemy, reduced the ammunition supply of the friendly force to two slips per man. When it was possible to complete a successful evacuation Specialist McCalvy established the priorities of the wounded and assisted them to the helicopter. It was only after the whole friendly force was extracted that he mentioned that he had been wounded himself for some time. His calmness and proficiency, as well as his never ceasing bravery, were a constant source of inspiration for his comrades in arms. His actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1582, Headquarters, 1st Aviation Brigade, 9 April 1969

MCDADE, TYRONE
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company E, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 4 April 1968
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Tyrone McDade for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Company E, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division in the Republic of Vietnam. PFC McDade distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 April 1968 while on a reconnaissance in force mission in Kien Hoa Province, Vietnam. When his armored troop carrier beached to assault an enemy ambush position, it came under intense .50 caliber machine gun and B40 rochet fire. PFC McDade fearlessly exposed himself to the devastating barrage to treat the many wounded within the craft itself and on the exposed canal bank. The overwhelmingly superior Viet Cong force was beginning to overrun their position, so the platoon leader ordered the remainder of the platoon to maneuver to defensive position away from the landing craft. Although wounded himself by .50 caliber machine gun fire, PFC McDade courageously chose to remain on the beach and feign death in the hope of later assisting casualties after the enemy had withdrawn. Only after PFC McDade had treated the wounded and counted the dead did he crawl to the water’s edge and swim to a friendly position. PFC McDade’s extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
General Orders: General Order number unknown, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, date unknown. Presented by General William Westmoreland at Letterman General Hospital 10 August 1968.

MCDONNELL, DENNIS MICHAEL
PFC, U.S. Army
3d Field Hospital, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 31 January 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Dennis Michael McDonnell, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with the 3d Field Hospital, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade, in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class McDonnell distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as a Medical Aidman in support of the United States Army Headquarters Area Command reaction force. When a truck transporting military policemen was ambushed in an alley in the Gia Dinh sector of Saigon, the reaction force immediately rushed to assist the severely wounded survivors. Snipers all around the tiny street where the vehicle had been attacked unleashed continuous volleys of automatic rifle and grenade fire making an approach to the scene extremely perilous. Time and time again the reaction force was driven back by the strafing fusillade. Ultimately two officers prepared to attempt the rescue, and Private McDonnell, although completely unarmed, volunteered to accompany them. As soon as the three reached the stalled vehicle, the scattered Viet Cong snipers opened fire. Private McDonnell had immediately begun administering medical aid to the wounded lying around the truck when a grenade exploded nearby, wounding him and throwing him to the ground. He managed to crawl under the truck as the two officers fought their way out of the alley. For more than five hours, Private McDonnell lay trapped under the vehicle, yet he did what he could to treat those whom he could reach. Finally the officers succeeded in leading the reaction force into the alley, driving the snipers away and evacuating the casualties including the wounded Medic. Private First Class McDonnell's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 270 (January 31, 1970
Home of Record: Los Angeles, California

*MCKELLAR, DENNIS ALVIN
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment,
Date of Action: unknown
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Dennis Alvin McKellar, United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class McKellar distinguished himself while serving as Platoon Medic for the 3d Platoon, Company A, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, which was conducting a search and destroy mission in the mountainous and dense jungle near Plei Djerang. The company encountered a well-fortified North Vietnamese force and the Third Platoon maneuvered to eliminate a bunker complex which housed enemy automatic weapons. With great determination and courage, the platoon aggressively assaulted the enemy and destroyed the position; however, a well-placed and concealed enemy sniper began to pick off the gallant friendly troops. A soldier received a gunshot wound in the hip and called for a medic. Private First Class McKellar immediately and unhesitatingly went to his comrade's aid. While attending the soldier's wound, the sniper again opened fire and hit Private First Class McKellar in the base of the spine. Although critically wounded and completely incapacitated, Private First Class McKellar initially refused assistance from another soldier who came to his aid. Instead, he gave verbal instructions to the new helper so that his patient's wound might be properly cared for. Private First Class McKellar and his wounded comrades were evacuated; however, the valiant medic died of his wounds shortly after he was admitted to the hospital. By unhesitatingly placing the life of his fellow man above his own, Private First Class McKellar demonstrated courage, determination, and devotion to duty of the highest order. His heroic actions are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order unknown at this time.

MORRIS, GEOFFREY D.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
237th Medical Detachment, 61st Medical Battalion, 67th Medical Group
Date of Action: 1 June 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Geoffrey D. Morris, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with the 237th Medical Detachment, 61st Medical Battalion, 67th Medical Group in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Morris distinguished himself on 1 June 1970 while serving as Medical Aidman aboard a helicopter ambulance during a rescue operation in a fire-swept area near Hue. As Private Morris and his companions attempted to land to evacuate several wounded allied soldiers from the scene of heavy fighting with enemy troops, their helicopter was severely damaged by hostile fire and forced to make an emergency landing in the contact area. Realizing that an explosion and fire were highly probable, the crew immediately departed the helicopter amid the hail of enemy fire. Moments later Private Morris discovered that the crew chief was still aboard the damaged ship and immediately returned to aid his companion. Although intense enemy fire-swept the area surrounding the wreckage, he ran to the helicopter and removed his injured comrade seconds before the aircraft burst into flames. After administering first aid to all injured crew members, Private Morris again exposed himself to the intense enemy fire as he searched the adjacent area for wounded allied ground combat troops. After treating several casualties, he insured that all the injured were safely loaded aboard a second evacuation helicopter that arrived on the scene a short while later. Private First Class Morris' gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order No 5032, Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, November 9, 1970

NOEL, THOMAS E.
PFC, U.S. Army
Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division
Date of Action: 21 March 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Thomas E. Noel (ASN: US-56438202), United States Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 21 March 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Noel distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as a Medical Aidman with the Reconnaissance Platoon of Company E, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, his platoon was participating in a combined infantry-armor sweep into the hamlet of Ap Bon (1) when they came under intense automatic weapons and rocket fire from a North Vietnamese Army force of Company size. Without regard for his own safety, Private Noel repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire as he moved throughout the area administering aid to his wounded comrades and pointing out enemy positions. He aided four men before the unit was directed to withdraw and allow supporting artillery fire to be brought in upon the enemy locations. As they withdrew, Private Noel noticed a wounded soldier about 100 meters back. He unhesitatingly dashed across an open rice paddy amidst a withering hail of hostile fire to reach the man and carry him to safety. He then aided several more men in the same manner. Private First Class Noel's conspicuous gallantry and tenacious devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 2753 (May 25, 1968)

O’BRIEN, DONALD J.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
1st Platoon, Company B, 2nd Battalion, 1st Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 4-5 November 1966
Citation:
For gallantry in action: Private First Class O’Brien distinguished himself by heroic actions in the Republic of Vietnam. Private O’Brien was serving as a medic with the 1st Platoon, Company B, 2d Battalion, 1st Infantry, during the evening of 4 November and morning of 5 November 1966, when his platoon was subjected to heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire. Many casualties were inflicted by the enemy fire and Private O’Brien received a fragment wound in the right eye. Disregarding his own wound, Private O’Brien treated the other wounded and directed their evacuation. After administering aid to his own unit, Private O’Brien proceeded to aid an adjacent unit which had sustained heavy casualties. As he made his way under the heavy barrage of enemy fire, it appeared that he would be unable to reach the adjacent unit, but his monumental perseverance and devotion to duty meant more to him than his own safety. Upon reaching the stranded unit he administered aid to their wounded. Throughout the night, Private O’Brien made several trips back and forth between the units to treat other wounded personnel and direct their evacuation. Private O’Brien’s conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order 104, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, 9 January 1967

OLLER, STEVEN W.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 4th Medical Battalion, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 11 May 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Steven W. Oller, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Oller distinguished himself while serving as a Senior Medical Specialist with Company D, 4th Medical Battalion, 4th Infantry Division. On 11 May 1969, Landing Zone Oasis came under heavy rocket, mortar, and ground attack by a large North Vietnamese sapper unit. Specialist Oller, with complete disregard for his personal safety, exposed himself to the intense hostile fire to treat the wounded. Moving from bunker to bunker he treated the casualties and carried several of them across a large open area to safety. His actions were directly responsible for the saving of many lives. Specialist Fifth Class Oller's personal bravery, determination and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 3104 (June 16, 1969)
Home of Record: Crescent City, California

*PACHECO, JAIME
SP4, U.S. Army
Company H, 75th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade (Separate), 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 25 May 1972
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Jaime Pacheco, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Four Pacheco distinguished himself on 25 May 1972 while serving as medic on a Ranger Team which was on a reconnaissance mission in Tan Uyen Province, Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Pacheco walked as rear scout for a four man point reconnaissance element when the element discovered an enemy bunker complex. As the first three men of the element exhausted their first magazines, Specialist Pacheco immediately recognized the danger caused by the lull in firing and rushed the bunkers firing his own weapon and throwing fragmentation grenades. As the team withdrew from the bunker complex, he remained in his position and continued to throw a total of twelve fragmentation grenades, covering the team's withdrawal. By holding the enemy at bay his fellow soldiers were able to escape without injury. When he attempted to rejoin his team, he was hit by enemy fire which wounded him fatally. His actions gave the team the precious time they needed to reach safety. Specialist Pacheco's gallantry in action and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 1923
Home of Record: Hobbs, New Mexico

*PAIGE, ROBERT E.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 2nd Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 18 March 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Robert E. Paige, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military conflict involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Private First Class Paige distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 18 March 1967, while serving as a medic on a combat operation in the jungles of Vietnam. As the unit moved across a clearing in dense jungle, it suddenly came under fierce attack from a numerically superior Viet Cong force armed with Claymore mines, small arms, and automatic weapons. Seeing a number of his comrades fall in the initial burst of enemy fire, Private Paige immediately dashed across the bullet swept battlefield in order to render medical Aid to the wounded. Without regard for personal safety and fully realizing the peril of the situation, Private Paige exposed himself to a torrent of enemy fire as he moved to the injured soldiers and aided in evacuating them to an area of comparative safety. In an attempt to reach one of the wounded men, Private Paige was hit by a burst of insurgent fire and was mortally wounded. Private Paige’s professional aid and personal sacrifice was an inspiration to all and contributed significantly to saving the lives of many. Private First Class Paige’s extraordinary heroism while in close combat with a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order No. 3895, Headquarters 9th Infantry Division, 7 August 1967.
Home of Record: Fayette, Missouri

PERLMUTTER, JAMES G.
Specialist Five, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion (Mechanized) 2d Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Date of Action: 18 February 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), and USARV Message 16695, dated 1 July 1966, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Five James G. Perlmutter, United States Army. For gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: On this date, Specialist Perlmutter was serving as the senior medical aidman with a mechanized infantry platoon on a mission to secure a convoy moving on Highway 13 between Di An and Ben Cat. As the convoy was nearing the abandoned village of Cau Dinh, it was suddenly subjected to intensive automatic weapons, machinegun, and rocket fire from a reinforced North Vietnamese heavy weapons company which was entrenched in the village. Several casualties were sustained by the friendly forces during the initial enemy contact. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Specialist Perlmutter exposed himself to the hostile fire as he moved from one casualty to another, treating the men and supervising their evacuation. For the first five hours of the battle, he supervised the transportation of the casualties to the landing zone. When reinforcements arrived, the friendly forces assaulted the enemy’s fortified positions and two armored personnel carriers became disabled by hostile fire. Specialist Perlmutter moved his vehicle through the hail of hostile rounds to the two inoperative vehicles, and then carried several wounded personnel to a relatively protected position. While treating the wounded, he frequently fired at the insurgents in order to protect the casualties. Specialist Perlmutter moved to within 50 meters of the hostile positions and accounted for several of the 84 enemy killed during the encounter. His courageous perseverance, professional skill, and selfless determination to aid his comrades were responsible for saving several American lives. Specialist Five Perlmutter’s unquestionable valor while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an insurgent force is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 7069, Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, 20 July 1968

PEYTON, JOEL C.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry
Date of Action: 11 June 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Joel C. Peyton (ASN: US-51947865), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action. Specialist Fourth Class Peyton distinguished himself by heroic actions on 11 June 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. While established in a night defensive position, elements of the 27th Infantry came under an intense enemy mortar attack, which was followed by a massive ground assault. As the battle ensued, several casualties were sustained. With complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Peyton moved through the bullet swept area to one of the wounded men's positions. Upon reaching the injured man, Specialist Peyton treated the man and evacuated the man to a safe location. When other mortars impacted within the perimeter, Specialist Peyton again exposed himself to the holocaust of exploding projectiles as he maneuvered to the injured men's positions and administered first aid to his fallen comrades. Throughout the battle, Specialist Peyton constantly exposed himself to the hostile fire in order to treat the wounded men. His valorous actions were responsible for saving several lives. Specialist Peyton's bravery and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 10698 (August 22, 1969)
Home of Record: Hustonville, Kentucky

PURCHASE, STEPHEN R.
Chief Warrant Officer (WO 1), U.S. Army
159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance)
Date of Action: December 27, 1971
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Warrant Officer One (WO-1) Stephen R. Purchase, United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance). Warrant Officer Purchase distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 December 1971 while serving as the Pilot of an aeromedical evacuation helicopter on a mission to evacuate the crew of a downed United States Army helicopter. An insertion of the Republic of Vietnam Forces took place in the area of XT 4020. The helicopter provided for the insertion of these troops were ships of the 128th Assault Helicopter company with American pilots. After the insertion of the ARVN troops, heavy casualties were sustained and a request was made by the ARVN ground commander for a medical evacuation helicopter. An American lift helicopter made an approach to the landing zone to attempt a pickup of wounded ARVN's, but had to turn back due to the intensity of enemy fire. At this time a rocket hit the aircraft and caused the ship to crash and burn. The crew managed to escape. Dust Off 107 piloted by Mr. Purchase, entered the landing zone and remained on the ground amidst intense enemy fire and not until all of the Americans and ten of the Vietnamese soldiers had been loaded did they depart. Warrant Officer Purchase's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1226 (June 6, 1972)
Home of Record: Fairbanks, Alaska

PURTELL, JAMES FRANCIS
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division
Date of Action: 9 May 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class James Francis Purtell, United States Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Purtell distinguished himself on 9 May 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, Company C was on a search and clear mission in Tam Ky district when they came under heavy automatic weapons and small arms fire from a company-sized element of North Vietnamese Army Regulars. During this initial burst of fire, a platoon sergeant was mortally wounded, and the company was forced to withdraw without retrieving his body. Private Purtell was a member of a five-man patrol which attempted to return under the heavy fire to reach the sergeant's body. After moving only 40 meters the patrol was raked by withering fire and three members were wounded. Private Purtell treated the wounded men while still under this heavy fire, and dragged all three men over 200 meters to medical evacuation helicopters. The intense heat had caused twelve men to faint from heat exhaustion, and Private Purtell treated these men and carried them to the helicopters. His heroic actions had exhausted him also, but he refused to be evacuated, and continued to treat other wounded personnel. Only when he was physically unable to perform his duties did Private Purtell consent to seek medical aid. Private First Class Purtell's heroic actions and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order No. 6121, Headquarters, Americal Division, August 20, 1968

RALPH, JAMES W.
CPT, U.S. Army
Medical Corps
Date of Action: 21 June 1964
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Medical Corps) James W. Ralph, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 21 June 1964, in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, friendly forces were engaged in one of the most vicious battles of the year when the helicopter ambulance in which Captain Ralph was Flight Surgeon arrived to evacuate the wounded. Because of the immediate proximity of the enemy and the intensity of the fighting, the aeromedical evacuation staff was unable to treat and sort the casualties and establish a central, secure pickup point. Captain Ralph left the aircraft and went unarmed into the midst of the fighting in search of casualties. He treated, sorted, and carried the wounded from the corners of the battlefield back to the helicopter. Captain Ralph continued his exhausting work under intensive fire throughout the day and well into the night. Despite the fact that the helicopter ambulance was twice damaged by intensive ground fire, one pilot was wounded, and he himself was often the target of enemy fire, Captain Ralph continued to sort, treat, and carry casualties until not one known soldier remained on the battlefield. Captain Ralph's outstanding display of valor in these extreme conditions, while under intensive enemy fire, brought great credit on himself, the Army Medical Corps, and the United States Army, and is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 31 (July 1, 1971)

ROGER, RICHARD N.
CPT, U.S. Army
Medical Research Team, U.S. Army Headquarters Area Command
Date of Action: 30 January 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Medical Corps) Richard N. Roger (ASN: 0-5712698), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Roger distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 30 January 1968 as surgeon of a Special Forces mobile strike unit during the Lunar New Year battle for Pleiku. The unit was conducting a search and clear operation in the outskirts of the city and was pinned down by intense enemy fire, suffering numerous casualties. Captain Roger unhesitantly proceeded into the midst of the battle and began to render aid to the wounded. He crawled one hundred meters through savage automatic weapons fire to an American tank which had sustained a direct hit from an enemy anti-tank weapons. Heedless of exploding ammunition in the fiercely burning vehicle, he rescued a severely wounded crew member, administered professional medical treatment to him and directed the immediate evacuation of the other wounded tankers. Captain Roger was informed that the unit commander was seriously wounded and lying in an entirely exposed position. Braving a withering hail of bullets, he moved to the stricken officer, treated him and supervised his evacuation from the raging battlefield. He then continued his lifesaving mission until the last friendly casualty had been treated and safely evacuated. Captain Roger's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1359 (March 27, 1968)

*RUNION, MARION G.
Captain, Dental Corps, U.S. Army
Company B, 1st Med Battalion, 1st Infantry Division
Date of Action: 2 February 1967
Synopsis: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Captain Marion G. Runion, Dental Corps, United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Runion went forward with a dust-off ship when word was received of a casualty who was wounded in the neck and jaw and having trouble breathing. The ship was fired on as he was helping to guide it to the landing zone. Once on the ground Captain Runion proceeded to the casualty and carried him to the helicopter. As the ship took off it was hit my enemy fire and crashed, killing all aboard. Captain Runion’s conduct and actions reflect the highest traditions of the Army Medical Service.
General Orders: USARV Medical Bulletin, USARV PAM 40-3 May/June 1967

SCANLAN, WILLIAM H.
CPT, U.S. Army
Medical Service Corps
Date of Action: 29 August 1963
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Medical Service Corps) William H. Scanlan, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations in Vietnam on 29 August 1963. As Pilot of a UH-1B helicopter, Captain Scanlan voluntarily participated in a mission to transport troops and supplies to a ground Company of the Army of the Republic of Vietnam and to evacuate the wounded from an area under heavy enemy attack. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Captain Scanlan bravely approached the landing area while his heavily loaded aircraft was the target of intense hostile gun fire. As soon as he succeeded in landing the aircraft in the combat zone, the supplies, a new Company Commander, and personnel were unloaded from the helicopter, and the wounded were taken aboard. Upon takeoff, he continued to display his fortitude and professional skill, and flew the wounded out of the battlefield to a medical facility. His unselfish actions and courageous conduct while under flanking fire averted further losses to the friendly troops and enabled them to force the enemy to withdraw. Captain Scanlan's conspicuous gallantry is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 2 (February 5, 1965)

SERRANO, ERNEST ECHAVARRIA (First Award)
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment (Mechanized), 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 12 May 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Ernest Echavarria Serrano , United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 12 May 1969, while serving as a Medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment (Mechanized), 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date elements of the battalion made contact with a well-entrenched, numerically superior enemy force using small arms and automatic weapons. In the early moments of the engagement when a friendly soldier was seriously wounded, Specialist Serrano maneuvered fifty meters across open terrain to administer aid to the casualty. Specialist Serrano then helped move the man to an evacuation point. During two more assaults on the enemy positions, he volunteered to be with the forward elements so that he could give immediate aid to the wounded. By repeatedly exposing himself to the hostile fusillade, he was able to administer aid to a total of thirty-seven casualties during the fierce six-hour battle. As a result of his skillful and prompt treatment, only fourteen of these casualties had to be evacuated. Specialist Fourth Class Serrano's courage and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number, Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, 30 September 1969
Home of Record: Los Angeles, CA

SERRANO, ERNEST ECHAVARRIA (Second Award)
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment (Mechanized), 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 17 April 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Ernest Echavarria Serrano , United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 17 April 1969, while serving as a Medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment (Mechanized), 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date he was part of a reaction force called to re-supply and assist one of the brigade's companies during an engagement with an enemy force. When he arrived at the scene of the battle, all of the company's medics had been wounded, and several friendly casualties were left unattended and pinned down by the hostile fire. Specialist Serrano maneuvered across the open terrain from man to man and administered emergency aid. For over two hours he braved the enemy fusillade to treat the wounded and evacuate them to safety. Specialist Serrano's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number, Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, 28 December 1969
Home of Record: Los Angeles, CA

SERRANO, ERNEST ECHAVARRIA (Third Award)
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment (Mechanized), 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting a 2nd Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Third Award of the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Ernest Echavarria Serrano, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 1969, while serving as a Medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment (Mechanized), 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date during a reconnaissance operation in a booby trapped area near Binh Phoc, the platoon of which he was a member suddenly came under intense enemy fire and several men were wounded. Although wounded during the initial contact, Specialist Serrano began moving toward one of the casualties. Again Specialist Serrano was hit by enemy fire, but he finally reached his wounded comrade and administered emergency aid. Refusing to be evacuated for his own wounds, Specialist Serrano continued to assist the friendly casualties until all of them had been treated and evacuated. Specialist Fourth Class Serrano's actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number, Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, 28 December 1969
Home of Record: Los Angeles, CA

*SIMS, ERWIN BRUCE
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 50th Infantry
Date of Action: 2 March 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star posthumously to Private First Class Erwin Bruce Sims, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force In the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Sims distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 March 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion (Mechanized), 50th Infantry during a search and clear mission near Thuan Dao in the Republic of Vietnam. When his unit became heavily engaged with a large enemy force and sustained several casualties, Private First Class Sims, disregarding his own safety, exposed himself to the hostile fire as he moved forward in an attempt to assist his wounded comrades. Before he could reach his objective, Private First Class Sims was mortally wounded. His gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 3215, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (airmobile), 13 May 1968

ST CLAIR, PATRICK
Sergeant, U.S. Army
Joint Army and Air Force raiding force (Son Tay)
Date of Action: 21 November 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant Patrick St Clair, United States Army, who distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 21 November 1970 as a member of an all-volunteer joint US Army and Air Force raiding force in the Joint Chiefs of Staff directed heliborne assault mission to rescue United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at Son Tay prison in North Vietnam. Sergeant St Clair was the first man to debark from a helicopter which crash-landed inside the prison compound. Completely disregarding his personal safety, he moved directly to an exposed area and immediately began placing a heavy volume of automatic rifle fire on the fortified northwest guard tower of the prison. He then maneuvered to his next objective where, he surprised a number of enemy soldiers. Without hesitation, he courageously attacked the soldiers, forcing them to abandon their fortified positions and retreat into the covering fire of a supporting element of the raiding force. He then calmly and deliberately searched and cleared his assigned area of responsibility. Sergeant St Clair’s courageous actions contributed significantly to the successful execution of the mission. His extraordinary heroism against an armed hostile force and extreme devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit on him and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 43, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 9 August 1971

ST. LAWRENCE, LESLIE G.
Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army
Field Epidemiology Survey Team (FEST), 5th Special Forces Group
Date of Action: November 1967
Synopsis: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Leslie G. St. Lawrence, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class St. Lawrence distinguished himself by gallantry in action on November 1967 while serving with Field Epidemiology Survey Team (FEST), 5th Special Forces Group, in Dak To, Kon Tum Province, the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class St. Lawrence exposed himself to enemy fire numerous times, aiding other wounded, while he himself received fragment wounds. An officer, who had one leg virtually severed at thigh level and the other leg severely injured due to a nearby blast from an 82mm mortar round, collapsed near St. Lawrence. Wounded and blown off his feet at least twice in the process of trying to stem the bleeding, the NCO succeeded in getting help to get the wounded man into a bunker for treatment.
General Orders: General Order needed

STRONG, MICHAEL D.
CPT, U.S. Army
1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division
Date of Action: 8 February 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Medical Corps) Michael D. Strong (ASN: 0-5254792), United States Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 8 February 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Captain Strong distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as Battalion Surgeon with the 1st Battalion, 6th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, a rifle company of his battalion came under heavy contact with a reinforced enemy battalion near Lo Giang and were sustaining numerous casualties. Immediately, Captain Strong insisted upon accompanying the first medical evacuation helicopter to go to the aid of the company. Arriving at the company command post, he took charge of caring for the wounded and their immediate evacuation. Despite the fact that the position was still under heavy small arms and mortar fire, Captain Strong moved about the exposed area, treating the seriously wounded, comforting men and ensuring that all wounded men were moved to a central location for treatment and evacuation. When the company launched a counterattack to drive the enemy from the field, more casualties were brought into the command post. Although the position was still receiving hostile fire, Captain Strong courageously made numerous trips into the open rice paddies to pick up wounded men from carrying parties. The immediate and skillful care he was able to provide was instrumental in saving the lives of many soldiers. Captain Strong's conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 3182 (June 13, 1968)

SUGHRUE, TIMOTHY
PFC, U.S. Army
Company A, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 20 May 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Timothy Sughrue, United States Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 20 May 1969. Private First Class Sughrue distinguished himself while serving as a Medical Aidman in Company A, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), during combat operations on Dong Ap Bia Mountain in the A Shau Valley, Republic of Vietnam. As his platoon assaulted the mountain, it began to receive intense small arms fie and rocket propelled grenade fire from a well-entrenched enemy force. Private Sughrue repeatedly subjected himself to enemy fire as he administered medical treatment to his comrades. Private Sughrue remained in the open arranging for the evacuation of the severely injured. Disregarding enemy grenades that were rolled toward him, Private Sughrue continued to administer aid, using his own body as a shield to protect the wounded. When one of his patients' breathing was impaired, he performed a life-saving tracheotomy. Private Sughrue's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 3241 (March 25, 1970)

TENNY, ARTHUR R.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate)
Date of Action: 20 May 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Arthur R. Tenny (ASN: RA-12727483), United States Army, for gallantry in action as a Medical Aidman attached to Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Specialist Fourth Class Tenny distinguished himself on 20 May 1966 while serving as platoon medic attached to a company conducting a search and destroy operation in the Phuoc Tuy Province, Republic of Vietnam. While moving toward their objective, Specialist Fourth Class Tenny's platoon received intense hostile fire from well-fortified Viet Cong emplacements. Since the insurgents had excellent fields of fire, the platoon sustained several casualties. At this time, Specialist Fourth Class Tenny, with complete disregard for his safety, repeatedly exposed himself to the hostile fire as he moved about the battlefield rendering first aid to the wounded. While performing this courageous act, Specialist Fourth Class Tenny received multiple wounds from fragments of a claymore mine that tore into his chest, right leg and arm. Although bleeding profusely, he disregarded his wounds and continued to treat his fallen comrades. Shortly after this a hostile bullet tore into his side, knocking him to the ground. Struggling to his feet, Specialist Fourth Class Tenny went to another wounded man but was unable to aid him because he fell unconscious and had to be evacuated. His extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 5779 (September 22, 1966)
Home of Record: Newark, New Jersey

TIETJEN, MARK ROST
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, Americal Division
Date of Action: 8 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Mark Rost Tietjen (ASN: US-51980766), United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Tietjen distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 8 March 1969 while serving as a medic with Company D, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, Americal Division. On that date, the company was engaged in combat operations near Landing Zone BRONCO when the rifle platoon was ambushed and called for assistance. As Specialist Tietjen moved with his weapons platoon to aid his comrades, they also came under heavy enemy fire from North Vietnamese Army Regulars, and several men were wounded. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Specialist Tietjen
exposed himself to the hostile fire as he treated and carried his comrades to cover. At one point, he crawled to within ten meters of an enemy position to rescue a wounded fellow soldier, and repeated his actions for over an hour until the hostile fire was repulsed. During evacuation operations, Specialist Tietjen braved enemy sniper fire as he supervised the swift removal of the wounded. Through his timely and courageous actions, he saved the lives of many of his fellow soldiers. Specialist Fifth Class Tietjen's personal heroism, professional competence, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 4401, Headquarters, Americal Division, 27 May 1969

*UMSTOT, SAMUEL GILMORE, JR.
Captain, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 280th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Date of Action: 12 September 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Medical Service Corps) Samuel Gilmore Umstot, Jr., United States Army, for gallantry in action as a member of Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 28th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 12 September 1968, Captain Umstot was serving as the Battalion Medical Operations Assistant on a reconnaissance in force operation. As the friendly force proceeded through the treacherous area, it was suddenly subjected to intense rocket propelled grenade, machine gun, and automatic weapons fire from well concealed enemy positions which caused numerous casualties. Exposing himself to the enemy barrage raking the area, Captain Umstot began treating the more seriously wounded and directed their immediate evacuation to more secure locations. When the battle intensified, he continued to supervise the medical aid teams removing the injured soldiers. While moving about the area, he observed several casualties lying near the advancing Viet Cong position. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Umstot maneuvered through the hail of hostile rounds and was mortally wounded while administering first aid to a companion. The exemplary courage, outstanding professional leadership, and selfless concern for his comrades demonstrated by Captain Umstot were instrumental in saving numerous lives, and significantly contributed to the success of the mission. Captain Umstot's unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 10480, Headquarters 1st Infantry Division, 3 October 1968
Home of Record: Keyser, West Virginia

*WEBB, EARL KENNON
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate)
Date of Action: 20 November 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Earl Kennon Webb, United States Army, for gallantry in action. Specialist Fourth Class Webb distinguished himself by heroism in close and heavy combat with an armed hostile force on 20 November 1967 during the battle on Hill 875, Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Specialist Webb was attached to the company as a Platoon Aidman when it came under heavy mortar, rocket and automatic weapons fire. With complete disregard for his own safety, he moved about the battlefield giving aid and comfort to his wounded comrades. Specialist Webb kept many of the severely wounded from dying by sitting by their side and administering aid until they could be extracted. He was fatally wounded during an enemy mortar attack after having refused to leave the side of his seriously wounded comrades. Specialist Webb’s professional skills and untiring efforts saved numerous lives and assisted greatly in the accomplishment of the mission. Specialist Webb’s unselfish and valorous actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Medical Corps and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 33, Headquarters, 1 Field Force Vietnam, 16 January 1968
Home of Record: New Orleans, LA

WELLS, DALE R.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 1st Battalion, 52nd Infantry Regiment, Americal Division
Date of Action: 13 – 19 February 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Dale R. Wells, United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Wells distinguished himself by intrepid actions during the period 13 February 1969 to 19 February 1969, while service as a Medic with Company D, 1st Battalion, 52d Infantry Regiment, Americal Division. On 13 February, the company was conducting search and clear operations near Landing Zone Young when the point element came under intense enemy automatic weapons and small arms fire which wounded several friendly soldiers. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Specialist Wells rushed from his relatively secure position and maneuvered through the hostile fire to aid his injured comrades and pull them to safety. The following morning, the unit encountered a large enemy force near Tien Phuoc. During the engagement, the forward element was pinned down by the well entrenched enemy force. Again, Specialist Wells unhesitatingly went to aid the casualties, crawling beneath the grazing fire and dragging his fellow soldiers to the safety of rice paddy dikes in the area. On 19 February, the company engaged an enemy force for the third time and most of the medics were injured in the initial barrage of fire. Specialist Wells assumed the responsibility of treating the large number of casualties and repeatedly exposed himself to the insurgents as he aided his comrades. His courageous actions throughout this period were directly responsible for saving the lives of many of his fellow soldiers. Specialist Fourth Class Wells' personal heroism, professional competence, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, Americal Division, General Orders No. 6272 (July 10, 1969)

*WEST, NOEL THOMAS
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 4th Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 19 June 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Noel Thomas West (ASN: US-56427096), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medic with Company A, 4th Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class West distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions 19 June 1967, while serving as a medical corpsman with his unit on a search-and-destroy mission near the village of Can Giouc, Vietnam. As the allied force was traversing a muddy rice paddy, they were met by a hail of automatic and semi-automatic fire from a well-entrenched Viet Cong force concealed in a clump of trees. Immediately upon receiving fire, West, in complete disregard for his own safety, began to treat the wounded. As bullets pounded the ground and filled the air around him, West dashed from casualty to casualty, rendering aid that in several cases proved to be of a life-saving nature. Hostile machine gun fire sprayed the rice paddy, and West, while aiding yet another wounded soldier, was hit and mortally wounded. West gave his life in order that others might live; he was an inspiration to the men around him. West's heroic actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Tacoma, Washington

WYNNE, OSCAR B., III
Warrant Officer, U.S. Army
45th Medical Company, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 7 December 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Warrant Officer One (WO-1) Oscar B. Wynne, III (ASN: W-3156390), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Wynne distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 7 December 1967, as Pilot of an Ambulance Helicopter of the 45th Medical Company, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade, on a rescue mission near Cu Chi. Mister Wynne received an urgent request to evacuate twelve seriously wounded men and immediately flew to the battle area. He did this despite the knowledge that several rescue ships had previously been shot down in the area. He made an unhampered landing and his crew began loading the patients. Murderous enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire suddenly erupted from a nearby tree line, riddling his helicopter. With four casualties loaded, he ordered the medic and crew chief to climb aboard and took off to prevent further damage to the ship. The hostile barrage in the landing zone ceased, and he returned to rescue the remainder of the casualties. The enemy force launched a second fusillade on his ship, and he was wounded as rounds tore into the craft. Ignoring his wound and mounting damage to the helicopter, he remained on the ground until all of the injured were loaded. He then took off and skillfully nursed the badly crippled ship to an airfield. Warrant Officer Wynne's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1203 (March 19, 1968)