U.S. Army Medical Department, Army Medical Department Regiment
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ABOUT THE AMEDD REGIMENT

AMEDD HERALDIC ITEMS

ARMY AWARDS FOR VALOR AND THEIR CRITERIA

AMEDD MEDAL OF HONOR

CERTIFICATE OF MERIT

AMEDD DISTINGUISHED SERVICE CROSS

AMEDD SILVER STAR

DISTINGUISHED FLYING CROSS

SOLDIER'S MEDAL

BRONZE STAR WITH "V" DEVICE

AMEDD NCO/ENLISTED HISTORY

COMMAND SERGEANTS MAJOR OF HSC/MEDCOM

AMEDD REGIMENTAL MUSIC

COMBAT MEDIC PRAYER

AMEDD POSTERS

ORDER OF MILITARY MEDICAL MERIT (02M3)

Vietnam War, Page 1, A-K

AMEDD Silver Star

Interesting Notes:

Specialist Four Gordon W. Gaskin also earned the Distinguished Service Cross, Bronze Star with "V" device, and the ARCOM with "V" device while in Vietnam

SSG Koutrouba earned the Silver Star an incredible three times. In addition, he also earned two Bronze Stars with "V" device during his tours in Vietnam.

In addition to his Silver Star, Major Charles Kelly earned the Distinguished Service Cross where he was repeatedly advised to withdraw from his hazardous medical evacuation mission because of heavy fire but replied the now famous "When I have your wounded". His Distinguished Service Cross.

In addition to his Silver Star, First Lieutenant Ronald A. Huether also earned the Distinguished Flying Cross in Vietnam.

SPC Floyd Gordon Book Jr earned two Silver Stars for his service in Vietnam. His first was as a Marine Lance Corporal in 1967. He returned to Vietnam as a Army Medical Aidman and earned his second Silver Star in 1969.

Major James A. Eberwine also earned the Distinguished Flying Cross and Bronze Star with “V” device.

Warrant Officer Reinis Fox, a dust-off helicopter pilot, earned the Silver Star twice in Vietnam.

Private First Class Dennis Wayne Hoff earned the Silver Star twice in Vietnam.

Specialist Four Santiago Aguirre earned the Bronze Star with "V" device in addition to his Silver Star

LTC Joseph Cataldo earned his Silver Star as part of the Son Tay Volunteer Task Force.

In addition to his Silver Star, Specialist Four Michael J. Hart earned the Bronze Star with "V" device.

Chief Warrant Officer Robert L. Horst, a medical evacuation pilot, also earned the Distinguished Service Cross in Vietnam. Link

In addition to his Silver Star, SSG Charles Allen earned the Bronze Star with "V" device 4 times and the ARCOM with "V" device. These were all earned in one year.

Private First Class Michael A. Esmond also received the Bronze Star in Vietnam. He was chosen to introduce Bob Hope at the 1967 Christmas Show at Chu Lai, Vietnam. Read and see about that event by visiting the AMEDD Historian newsletter http://history.amedd.army.mil/newsletters/AMEDD_history_newsletter_No_11.pdf

Major Kushner, an Ophthalmologist, earned his Silver Star while a POW. He was taken as a Prisoner of War on November 30, 1967 and was held until his release on March 16, 1973. He is believed to be the only doctor held as a POW in the Vietnam War.

* Denotes Posthumous Award

AGUIRRE, SANTIAGO
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 1st Battalion (Abn), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 2 July 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Santiago Aguirre, United States Army, for gallantry in action. Private First Class Aguirre distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 2 July 1967, while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Company A, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during combat operations near Tuy An, Republic of Vietnam. When two platoons of Private First Class Aguirre's company came under fire from a well entrenched enemy force, several casualties were suffered, including the company commander. Immediately racing to the fallen commander's side, Private First Class Aguirre did all he could for the officer before removing him to the rear for medical evacuation. Instantly, Private First Class Aguirre was forward again giving aid to the wounded while receiving a hail of enemy small arms fire. Constantly moving from one exposed position to another, he never stopped his work nor let his own safety take precedence over the welfare of the men in need of his services. His actions instilled confidence in all who observed him and saved countless lives. Private First Class Aguirre's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), General Orders No. 5377 (September 10, 1967)

ALLEN, CHARLES K.
Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army
57th Ambulance Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance, 436th Medical Detachment, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 1 April 1965
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Charles K. Allen (ASN: RA-14489916), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Allen distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 1 April 1965, while serving as Medic aboard a helicopter of the 57th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), 436th Medical Detachment, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade, 1st Logistic Command, during the evacuation of casualties from combat areas near Duc Hoa. Sergeant Allen's helicopter landed next to one which had crashed between the friendly and hostile forces. While the crew chief went to the wreckage to bring out the downed crew, Sergeant Allen jumped out of the aircraft and crawled forward to where he could cover the rescue. His move drew intense fire from the Viet Cong, but he held his position until the downed men were safely aboard. He then returned and the helicopter took off. Later, his pilot landed, while receiving a tremendous barrage of fire, to pick up a wounded American advisor. When he saw Vietnamese casualties approaching the aircraft, Sergeant Allen ran out to assist them. Before they had gone more than a few feet, some of them were hit by the Viet Cong fire which continuously tore up the ground around the aircraft and destroyed much of a rice paddy dike nearby. Heedless of mortar shrapnel and the incessant hail of fire, Sergeant Allen calmly remained exposed while helping casualties on board. As soon as the helicopter left the ground, he began to administer first aid. His dauntless courage under fire enabled him to save the lives of many wounded. Sergeant First Class Allen's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 1904 (April 25, 1967)

*ALTHOFF, RODNEY EUGENE
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Divsion
Date of Action: 4 November 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Rodney Eugene Althoff (ASN: RA-13858503), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with the 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Althoff distinguished himself by heroic actions on 4 November 1966, in the Republic of Vietnam. He was attached to
Company C as a Platoon Medic on a search and destroy mission in the dense jungles near Dau Tieng, Republic of Vietnam. As the company moved through the thick jungle underbrush, they received heavy machine gun and automatic weapons fire, and a heavy grenade barrage. Several men were wounded, one of which was Specialist Althoff, who has hit by fragments from an enemy grenade. Refusing to leave the hostile fire zone, and disregarding his own wounds, he moved from man to man, giving them aid and reassurance. While in the process of giving aid to his wounded comrades, Specialist Althoff was wounded a second time from small arms fire, which caused his death. His bravery and complete disregard for his own safety resulted in the saving of lives and the receiving of professional medical aid by the wounded men in his area. Specialist Althoff's aggressiveness, devotion to duty, and unimpeachable valor reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

AUGERSON, WILLIAM S.
Lieutenant Colonel, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Americal Division
Date of Action: 8 January 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel William S. Augerson, Medical Corps, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 8 January 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Lieutenant Colonel Augerson distinguished himself by intrepid actions while serving as the Americal Division Surgeon. On that date, he was making liaison visits to fire support bases during a period of heavy contact with an element of the North Vietnamese Army. When a call for an emergency evacuation came in, Colonel Augerson volunteered to fly into the evacuation area as a medical attendant. Upon sighting a smoke signal from the ground, the pilot began his approach when the helicopter was suddenly taken under intense enemy fire. Without hesitation, colonel Augerson went to the door of the helicopter and engaged the enemy with an M-16 rifle. Upon landing, he quickly leaped from the aircraft and immediately went to the aid of the wounded. Although he was continually exposed to the hostile fire, Colonel Augerson expertly cared for the wounded and prepared them for evacuation. His total disregard for his own safety and his avid devotion to duty were responsible for saving the lives of at least two wounded soldiers. Lieutenant Colonel Augerson’s unquestionable valor in close combat and unselfish concern for his fellow soldiers are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order’s number 1078, Headquarters Americal Division, 29 February 1968

*BAKER, PHILIP LOU
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 3 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Philip Lou Baker (ASN: NG-26829658), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Baker distinguished himself while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company A, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 3 March 1969, Specialist Fourth Class Baker's company was approaching a ridge line when it was suddenly subjected to intense enemy automatic weapons, mortar and grenade fire from well concealed positions. Seeing several of his wounded comrades exposed to the enemy fire, Specialist Fourth Class Baker maneuvered forward and carried several of the wounded to positions of safety. Continually exposing himself to the hostile fire, Specialist Fourth Class Baker aided his wounded comrades until he was mortally wounded. Specialist Fourth Class Baker's courageous actions, determination and exemplary devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

*BANGERT, ROGER CARL
Corporal, U.S. Army
Company B, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 22 January 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal [then Private First Class] Roger Carl Bangert (ASN: US-56505290), United States Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Bangert distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 22 January 1969 while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company B, 2d Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, on a reconnaissance in force mission in Dinh Tuong. After his platoon came under intense hostile fire as they moved across an open rice paddy toward a woodline, Private Bangert saw that one of his comrades was seriously wounded and lying in an exposed position. He courageously left a position of relative safety and ran through the fusillade of enemy fire to reach the man, but was mortally wounded himself, as he started to administer aid to his comrade. Private First Class Bangert's extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

BERGEM. JOHN A.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 30 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class John A. Bergen, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 30 March 1969 while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company D, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date when the company made contact with a large, heavily-fortified enemy force, one of the friendly vehicles almost immediately received two direct anti-tank rocket hits, seriously wounding three of the crew members. Ignoring the intense hostile automatic weapons and small arms fire, Specialist Bergen ran seventy-five meters through exposed terrain to the disabled vehicle. After quickly moving two of the casualties to the relative safety of the rear of the vehicle, he began attempting to extract the wounded driver. Although Specialist Bergen was wounded and knocked to the ground by another impacting anti-tank rocket, he immediately remounted the vehicle and resumed his efforts to rescue the wounded driver. In spite of additional wounds that he sustained from enemy small arms fire, Specialist Bergen succeeded in moving his wounded comrade to safety. Disregarding his own wounds and the hostile fusillade, Specialist Bergen administered medical assistance to the wounded personnel until he was assured that all of them had been properly treated. Only then did he have his wounds cared for. Specialist Fourth Class Bergen's outstanding courage, devotion to duty and deep concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 1814 (July 23, 1969)

*BEST, RICHARD JAMES JR.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2nd Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 7 September 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Richard James Best, Jr., United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 7 September 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company D, 2d Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 9th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date during a night operation in Long An Province, Specialist Best moved a wounded comrade to a landing zone for evacuation. As a helicopter approached the pick-up area, the two men on the ground came under intense enemy small arms and rocket-propelled grenade fire. Disregarding his own safety, Specialist Best remained with his weakened comrade. Although he was wounded by hostile fire, Specialist Best stayed in the exposed position and provided assistance until he succumbed to his wounds. Nevertheless, as a result of his efforts, the other man was safely evacuated. Specialist Fourth Class Best's courage, devotion to duty and concern for the welfare of his comrade were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

BLACK, JOHN R
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Troop G, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 28 March 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class John R. Black (ASN: US-54437091), United States Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Black distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 March 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Troop G, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, on a road securing mission in War Zone C, Tay Ninh Province, Vietnam. When an unknown sized Viet Cong force attacked the convoy, a soldier received a head wound from an explosion of a rocket round, resulting in severe loss of blood and a condition of semi-delirium. The wounded man dismounted his vehicle and began running aimlessly toward the incoming fire. Completely disregarding his personal safety, Private First Class Black ran through the hail of fire, tackled the man and pulled him to the ground. Although pinned down by the intensity of the hostile fire, Private First Class Black shielded the casualty with his own body while administering first aid. Private First Class Black's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 3678 (May 22, 1968)

*BLANCHETT, STEPHEN PAUL
PFC, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 7 March 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Stephen Paul Blanchett (ASN: 12728274), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military conflict against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Blanchett distinguished himself by exceptional valor while serving as Medical Specialist for his unit when it came under heavy small arms fire in rice paddies northwest of Dong Tam, Vietnam, on 7 March 1967. As the unit was maneuvering slowly through several rice paddies, they came under enemy sniper fire. Immediately, one of the unit's leaders was hit and severely wounded. Private Blanchett, 350 meters to the rear, was notified, and began racing through the paddies in order to reach the wounded man. When he had come to within 50 meters of the casualty, he was urged by fellow comrades to go no further, due to the increasing amount of hostile fire. He courageously disregarded the warning and with fire all about him, ran to the side of the wounded man. He then pulled the wounded man behind the safety of a dike separating two paddies and administered vitally needed first aid. This courageous act was one of many times he unhesitatingly risked his life in behalf of his fellow soldiers. Private First Class Blanchett's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

BLAND, NOLLIE ANDREW
PFC, U.S. Army
Battery B, 2d Howitzer Battalion, 320th Artillery, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division
Date of Action: 7 June 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Nollie Andrew Bland (ASN: RA-16814302), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Private First Class Bland distinguished himself while serving as a Medic attached to Battery B, 2d Howitzer Battalion, 320th Artillery, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. At 0200 hours the battery position was attacked from the west by a large Viet Cong force. Private First Class Bland immediately ran entirely across the battery area while under intense small arms fire and grenade attacks to treat the first of many casualties. He immediately raced to the forefront of the fighting and recklessly exposed himself time and time again to enemy fire from 10 to 15 meters away to treat and recover all friendly wounded. When it became necessary to bring medical evacuation helicopters in, he calmly and professionally supervised the evacuation although the battery was still under heavy small arms fire. Though painfully wounded with fragments in his knee cap, he returned to the area of most intense fighting and continued to care for the wounded. When Gun #6 was overrun for the second time he was the last man forced out of the position. After sun up when a force of 40 - 50 Viet Cong on the hill to the north continued to bring heavy fire on the area, Private First Class Bland again walked through the area and supervised the loading of two more groups of wounded. He continued to expose himself fearlessly until the end of the action at about 0900 hours. He refused to be evacuated until forced to go out with the last load. Private First Class Bland's devotion to duty and personal gallantry are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, I Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 416 (October 26, 1966)
Home of Record: Evansville, Indiana

BOOK, FLOYD GORDON, JR.
Lance Corporal, U.S. Marine Corps
Combined Action Platoon D-1, Sub-Unit ONE, Service Company, Headquarters Battalion, 1st Marine Division
Date of Action: 5 June 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star (Navy Award) to Lance Corporal Floyd Gordon Book, Jr., United States Marine Corps, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Fire Team Leader with Combined Action Platoon D-1, Sub-Unit ONE, Service Company, Headquarters Battalion, FIRST Marine Division in connection with operations against insurgent communist (Viet Cong) forces in the Republic of Vietnam on 5 June 1967. During a patrol in the Tra Khe (2) area, Lance Corporal Book observed the patrol's radioman fall into a camouflaged punji pit and heard the fuse of a Viet Cong grenade activated by the Marine's fall. Reacting instantly, he warned his companions of the danger and quickly moved to his comrade's aid. With complete disregard for his own safety, Lance Corporal Book pulled the radioman from the pit and pushed him away as the grenade exploded harmlessly. His timely and courageous actions at great personal risk were an inspiration to all who observed him and undoubtedly saved his companion's life. By his courage, bold initiative and selfless devotion to duty, Lance Corporal Book upheld the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and of the United States Naval Service.
Home of Record: Hammond, Indiana

BOOK, FLOYD GORDON, JR.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 7 September 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Floyd Gordon Book, Jr. (ASN: US-MC-2130395), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Book distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 7 September 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) in the Republic of Vietnam. When his unit made heavy contact with a large enemy force, Specialist Fourth Class Book, with complete disregard for his own safety, moved forward to the point of most intense conflict and began assisting with return fire. When he noticed an enemy soldier about to throw a grenade into a concentration of friendly forces, he reacted quickly exposing himself to heavy fire in order to kill the enemy. On numerous occasions, Specialist Fourth Class Book assisted in knocking out enemy positions, using his knowledge of the enemy's language to encourage their surrender. His display of personal bravery and devotion to duty is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Hammond, Indiana

*BROWDER, JEROME ALBERT JR.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
Advisory Team, Senior Aidman
Date of Action: 10 June 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Staff Sergeant Jerome Albert Browder, Jr. (ASN: 25347391), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Staff Sergeant Browder distinguished himself by gallantry in action on 10 June 1969 while serving as Senior Aidman, Duy Xuyen District, Quang Nam Province, Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant Browder was returning to Duy Xuyen when he met members of an advisory team from Dien Ban who were withdrawing, along with two Regional Forces companies, from heavy contact in the vicinity of Triem Tu. With the withdrawal of American advisors, there were no Americans present to maintain contact with the forward air controller, Sergeant Browder elected to remain as radio operator. He made contact with the Regional Forces company and began calling in artillery on the enemy mortar positions. While moving forward to the open paddy area, the senior advisor for Duy Xuyen District was wounded in the right arm and shoulder. In his exposed position some fifty meters away from the hostile force, Sergeant Browder, with no regard for his personal safety, began immediate first aid treatment. Staff Sergeant Browder's conspicuous gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 4333, Headquarters, Military Assistance Command, Vietnam 21 July 1969
Home of Record: Knoxville, TN

*BROWNING, GARY LEE
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
2nd Platoon, Company D, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th Infantry Brigade
Date of Action: 18 September 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Gary Lee Browning (ASN: 55989381), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving as a Medical Aidman with the 2d platoon of Company D, 1st Battalion, 20th Infantry Regiment, 11th Infantry Brigade, in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 September 1968. On that date, Company D, was engaged on a combat operation near the village of Go Tro. When his platoon leader was wounded by machinegun fire from an enemy ambush, Specialist Browning immediately ran to his aid, heedless of the danger around him, he continued to apply first aid until he was struck and mortally wounded by an enemy .30 caliber machinegun bullet. Specialist Four Browning's personal heroism, unselfish concern for his fellow soldiers and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Hutchinson, Kansas

BRYANT, JACK
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 18 July 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Jack Bryant, United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 18 July 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Specialist Bryant was participating in a mounted sweep operation being conducted through a rubber plantation when the friendly force was suddenly engaged by a North Vietnamese Army patrol with an intense volume of small arms, automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenade fire. In the opening moments of the battle, Specialist Bryant was painfully wounded and rendered unconscious. Regaining consciousness only to find himself temporarily blinded, he calmly waited until his vision returned and then moved to assist the friendly casualties. Specialist Bryant repeatedly exposed himself to the intense enemy fire as he moved among the wounded administering emergency first aid. After he had treated five wounded soldiers, he unhesitatingly took command of an armored cavalry assault vehicle and drove it two kilometers under enemy fire to the nearest landing zone from which the friendly casualties could be evacuated. Throughout the battle, Specialist Bryant served as a source of inspiration to his comrades and was responsible for saving of many American lives. Specialist Fourth Class Bryant's courage in the face of intense enemy fire and selfless devotion to the welfare of his comrades in arms were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 1538 (October 28, 1968)

BUNNELL, DERALD R.
Sergeant First Class, Army Medical Department, US Army
Detachment B-55, 5th Mobile Strike Force Command, 5th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces
Date of Action: 7 and 8 October 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918, a Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Sergeant first Class Derald R. Bunnell, United States Army, who distinguished himself by acts of heroism on 7 and 8 October 1968 while serving as Senior Medical Corpsman, Detachment B-55, 5th Mobile Strike Force Command, 5th Special Forces Group, 1st Special Forces, in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a reconnaissance in force mission, on 7 October, the 5th Mobile Strike Force made contact with a large, well-entrenched enemy force. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Sergeant Bunnell led a small force through a hail of small arms and automatic weapons fire in order to establish flank security. As tactical air strikes and artillery fire pounded the enemy positions, Sergeant Bunnell moved throughout the battle area, treating wounded and encouraging his comrades. When tactical air strikes and artillery fire ceased, his unit again advanced against the enemy positions. Heavy accurate, enemy mortar, small arms, and automatic weapons fire forced his unit to withdraw to a secure position to evacuate the wounded. During the early morning hours of 8 October, Sergeant Bunnell’s unit was again subjected to intense enemy rocket and mortar fire, accompanied by a 3 pronged ground attack. After two platoons of his unit were overrun, Sergeant Bunnell gathered stragglers, redistributed ammunition, and led his men as they fought to escape the enemy encirclement. Sergeant First Class Bunnell’s courage and leadership were in keeping with the most cherished traditions of the military service and reflected great credit on him, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 15, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 30 March 1972

*BURNS, DEAN HARRY
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 30 March 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Dean Harry Burns (ASN: US-56831070), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Burns distinguished himself while serving as a Medical Aidman with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 30 March 1968, while attached to Company A of the Battalion, Private First Class Burns was participating in a vital search and destroy operation a few miles northwest of Kontum City. As the unit cautiously moved through the mountainous jungle terrain, it discovered a well-concealed enemy bunker complex and was immediately immobilized by heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire before evasive action could be taken. Several men in the lead element were wounded in the initial burst of enemy fire. Seeing the need for his medical assistance, Private First Class Burns moved through the intense hostile fire to reach each injured man's position. After administering aid, he moved each man to a safer position. He continued his mission of mercy until all were evacuated. On the afternoon of 31 March 1968, his unit was again subjected to heavy enemy automatic weapons and mortar fire. The forward element received most of the initial burst of hostile fire. Private First Class Burns ran a distance of seventy-five meters to reach the wounded, keeping just ahead of a steady stream of well-directed hostile automatic weapons fire. Reaching the injured, he carried them, one by one, to a safer position through a barrage of fire. As he was returning the last man to the covered position, he was mortally wounded by the enemy fire. His exceptional gallantry in rendering aid to his injured comrades clearly saved their lives and greatly inspired the members of the unit in successfully defeating the enemy assault. Private First Class Burns' exceptional gallantry, persevering concern for the welfare of his comrades and exemplary devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1688, Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, 25 April 1968
Home of Record: Sonoma, CA

CARINDER, CHARLES E.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company E, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate)
Date of Action: 21 August 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Charles E. Carinder (ASN: US-56583614), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Specialist Fourth Class Carinder distinguished himself by exceptionally gallant actions against an armed hostile force on 21 August 1968, while serving as a combat medic for Company E, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate), near the town of Di Linh, Ham Dong Province, Republic of Vietnam. On this date, at approximately 0930 hours, Specialist Carinder's unit came under heavy mortar, rocket, automatic weapons and small arms fire followed immediately with a ground assault by a numerically superior enemy force. He was wounded in the back by shrapnel early in the battle. Completely disregarding his own painful wounds, Specialist Carinder moved from position to position administering first aid to the wounded. While treating these individuals, he noticed that the enemy was threatening to overrun a portion of the perimeter. Without hesitation, he moved through intense enemy fire toward the threatened portion and rallied the regional forces occupying bunkers in that section to greater efforts in repelling the enemy. Repeatedly exposing himself to the murderous volume of hostile small arms and mortar fire, Specialist Carinder continued to treat the wounded and was again wounded in the back by shrapnel. In spite of the pain endured from the additional wounds, he again refused medical aid for himself. Throughout the entire battle, while jeopardizing his own safety to aid others, Specialist Carinder's display of personal bravery and dedication to his fellow soldiers was an inspiration to all who observed him. Specialist Carinder's conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

CARR, ROBERT HOWARD, JR.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 15 June 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Robert Howard Carr, Jr. (ASN: RA-12737335), United States Army, for gallantry in action. On 15 June 1966, Private First Class Carr distinguished himself in an outstanding manner in the performance of his duties as a Medical Aidman with Company B, 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) in the Republic of Vietnam. While moving through jungle en route to join another unit, Company B came under attack by an estimated Viet Cong squad. During the raging battle, Company B suffered many casualties. Although not with the platoon in contact, Private First Class Carr heard the cries of "Medic" from the distance. With complete disregard for his own safety, he advanced to his comrades to render first aid. Upon coming under fire, Private First Class Carr was warned to stay in his relatively safe place until the intense machine gun and small arms fire had ceased, and then proceeded to aid the wounded. Devoted to duty, he answered, "That's my job," and aggressively proceeded to the aid of his fellow soldiers. Private First Class Carr, armed with only a pistol and a medical aid bag, braved the intense automatic weapons fire to reach a wounded soldier. While administering lifesaving aid, Private First Class Carr fell mortally wounded. His courage, determination, and devotion to duty under the most adverse conditions saved the life of a fallen soldier at the cost of his own. Private First Class Carr's gallantry in action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

CARRILLO, ARMANDO D.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Aero Rifle Platoon, Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 4 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Armando D. Carrillo (ASN: US-19673968), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 4 March 1969 while serving as a Medic with the Aero Rifle Platoon, Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date when the platoon encountered a large enemy force in a well-fortified bunker complex, two of Specialist Carrillo's comrades were critically wounded and fell in an area exposed to the hostile fire. Disregarding his own safety, he crawled out through the intense enemy machine gun fire to the open area where his wounded comrades lay. After carrying one to a relatively secure area, he returned through the hostile fire and moved the other soldier to safety. While he was administering first aid to the casualties, Specialist Carrillo was seriously wounded by a burst of automatic weapons fire. In spite of his wounds, he continued to treat his wounded comrades until an evacuation helicopter arrived. Only after he had carried his comrades to the aircraft and had been assured that all of the wounded were on board did he consent to his own evacuation. Specialist Fifth Class Carrillo's outstanding courage and selfless concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 1193 (May 17, 1969)

CATALDO, JOSEPH R.
LTC, U.S. Army
Son Tay Volunteer Task Force
Date of Action: 21 November 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Lieutenant Colonel (Medical Corps) Joseph R. Cataldo, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 21 November 1970 as a member of an all-volunteer joint U.S. Army and Air Force raiding force in the Joint Chiefs of Staff-directed heliborne assault mission to rescue United States military personnel held as prisoners of war at Son Tay prison in North Vietnam. This valiant effort was motivated by a deep compassion for his imprisoned comrades and a strong sense of military duty and national pride. Colonel Cataldo, a member of the command group of the raiding force, landed in the target area in the second assault helicopter. As he moved to his assigned security position, he came under fire from the enemy guard quarters. Disregarding this threat, he was able to establish his position and prepare to receive the released prisoners of war and wounded personnel. When the assault plan was suddenly changed, he was able to assist the leader of the command group in recalling his elements. To do so, he exposed himself once again to enemy small arms fire from across the landing zone. When airborne in the extraction helicopter he continued to administer to the wounded and injured while the helicopter was maneuvering violently in an effort to evade enemy Surface-to-Air Missiles. Colonel Cataldo's gallant and unselfish actions reflect great credit upon himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 43 (August 9, 1971)

CHAVEZ, RAMIRO
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light)
Date of Action: 7 May 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Ramiro Chavez (ASN: US-54719973), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action against the enemy while serving while serving as a Senior Medic with Company D, 4th Battalion, 12th Infantry, 199th Infantry Brigade (Separate) (Light). Specialist Chavez distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 7 May 1968. On this date, Delta Company came under heavy small arms, automatic weapons and machine gun fire from an entrenched North Vietnamese Army battalion outside Long An. Specialist Chavez, with complete disregard for his own life, crawled and ran ten yards over open terrain while under constant enemy machine gun and automatic weapons fire to reach the wounded squad leader. While in an exposed position and under intense enemy fire, he administered life saving first aid. Specialist Chavez and another soldier continued to expose themselves to enemy fire while dragging and carrying the wounded Soldier to safety. Specialist Four Chavez' gallantry and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the Military Service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Corpus Christi, Texas

*CHOPPA, RICHARD A.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 15 December 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Corporal [then Private First Class] Richard Anthony Choppa (ASN: US-51830317), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Choppa distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 15 December 1967, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a combat mission near Troung Lam, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit came under intense hostile fire and sustained casualties, Private First Class Choppa exposed himself to the enemy fire as he rushed forward to render first aid to an injured comrade. After carrying him to safety, Private First Class Choppa returned to the open area to administer first aid to other wounded men. At this time, Private First Class Choppa was wounded but continued assisting the fallen soldiers. While rendering aid, he was mortally wounded. Private First Class Choppa's gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order 315, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 15 January 1968
Home of Record: Hubbard, Ohio

CLARK, GLENN M.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 18 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Glenn M. Clark, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 18 March 1969 while serving as a Medic with Company D, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Company D was conducting a reconnaissance-in-force mission in the Michelin Rubber Plantation when it was suddenly engaged by an estimated battalion-size force of North Vietnamese Army regulars in well-concealed, fortified bunkers. In the ensuing battle, the tank commander of one of the vehicles was seriously wounded by rocket-propelled grenade fragments. Specialist Clark immediately dismounted his vehicle and made his way through hostile fire to the wounded tank commander. After tending to the man's wounds, he observed a second tank receive a damaging rocket-propelled grenade hit. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Clark ran across the open ground to treat the wounded. Ignoring the intense barrage of hostile fire, he quickly applied first aid and then unhesitatingly took command of the tank and moved it to the rear so the wounded could be evacuated. Specialist Clark then maneuvered the vehicle back to the assaulting line where it rejoined the fierce firefight. For the remainder of the three-hour battle, he continued to offer assistance and encouragement to his comrades. Specialist Fifth Class Clark's deep concern for the welfare of his fellow men, personal courage and unwavering devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 1798 (July 21, 1969)

*CONRARDY, RICHARD JOHN
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 2nd Battalion (Airmobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 2 July 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Richard John Conrardy, United States Army, for gallantry in action in the Republic of Vietnam on 2 July 1970. Private Conrardy distinguished himself while serving as a Medical Aidman in Company C, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 506th Infantry Regiment, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile), during combat operations in Thua Thien Province, Republic of Vietnam. While set up in a night defensive position, Private Conrardy's unit came under attack by a force of North Vietnamese Army sappers, who breached the perimeter at one point. When the command post came under a particularly intense assault, the platoon leader was seriously wounded, and Private Conrardy immediately abandoned his covered position to aid the wounded man. Moving through the enemy barrage, Private Conrardy had just reached the casualty when he was mortally wounded by an enemy satchel charge. His actions were an inspiration to his fellow soldiers. Private Conrardy's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 9354, Headquarters, 101st Airborne Division (Airmobile) 15 August 1970
Home of Record: Wright, KS

COUPER, JOHN M.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 6 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class John M. Couper (ASN: US-54828745), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Couper distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 6 March 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a combat assault in Tinh Bien Hoa Province, Republic of Vietnam. After air assaulting into a recently cut landing zone, the lead element of his company came under heavy enemy fire and sustained several casualties. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Fourth Class Couper crawled through the intense hostile fire in order to treat the casualties. Exhibiting exceptional regard for his fellow soldiers, Specialist Fourth Class Couper remained in his exposed position throughout the engagement until all the wounded had been evacuated to safety. His actions undoubtedly saved several lives. Specialist Fourth Class Couper's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 4497 (April 12, 1969)

COVENTRY, ROBERT E.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Troop B, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 7 July 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Robert E. Coventry, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 7 July 1969, while serving as a Medic with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date while conducting a reconnaissance operation, the troop came under intense small arms, automatic weapons, machine gun and rocket-propelled grenade fire from a well-concealed enemy force. In the initial contact a vehicle near Specialist Coventry received a direct rocket-propelled grenade hit, wounding all of the crew members. Disregarding his own safety, he ran through the hostile fusillade to aid the casualties. Continuing to expose himself to the enemy fire, he administered aid to the most critically wounded man. While helping to evacuate the casualty, Specialist Coventry was wounded seriously when a rocket-propelled grenade impacted nearby. Despite his wounds he continued to aid the other wounded personnel. He did not consent to board an evacuation helicopter until he had ensured that all of the other casualties had been given the necessary aid and had been evacuated. Specialist Fourth Class Coventry's courage, devotion to duty and concern for the welfare of his fellow soldiers were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, General Orders No. 3057 (October 23, 1969)

CROWNER, CARL L.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 1st Battalion, 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade
Date of Action: 11 November 1967
Citation: (General Order needed)
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Carl L. Crowner, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 11 November 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Five Crowner distinguished himself by conspicuous gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while acting as senior company aidman for Company C, 1st Battalion an, 503d Infantry, on 11 November 1967. On that day, at approximately 0930 hours while on Operation MacArthur, Company C was hit by a battalion size enemy force equipped with the latest Communist armaments. Company C immediately received several casualties from the heavy automatic weapons and mortar fire. Specialist Crowner took account of the situation and ran through a heavy volume of fire and mortar bursts to the point element of the company to treat the wounded. As the mortar shells continued to come, casualties began to mount. Although he was wounded in both hands by shrapnel, Specialist Crowner moved up and down the line, treating the wounded and carrying and dragging them to cover on the adjacent hill. After he had secured all the known casualties of his platoon, Specialist Crowner’s attention was drawn to two wounded men at the bottom of the valley who were unable to move. With complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Crowner moved down the hill in the midst of a heavy volume of grenade, automatic weapons and mortar fire. After arriving at the position of the two wounded men, he was again wounded; this time in the back while using his body as a shield to protect the man he was working on. Ignoring his own wounds, Specialist Crowner dragged one man and pushed and carried the other up the hill to the main body of the fighting element. During the nine hours of heavy fighting, Specialist Crowner’s courage was a direct inspiration to the men of Company C. He was responsible for saving the lives of numerous wounded personnel. Specialist Crowner’s gallantry under fire, compassion for the wounded and dedication to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number unknown, Headquarters, 173d Airborne Brigade

*CUMBERPATCH, JAMES R. JR
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
C Company, 2nd Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 23 June 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class James R. Cumberpatch, Jr. (ASN: RA-13819927), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 23 June 1966, while serving as a medical aid man attached to Company C, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division, Specialist Four Cumberpatch demonstrated courage, devotion to duty, and professional competence which contributed to the defeat of a platoon size force of North Vietnamese Army Regulars. When the heavily fortified and well concealed enemy opened fire upon the advancing unit automatic and small arms, Specialist Four Cumberpatch repeatedly exposed himself to intense and accurate hostile fire. During the height of the battle, when a wounded soldier was stranded on a rocky ledge, Specialist Four Cumberpatch volunteered to climb to him and render first aid. In the process, he was wounded in the leg, but proceeded to crawl to the wounded soldier's aid. Once having reached him, Specialist Four Cumberpatch then located an enemy sniper and directed machine gun fire upon him, disregarding a warning to remain silent. Having exposed himself to hostile fire once more, Specialist Four Cumberpatch was wounded again, this time mortally. Specialist Four Cumberpatch's conspicuous gallantry is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division, General Orders No. 2767 (August 11, 1966)
Home of Record: Bethesda, Maryland

CURTIS, DANA
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 2nd Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 23 May 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Dana Curtis (ASN: RA-68046218), United States Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Curtis distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 23 May 1969, while serving as a Medial Aidman attached to Company C, 2d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, on a bridge security mission. In Bihn Phouc Province. While the friendly element was on bridge security, a large Viet Cong force launched a massive attack, using rockets, mortars, and automatic weapons. During the initial barrage, Private First Class Curtis was wounded in the face and head by fragments from a mortar round. Ignoring his wounds and with complete disregard for his own safety, he moved from position to position, seeking those who might need his help. When he discovered two men lying wounded in an exposed area, he braved a hail of fire to drag them to safety and treat them until his own wounds caused him to collapse. Private First Class Curtis' extraordinary heroism in close combat with an armed hostile force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 6908 (June 18, 1969)

*DAILEY, PAUL M.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Squadron, 11th Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 1 May 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Paul M. Dailey, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Dailey distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 1 May 1970 while serving as a Medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date Troop G, to which Private Dailey was attached, and company H were on a reconnaissance mission in Cambodia, when they encountered a well fortified enemy force. Two of the lead tanks received hits from rocket-propelled grenades which injured the crew members and totally disabled the vehicles. Dismounting his own vehicle, Private Dailey ran to assist the injured men. However, the enemy fusillade was so intense that he was unable to aid them. Again, disregarding his own safety, Private Dailey quickly mounted one of the nearby vehicles and began placing intense suppressive fire towards the enemy from an exposed position. He bravely continued his barrage until an enemy rocket-propelled grenade struck the vehicle, mortally wounding him. Private Dailey’s actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders No 2793, 1 July 1970, Headquarters, II Field Force, Vietnam

DAVIS, EDWARD W.
Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army
Field Epidemiology Survey Team (FEST), 5th Special Forces Group
Date of Action: November 1967
Synopsis: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class Edward W. Davis, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Davis distinguished himself by gallantry in action on November 1967 while serving with Field Epidemiology Survey Team (FEST), 5th Special Forces Group, in Dak To, Kon Tum Province, the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Davis, preventive medicine specialist, was in Dak To conducting live rodent trapping in the vicinity of the camp the day before the attack. Davis single-handedly operated and fired the camp’s only 4.2 inch mortar, a procedure normally requiring a multiple man crew. When the volume of incoming fire became too heavy around his above-ground position, he ran to and operated an 81mm mortar by himself, bringing fire on the enemy entrenched on the ridge line, overlooking the camp. Davis was wounded during one of his attempts to man the camp’s mortars, but still managed to treat other wounded personnel.
General Orders: General Order needed

*DEAL, FLOYD ANDREW
Sergeant, U.S. Army
B Company, 3rd Battalion, 503rd Infantry, 173rd Airborne Bde
Date of Action: 7 April 1969
Citation Needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant Floyd Andrew Deal (ASN: US-18953934), United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. His gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.

*DENNY, ROGER EDWARD
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Battery A, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 30th Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 11 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Roger Edward Denny (ASN: US-54762684), United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Denny distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 11 March 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman attached to Battery A, 1st Battalion (Airmobile), 30th Artillery, 1st Cavalry Division, during an enemy attack. When his unit's perimeter came under an intense enemy rocket, mortar and ground attack and several casualties were sustained, Specialist Denny exposed himself to the hostile fire as he left the security of his bunker to administer first aid to the wounded personnel. With complete disregard for his own safety, Specialist Denny shielded a wounded comrade as additional enemy mortars exploded in the area. At this time Specialist Denny was mortally wounded. His gallant action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 3735, Headquarters, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile) March 28, 1969

DICKERSON, ROBERT
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Troop B, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 15 December 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Robert Dickerson, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Dickerson distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 15 December 1969 while serving as a medic with Troop B, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date his troop was engaged in a fierce firefight when a rocket-propelled grenade slammed into a demolition tank, seriously wounding the gunner and commander. Reacting instantly, Private Dickerson exposed himself to the intense small arms and recoilless rifle fire as he made his way to the vehicle. He quickly administered aid to the injured crewmen and made certain that they were evacuated. He then moved through the other injured men, giving aid where needed and at one point he helped to resupply ammunition. Private First Class Dickerson’s actions were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Order: General Orders No 1130, HQ, II Field Force Vietnam 26 March 1970

DOWDING, ARTHUR L.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Troop G, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 19 August 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Four Arthur Dowding, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Dowding distinguished himself by heroism in connection with military operations against a hostile force on 19 August 1968 while serving as a medical aid man with Troop G, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Troop G was conducting a reconnaissance in force mission in a rubber plantation near the village of Loc Ninh when it was suddenly struck by an intense volume of small arms, automatic weapons and antitank rocket fire from well-entrenched North Vietnamese Army elements. In the initial burst of fire, the medical vehicle in which Specialist Dowding was riding received a direct hit from an antitank rocket, severely wounding him. Ignoring his painful wounds, Specialist Dowding immediately dismounted his vehicle and dashed through the intense enemy fire to the other vehicles which had been hit by the hostile fire. He administered first aid until he was physically unable to carry on and was evacuated. After having his wounds treated, Specialist Dowding struggled to his feet and assisted in treating casualties at the rear station until all of the wounded had received medical care. Specialist Four Dowding’s unwavering devotion to duty, disregard of personal safety and deep concern for the welfare of his comrades in arms were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Order: General Orders No 1579, HQ, II Field Force Vietnam, 2 November 1968.

*DRIZA, STANLEY WILLIAM
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 22 December 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Stanley William Driza (ASN: RA-12734388), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Specialist Fourth Class Driza distinguished himself by heroic actions on 22 December 1967, while serving as a Platoon Medic with Company D, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, on a search and destroy operation in the vicinity of Xom Bao Dung, Republic of Vietnam. The company was moving south when given the order to hold up for a short break and as the unit paused the right flank security squad came under intense enemy RPG-2 rocket and automatic weapons fire. The initial burst of enemy fire resulted in two casualties and Specialist Fourth Class Driza maneuvered quickly across the front of his platoon in an attempt to reach the wounded men. Crossing the enemy firing lanes, Specialist Driza managed to reach one of the wounded men and began making his way back to friendly lines when both men were mortally wounded by hostile small arms fire. Due to Specialist Driza's valorous actions the mission was successfully completed. Specialist Fourth Class Driza's personal bravery and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

*DYER JR., JOSEPH FRANCIS
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503rd Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade
Date of Action: 18 November 1967
Citation:;
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Joseph Francis Dyer, Jr. (ASN: US-52853124), United States Army, for gallantry in action: Private First Class Dyer distinguished himself by gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 18 November 1967, while serving as a Medical Aidman in Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Alpha Company met with the enemy in an attempt to take hill 882 and received heavy casualties. Private Dyer quickly moved to the point of contact and began to administer medical aid to the wounded. Arriving at the side of a seriously wounded man, he began immediate treatment when he came under heavy and accurate fire by the North Vietnamese Army Force. He began dragging the wounded man to cover and was wounded during the accomplishment of this task. Private Dyer continued to administer medical aid to the wounded man while behind the cover of a tree. The enemy discovered his position and began to concentrate automatic weapons fire on his position. In an effort to protect his casualty, he placed his body between the wounded man and the enemy fire and was killed moments later by the enemy fire. Private Dyer’s devotion to duty and compassion for the wounded were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 11, Headquarters, I Field Force Vietnam, 6 January 1967
Home of Record: Pittsburgh, PA

*EBERHARDT, PHILLIP JOHN
Corporal, U.S. Army
9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 8 January 1968
Synopsis: Citation Needed
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (posthumously) to Corporal Phillip John Eberhardt, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Corporal Eberhardt’s personal bravery and devotion to duty at the cost of his life are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Order: Unknown
Home of Record: Tewaukee, WI

EBERWINE, JAMES A.
Major, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
82nd Medical Detachment (Hel Amb), 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 26 March 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major James A. Eberwine, Medical Service Corps, United States Army for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Major Eberwine distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 March 1967 while serving as Aircraft Commander of a Dustoff helicopter on an aeromedical mission in the Tam Binh District. Seeing a helicopter crash during an assault on an enemy position, Major Eberwine braved intense hostile fire to land his craft for a rescue attempt although the ship received several hits during the landing. Withering automatic weapons fire raked his craft once he landed, but he refused to abort the mission or take off until all of the wounded were aboard. One of his crewmembers was killed and the plane was receiving heavy damage but he remained calm as he directed the loading of his craft. During takeoff he was seriously wounded and his helicopter crashed, but he refused aid or evacuation until everyone was out of the burning wreckage. Bleeding profusely and in great pain, he moved toward friendly positions as enemy fire struck all around him pinning him down numerous times. His bravery and calmness under fire saved the lives of his comrades. Major Eberwine’s gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order 4653, Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam, 13 September 1967

*EDWARDS, THOMAS R.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 6 June 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (posthumously) to Specialist Four Thomas Edwards, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action in connection with military operations against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Edwards distinguished himself by gallantry in action involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 6 June 1968 while serving as Medical Aidman with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Specialist Edwards’ unit was participating in a reconnaissance in force mission when his platoon was suddenly attacked by a heavy concentration of enemy small arms, automatic weapons and antitank rocket fire. Observing the lead vehicle receive a direct hit from an enemy rocket, Specialist Edwards, totally disregarding his personal safety, crawled through the intense fire raking the battlefield to aid the wounded members of the crew. After administering first aid to the injured soldiers, Specialist Edwards, with hand grenades and his personal weapon, crawled to a position close to the enemy and killed all of them. Then, seeing his platoon sergeant wounded, Specialist Edwards sprinted 100 meters through the intense hostile fire to administer first aid and to carry him to a medical evacuation point. Specialist Edwards’ unwavering devotion to duty, deep concern for the welfare of his comrades and heroic actions while under hostile fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Order: General Orders No 896, HQ, II Field Force Vietnam, 9 August 1968

ESMOND, MICHAEL D.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
B Troop A, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry, Americal Division
Date of Action: 27 September 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Michael D. Esmond, United States Army, for gallantry in action against a hostile force on 27 September 1967 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date Private First Class Esmond was assigned as the aidman for a cavalry platoon which was aiding two pinned down infantry platoons. Private Esmond was mounted in the platoon leader’s armored cavalry assault vehicle which had moved into the line of enemy fire to shield the infantrymen. Private Esmond unhesitatingly dismounted and moved to the aid of sixteen soldiers who lay in the paddy. With complete disregard for his own safety, he helped all the infantrymen out of the bullet swept area to the safety of the vehicle. After the wounded were evacuated by helicopter, the vehicles returned to the rest of the platoon where they received instructions to move into dense jungle, from which the remainder of the troop was receiving intense automatic weapons fire. Upon entering the edge of the foliage the troop came under an enemy hand grenade assault. Unhesitatingly Private Esmond again responded to the call for assistance, as he dismounted and ran across 100 meters of open terrain, under intense machine gun fire, to the troop commander’s vehicle. While administering aid to the wounded troop commander, the vehicle carrying the platoon’s infantry squad was hit by grenades, resulting in five casualties. Private Esmond, fearlessly exposing himself, ran toward the infantry vehicle some 75 meters away. After traveling only a few feet, he was knocked to the ground by a round from an enemy grenade launcher. Although wounded, he courageously arose and continued to the aid of his wounded comrades. After treating the infantrymen, the cry for the medic came from his own vehicle. Once again, with resolute devotion to duty, he fearlessly exposed himself to the grenade and machinegun fire and dashed back to his own track and treated his wounded platoon leader and machine gunner. Only after insuring there were no further casualties in the platoon, did Private Esmond attend to his own wounds. The entire time Private Esmond was moving from vehicle to vehicle to render aid he was under intense enemy fire and he repeatedly exposed himself to the enemy guns. Private First Class Esmond’s extraordinary heroism and tenacious dedication to duty while in the face of enemy fire are in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 980, Headquarters, Americal Division, 25 October 1967
Home of Record: Philadelphia, PA

FABIAN, HERBERT
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 11 January 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Four Herbert Fabian, United States Army, for gallantry in action. Specialist Four Fabian distinguished himself by gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with and armed hostile force on 11 January 1969 while serving as a medic with Troop A, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date when one platoon of his troop was attacked by an enemy force of superior size, the entire crew of his armored personnel carrier was wounded in the initial contact. Reacting instantly and disregarding his own safety, Specialist Fabian assumed a fully-exposed position in order to administer first aid to his wounded comrades and move them to an evacuation site. Returning to the scene of the fierce engagement, he grabbed a machine gun and began directing suppressive fire upon the hostile forces. When he observed a number of wounded comrades in danger of being overrun by a group of enemy soldiers, he exposed himself to the full intensity of the enemy and, with devastating machine gun fire, killed three hostile troops and scattered the rest. He then continued to administer aid to his wounded comrades until the enemy positions had been overrun. Specialist four Fabian’s courage, dedication to duty, and deep concern for the lives of his comrades were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders Number 772, HQ, II Field Force Vietnam, 25 March 1969

FELGENHAUER, CARL L.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 12 April 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Carl L. Felgenhauer (ASN: RA-15665028), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Specialist Fifth Class Felgenhauer distinguished himself by heroic actions on 12 April 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 3d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Felgenhauer's company had moved into its night defensive positions when it came under an intense enemy mortar and ground attack. Realizing that a nearby company was absorbing the largest portion of the attack, Specialist Felgenhauer ran through the intense enemy fire to the beleaguered company's location and immediately began giving first aid to the casualties. He established an aid station in a protected location and instructed several Aidmen to treat the wounded. Throughout the battle, Specialist Felgenhauer, with complete disregard for his own safety, ran through the intense enemy fire to the friendly positions to treat and evacuate the wounded soldiers to the aid station. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission and defeat of the enemy force. Specialist Felgenhauer's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the 25th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 5800 (August 10, 1968)
Home of Record: Cleveland, Ohio

FIKE, JERRY REGAN
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Battery A, 3d Battalion, 82d Artillery, Americal Division
Date of Action: 11 – 12 May 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Jerry Regan Fike (ASN: US-56707716), United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an army hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Fike distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions while serving as Battery Medic for Battery A, 3d Battalion, 82d Artillery, Americal Division, on 11 and 12 May 1968. On that date, his battery was reinforcing the beleaguered Kham Duc Special Forces camp when a superior enemy force launched a large rocket and ground attack. Specialist Fike quickly took action as he moved, without regard for his own personal safety, from gun section to gun section, administering first aid to the wounded men in the battery. During the heaviest part of the mortar attack, Specialist Fike literally crawled from howitzer to howitzer, quickly administering aid to the wounded. Because of Specialist Fike's outstanding knowledge as an Aidman, he was able to save the lives of many of the men in the battery by stopping serious bleeding and preventing shock among the wounded. After each succeeding mortar attack, Specialist Fike immediately responded to the call of the wounded. Specialist Fourth Class Fike's courageous acts and extraordinary heroism in pursuing his mission are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order No. 5707, Headquarters, Americal Division, August 14, 1968

FITZGERALD, JR., THOMAS M.
Specialist Five, U.S. Army
First Platoon, Troop A, 3rd Squadron, 5th Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 23 March 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Thomas M. Fitzgerald, Jr., United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force. Specialist Five Fitzgerald distinguished himself by valorous actions on 23 March 1969 by exposing himself to a withering hail of enemy fire in order to offer treatment and assistance to the wounded. Specialist Fifth Class Fitzgerald was attached as a Medic to the First Platoon of Troop A, 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry Regiment, while the unit was engaged in a reconnaissance in force mission in the Dong Ha Valley, Republic of Vietnam. During the course of the mission the unit came upon an almost impassable stream. When the Medic Track of the troop began to slowly maneuver across the stream, elements of the North Vietnamese Army launched a well organized and highly effective attack. The Medic Track took a direct hit by an enemy RPG, killing the driver and wounding the remainder of the crew, including the unit's Vietnamese interpreter. Realizing that the Medics were unable to treat themselves or the other crewmembers, Specialist Fifth Class Fitzgerald abandoned the protection of his armored vehicle and maneuvered 400 meters to the injured crew. In order to do so, he was required to crawl under extremely heavy enemy fire directed at him by the determined enemy. After reaching the vehicle, he again exposed himself to the enemy fire in order to treat and comfort the wounded. The personal courage of Specialist Fifth Class Fitzgerald undoubtedly saved the lives of five of his fellow Americans and the life of a Vietnamese interpreter. His actions and devotion to duty are a great credit to himself, the 3d Squadron, 5th Cavalry, and the United States Army.
Home of Record: Pittsburg, Pennsylvania

*FLORES, RAMON AGUILAR
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 7 October 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Ramon Aguilar Flores (ASN: RA-15962132), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Private First Class Flores distinguished himself by heroic actions on 7 October 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. While on a combat operation, Company B came under an intense hostile attack inflicting numerous casualties. With complete disregard for his own safety, Private Flores exposed himself to a heavy volume of hostile fire as he moved through the bullet swept area to the aid of a wounded comrade. Although he was wounded, Private Flores, ignoring his own painful wound, continued to move forward to reach his wounded comrade. While administering first aid to the injured soldier, Private Flores was fatally wounded. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission. Private Flores' personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 8478, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, 29 November 1968

FORCE, JIMMY R.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Troop K, 3rd Squadron, 1th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 21 May 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Jimmy R. Force, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Force distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 May 1967, while serving as a medical corpsman participating in a convoy escort mission along Highway 1 near Soui Cat, Republic of Vietnam, when the unit was suddenly engaged by an estimated battalion of Viet Cong who directed a withering volume of recoilless rifle, mortar, automatic weapons, and small arms fire upon the convoy. Although wounded in the initial burst of enemy fire, Specialist Force disregarded the intense fire and the pain of his wounds as he courageously began treating the injured members of his vehicle. After aiding these crew members, Specialist force gallantly dashed through the withering fire and pulled two men from their vehicle which was burning and in danger of exploding. Throughout the fierce encounter with the enemy, Specialist Force treated all 23 wounded soldiers and contributed significantly to saving many lives. Specialist force’s courage and devotion to duty were an inspiration to all those with whom he served. Specialist Four Forces’s extraordinary heroism in close combat with a numerically superior Viet Cong force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders number 3788, Headquarters 9th Infantry Division, 1 August 1967

FOX, REINIS (First Award)
Warrant Officer W1, U.S. Army
54th Medical Detachment, 67th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 26 September 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Warrant Officer Reinis Fox, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 26 September 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant Officer Fox distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 September 1968 as pilot of an ambulance helicopter near Tam Ky. A platoon was pinned down in a rice paddy and suffered several casualties from intense fire placed by a North Vietnamese Army battalion occupying positions on two small hills only fifty meters away. An extraction helicopter, a gun ship and a light observation plane which were supporting the unit had been shot down by enemy fifty caliber machine gun fire. Moments after Mister Fox reached the area, a Marine jet went down in flames. Mister Fox was informed that a forty man relief force was attempting to reach the trapped platoon and secure a landing zone, but was unable to cross the bullet swept rice paddy. Circling within range of the enemy machine guns, he located the platoon and decided upon the best route to the landing zone. He then skillfully maneuvered through the hostile fusillade, to which he was vulnerable for approximately two hundred meters of low level flight, and evacuated seven critically injured men. After safely exiting the area, he sped his patients to a hospital for lifesaving treatment. Warrant Officer Fox’s gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 675, Headquarters, Department of the Army, United States Army Vietnam, 26 February 1969
Home of Record: Florida

*FOX, REINIS (Second Award)
Warrant Officer W1, U.S. Army
54th Medical Detachment, 74th Medical Battalion, Americal Division
Date of Action: 1 October 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star to Warrant Officer Reinis Fox, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 1 October 1968 in the Republic of Vietnam. Warrant officer Fox distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 1 October 1968 while serving as the pilot of a dust-off helicopter with the 54th Medical Detachment. On that date, Warrant Officer Fox was engaged in the medical evacuation of fourteen injured men in the vicinity of the Thien Phouc Special Forces Camp. On the first attempt to evacuate the wounded men, Warrant Officer Fox’s aircraft was shot down by hostile fire, and he was evacuated from the area. Completely disregarding his own personal safety, Warrant Officer Fox volunteered to return to the area and attempt to complete the mission. With the help of supporting gunships, he succeeded in landing his aircraft and remained on the ground long enough for nine of the casualties to be loaded onto his craft. Once airborne, his aircraft continued to receive fire from the insurgents and sustained several hits, putting it into a tailspin and causing it to crash land. Upon impact, the aircraft burst into flames and in the ensuing holocaust, Warrant Officer Fox was seriously burned over a large portion of his body. Warrant Officer Fox’s personal heroism, professional competence, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 8239, Headquarters, Americal Division, 26 October 1968
Home of Record: Florida

GARCIA, PEDRO INCARNATION (KIA)
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 2nd Battalion (Airborne, 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate)
Date of Action: 5 October 1966
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Pedro Incarnation Garcia, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 5 October 1966, while serving as a Platoon Medic in Company C, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate), in the Republic of Vietnam. The company encountered a dug-in enemy force while conducting a search and destroy operation and engaged the enemy at very close range. With complete disregard for his own life and safety, Private First Class Garcia advanced through a hail of enemy small arms fire and hand grenades to treat the wounded. He dragged wounded men back to safer positions to treat them. He continued to move throughout the area exposing himself to the enemy fire on numerous occasions, completely disregarding his own wounds in order to insure that all the wounded men were cared for and prepared for evacuation. Private First Class Garcia was wounded a second time but again refused medical aid for himself and continued to treat the other wounded men until the fight ended. Private First Class Garcia's outstanding display of aggressiveness, devotion to duty and personal bravery were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 264, Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, Dec 17, 1966
Home of Record: Corpus Christi, TX
KIA: 25 March 1967

GASKIN, GORDON W.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Medical Company, 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 11 May 1969
Citation:
By direction of the President of the United States of America, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), has awarded the Silver Star to Specialist Four Gordon W. Gaskin, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Specialist Four Gaskin distinguished himself on 11 May 1969 while serving as medical aidman aboard a helicopter ambulance during a rescue mission near Long Binh in the Republic of Vietnam. Responding to an urgent request to pick up two survivors of the crash of a light observation helicopter downed by enemy ground fire, Specialist Gaskin and fellow crewmen immediately boarded their evacuation helicopter and flew to the crash site. When they arrived over the wreckage, friendly helicopter gunships were in the area engaging numerous hostile targets on the ground and receiving return automatic weapons fire. Despite the presence of enemy troops in close proximity to the downed aircraft, Specialist Gaskin and fellow crewmen elected to make a descent into the area and attempt a pick-up. As soon as the evacuation helicopter touched ground, Specialist Gaskin disembarked the aircraft and rushed some forty meters under barrages of enemy fire to the aid of the wounded airmen. Upon reaching the wreckage, Specialist Gaskin found one airman dead and the other lying incapacitated in the wreckage. Under continuous enemy fire, Specialist Gaskin dragged the wounded man back to the air ambulance for evacuation to medical facilities. Even as the air ambulance lifted off from the pick-up site, enemy rounds ripped through its fuselage. Specialist Four Gaskin’s gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 527, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 24 February 1970

GILBERT, CARL NORMAN
Captain, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 7 August 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Medical Corps) Carl Norman Gilbert (ASN: 0-5325697), United States Army, for gallantry in action. Captain Gilbert distinguished himself by heroic actions on 7 August 1968, while serving as the Battalion Surgeon with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 5th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division, in the Republic of Vietnam. A numerically superior enemy force launched an intensive attack on a friendly base camp, inflicting numerous casualties. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Captain Gilbert ran through the barrage of enemy fire to aid a wounded soldier. He continually exposed himself to the devastating enemy fire as he treated the wounded man. After administering first aid, he again ran through the intense enemy fire to reach another fallen soldier, who was fatally wounded and died instantly. His valorous actions contributed immeasurably to the success of the mission. Captain Gilbert's personal bravery, aggressiveness, and devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, the 25th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 6248, Headquarters, 25th Infantry Division, 5 September 1968

*GILLIARD, EDWARD LEE
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company B, 5th Battalion, 46th Infantry Regiment, 198 Infantry Brigade, Americal Division
Date of Action: 23 February 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Edward Lee Gilliard, United States Army, for gallantry in action against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fourth Class Gilliard distinguished himself by intrepid actions on 23 February 1969 while serving as a Medic with Company B, 5th Battalion, 46th Infantry Regiment, 198th Infantry Brigade, Americal Division. On that date, the company was conducting a search and clear operation near the village of Liem Quang. While maneuvering through the area, an anti-personnel mine detonated which wounded three soldiers. Although seriously injured, Specialist Gilliard realized that his fellow soldiers needed immediate medical attention. Unable to move because of his injuries, he directed one of his comrades to treating the wounded. Through his timely actions, he contributed greatly to the success of the evacuation and undoubtedly saved the lives of two of his comrades. Specialist Fourth Class Gilliard's personal heroism, professional competence, and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Americal Division and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1877, Headquarters, Americal Division, March 21, 1969
Home of Record: Heidelberg, MS

GOLD, PAUL M.
Captain, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 28 June 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain Paul M. Gold, United States Army. Captain Gold distinguished himself by gallantry in action involving conflict with an armed hostile force on 28 June 1968 while serving as a Squadron Surgeon with the 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Troop A was conducting a mounted sweep operation through a known enemy area when it was suddenly attacked by a Communist force of unknown size. Two vehicles detonated mines and were totally disabled, every medical aidman in the troop was wounded and the troop was under an intense volume of enemy small arms, automatic weapons and antitank rocket fire when Captain Gold arrived at the scene. Upon reaching the area, Captain Gold, totally disregarding his own safety, leaped from his helicopter and ran across a minefield through intense hostile fire toward the two disabled vehicles. Completely ignoring shouted warnings concerning the presence of mines, he administered first aid to the wounded crewmen and then fearlessly went from one injured soldier to the next, rendering emergency medical treatment, Captain Gold’s unwavering devotion to duty, courage and disregard for his personal safety while under hostile fire were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders number 1504, Headquarters, II Field Force Vietnam, 21 October 1968

*GOSWICK, WESLEY IRA
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 18 May 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fifth Class Wesley Ira Goswick, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On 18 May 1967 Specialist Fifth Class Goswick distinguished himself while serving as a Combat Medic in a search and destroy operation near the Cambodian border. The company made contact with a North Vietnamese Army force estimated at regimental size in well-concealed and well-fortified positions. A furious fire fight ensued and the enemy began inflicting casualties. Specialist Fifth Class Goswick was moving quickly from position to position aiding the wounded when he heard a call for help from two men who had been hit and lay in a small clearing. As enemy bullets hit the ground around him he made his way to the men, treated them and then began to move them to safer positions. As he was carrying the first man to safety he received a leg wound, but this did not stop him. He retrieved the other man and sustained an arm wound, but his undying concern for the welfare of his comrades drove him onward. Despite intense pain he continued to make his rounds. When a call came from outside the perimeter, he responded quickly and advanced through intense enemy fire to the soldier's side. Even as the enemy advanced, he began to help the man back to safety. A round struck him in the shoulder but this stopped him only momentarily. As he neared the perimeter another bullet hit him and he was mortally wounded. Specialist Fifth Class Goswick's dauntless courage and intense dedication to the mission of a Combat Medic are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1906, Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, July 12, 1967
Home of Record: Gainesville, FL

GRANEY, PAUL MICHAEL
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
F Troop, 2nd Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 17 April 1971
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Paul Michael Graney, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Graney distinguished himself while serving as medical aidman with F Troop during a reconnaissance mission north of Trang Bang. During the initial engagement with a hostile force, Specialist Graney went to the assistance of wounded crew members amid intense enemy fire. While under constant enemy fire, he continued to maneuver about the contact area in order to render medical aid to the friendly casualties. Specialist four Graney’s gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders number 2354, Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam, 27 July 1971

GRATE, STEPHEN J.
Specialist Five, U.S. Army
Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 2 May 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Five Stephen J. Grate, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Five Grate distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 May 1970 while serving as an aid man with Troop C, 1st Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, the troop’s night defensive position came under an intense enemy indirect fire and ground attack. In the initial moments of contact, numerous friendly troops received injuries. Disregarding his own safety, Specialist Grate left the relative security of his vehicle and moved from position to position attending to the wounded soldiers. On many occasions, Specialist Grate exposed himself to small arms fire while caring for personnel. When his own vehicle was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade, Specialist Grate immediately maneuvered to the vehicle, performed first aid on the crew members, and carried one seriously wounded man through the intense enemy fire to the aid station. He returned to further provide medical assistance to his fellow soldiers. Specialist five Grate’s gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders number 3449, Headquarters, II Field force, Vietnam, 26 August 1970

GROSSO, JOSEPH X.
Captain, Medical Corps, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion (Airborne) 503rd Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate)
Date of Action: 21 - 22 November 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Captain (Medical Corps) Joseph X. Grosso, United States Army, for gallantry in action. Captain Grosso distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 21 November 1967 on a combat operation in the Republic of Vietnam while serving as battalion surgeon assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade (Separate). Captain Grosso entered the forward battle area at Hill 875 in the vicinity of Dak To, to supervise care of the wounded in the area. Captain Grosso started moving among the wounded awaiting evacuation, treating them and insuring that all possible aid had been rendered. Soon after his arrival, the area began receiving a heavy volume of rocket, mortar and small arms fire. Despite this, and with complete disregard for his personal safety, he continued to work with the wounded personnel. When he found that all the wounded awaiting evacuation had been cared for, he moved up the hill into the area directly behind Company B, 4th Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, which was making an assault on the deeply entrenched enemy force. Again, with complete disregard for his own safety, he started moving around the battle field, pulling wounded out of holes where they had fallen or were left, treating them and directing their evacuation to the rear. Although exposed to the full fury of mortar and small arms fire, Captain Grosso continued his search of the battle field until he was convinced that all wounded personnel had been found, treated and evacuated. He then moved out of the main assault area and back to the collecting point to insure that the more seriously wounded were being evacuated first. Captain Grosso continued his efforts throughout the day and night. Soon after darkness had fallen, several seriously wounded personnel were brought into the area. Captain Grosso treated them and stayed with them throughout the night until they were evacuated at first light on the morning on 22 November. Captain Grosso was then placed in charge of body collection teams.; He was charged with the responsibility of insuring that all bodies collected were properly tagged and identified prior to evacuation. As Captain Grosso started out on this difficult mission, the area was once again saturated with enemy mortar and small arms fire. Once again, he moved about the main battle area insuring that all bodies were properly identified and tagged prior to being moved to the rear. Captain Grosso continued his hazardous and difficult mission until he was severely wounded by an incoming mortar round. Captain Grosso’s extraordinary actions while under fire were directly responsible for the saving of an untold number of lives. His calm and methodical identification of bodies in the battle area was an accomplishment which eliminated a possible catastrophic mix-up of bodies being evacuated to the rear. Captain Grosso’s calmness, displayed aggressiveness, and devotion to duty under fire have been in keeping with the highest traditions of the service and reflect great credit upon himself, the Medical Corps and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 73, Headquarters, I Field Force Vietnam, 2 February 1968

HAMM, JOHN A.
Master Sergeant, Army Medical Department, US Army
37th Medical Company, attached for duty with Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment
Date of Action: 12 August 1970
Citation Write-up Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July 1918, a Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Master Sergeant John A. Hamm, Army Medical Department, United States Army, for action in Vietnam on 12 August 1970, while assigned to the 37th Medical Company, (attached for duty with Air Cavalry Troop, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment). Master Sergeant Hamm's unquestionable valor while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an insurgent force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the Army Medical Department, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 14, Headquarters, Department of the Army, 11 April 1997

HART, MICHAEL JOHN
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Combat Support Company, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division
Date of Action: 3 August 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fourth Class Michael John Hart, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force as a member of Combat Support Company, 2d Battalion, 16th Infantry Regiment, 1st Infantry Division, on 3 August 1969, in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Specialist Hart was serving with his unit as a Medical Aidman near Fire Support Base LORRAINE. The friendly unit was in an ambush position when 15 to 20 North Vietnamese soldiers were observed moving toward the kill zone. When the aggressors were within range, the ambush was initiated, and a fierce fire fight followed. The machinegunner was mortally wounded, and, as the platoon leader attempted to recover the body, he too received mortal injuries. With complete disregard for his own personal safety, Specialist Hart ignored the hostile fire raking the area as he maneuvered to the machine gun and placed devastating suppressive fire upon the insurgents which silenced so many aggressors that the remainder of the enemy force retreated. His courageous initiative and exemplary professionalism significantly contributed to the successful defeat of the insurgents and the recovery of the two friendly casualties. His actions were also an inspiration to all his comrades. Specialist Fourth Class Hart's unquestionable valor while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an insurgent force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, General Orders ?? (October 14, 1969)
Home of record: Boston, Massachusetts

HENDRICKSON, CHESTER MARSHALL
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile)
Date of Action: 17 September 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Fifth Class Chester Marshall Hendrickson (ASN: US-51778189), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Hendrickson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 17 September 1969, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a ground reconnaissance mission in Tay Ninh Province, Republic of Vietnam. When contact was established with an estimated platoon of enemy soldiers, several men were seriously wounded and needed medical attention immediately. Specialist Fifth Class Hendrickson moved forward into the contact area through heavy small arms and automatic weapons fire until reaching the wounded Skytroopers. He worked feverishly on the most seriously wounded men fire, then moved to others, bandaging their wounds, and giving encouragement along the way. With total disregard for his own safety, Specialist Fifth Class Hendrickson prepared the wounded for final evacuation, then he led the company commander and forward observer into the contact area, pointing out the enemy positions while still under heavy enemy fire. This action enabled the forward observer to place effective indirect fire on the enemy resulting in two enemy killed and many more wounded. Specialist Fifth Class Hendrickson's gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army
Home of Record: Tonawanda, New York

HICKS, FORREST PAUL
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 7 January 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Forrest Paul Hicks (ASN: US-51967411), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Hicks distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 7 January 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 12th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), during a search and destroy mission in Que Son Valley, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit became heavily engaged with a large enemy force, Private First Class Hicks exposed himself to the intense hostile fire as he administered first aid to the wounded soldiers. Disregarding his own safety, Private First Class Hicks moved from position to position, without concealment to aid the injured. His actions are responsible for saving the lives of many soldiers and was a source of inspiration to all who observed him. Private First Class Hicks' gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

*HIGH, THEODORE W., IV
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Date of Action: 15 May 1970
Posthumously
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fifth Class Theodore W. High, IV, United States Army, for gallantry in action on 15 May 1970, while serving as a Medical Aidman aboard a dust-off helicopter in support of troops of the Republic of Korea that had made contact with a Viet Cong force near Tuy Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. After flying through rain and darkness, the evacuation helicopter landed in a small, flare-lit extraction site. Upon setting down it was apparent that the eight patients were all seriously wounded and there would be some delay in trying to load all of the patients aboard the aircraft. Even though it was not his duty, Specialist High left the aircraft and began personally carrying the wounded to the waiting helicopter. As he was preparing to load one of the patients aboard the aircraft, an enemy shell exploded next to him. Even though mortally wounded, Specialist High boarded the aircraft providing a shield for his patients while doing what he could for them medically. Through his courage and devotion to duty, he contributed to the saving of human lives at the expense of his own life. Specialist High's supreme sacrifice was in keeping with the highest traditions of the Army Medical Department and reflects great credit on himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 25, 1971)
Home of Record: Augusta, Georgia

HILL, HUBERT O.
Specialist Sixth Class, U.S. Army
Company B, 9th Medical Battalion, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 19 April 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Specialist Sixth Class Hubert O. Hill (ASN: RA-14678458), United States Army, for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Sixth Class Hill distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on the night of 19 April 1968, while serving as a Clinical Specialist with Company B, 9th Medical Battalion, 9th Infantry Division, on a combat mission one mile east of Fire Support Base LAMBERT, Vietnam. A patrol from the 5th Battalion, 60th Infantry was in heavy contact with a determined enemy force. Volunteering to go on a mission to administer medical care to the wounded, Specialist Hill braved a heavy volume of machine gun and automatic weapons fire to crawl toward the disabled track. Specialist Hill administered first aid to two critically wounded men, then further exposed himself in order to move them to a medical evacuation site. His prompt and courageous actions were responsible for saving the life of one of the serious casualties. Specialist Six Hill's extraordinary heroism in close combat against a numerically superior Viet Cong force was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, General Orders No. 4860 (June 19, 1968)

HOFF, DENNIS WAYNE (First Award)
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment, 101st Air Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Private First Class Dennis Wayne Hoff, United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment, 101st Air Cavalry Division in the Republic of Vietnam on 1968. Private First Class Hoff's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number
Home of Record: Minneapolis, Minnesota

*HOFF, DENNIS WAYNE (Second Award)
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment, 101st Air Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 25 April 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting a Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster in lieu of a Second Award of the Silver Star to Private First Class Dennis Wayne Hoff (ASN: RA-16976060), United States Army, for gallantry in action while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 501st Infantry Regiment, 101st Air Cavalry Division in the Republic of Vietnam on 25 April 1968. Private First Class Hoff distinguished himself while serving as a Medical Aidman on a combat operation near Hue, Republic of Vietnam. His company was moving toward a village known to be infested with North Vietnamese and was attempting to move around a dangerous ambush site when one platoon came under fire from a woodline. With the initial burst of fire one man was killed and four others were wounded rather close to the woodline. Private First Class Hoff, the platoon medic, moved from his position at the rear of the platoon to crawl and run to the wounded men. Moving forward, firing at the enemy, he moved to the men, one by one, giving aid to each man. Completely disregarding the deadly fire all around him he worked tirelessly on the men. Knowing that to eliminate him would work adversely to the platoon's morale, the enemy poured a devastating amount of fire on his position, but Private First Class Hoff continued to move forward under the enemy automatic rifle fire, disregarding his own safety in order to reach the point man who was seriously wounded. While continuing to treat the man, Private First Class Hoff was mortally wounded and fell beside the man he was attempting to treat. His unswerving loyalty to his fellow soldiers and demonstrated ability as a Medic made his loss deeply felt throughout the platoon. Private First Class Hoff's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 3817, Headquarters, 101st Air Cavalry Division, 18 July 1968
Home of Record: Minneapolis, Minnesota

*HOLT, JAMES WILLIAM
Sergeant First Class, U.S. Army
Detachment A-101, Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces
Date of Action: 6 - 7 February 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Sergeant First Class James William Holt (ASN: RA-430769839), United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force while serving with Detachment A-101, Company C, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Hold distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 and 7 February 1968 while serving as a Medic with the Special Forces during an attack on the camp at Lang Vei. North Vietnamese Army forces launched a coordinated tank and infantry attack on the compound late in the evening of 6 February and inflicted numerous casualties on the defenders. Heedless of bullets striking all around him, Sergeant Holt dashed across the compound to treat the wounded and move them to safety. A recoilless rifle position was silenced by the enemy barrage, and he sprinted to the weapon to resume the firing. Tank cannon and machine gun fire was concentrated on his position, but he unflinchingly delivered accurate return fire, destroying two tanks before he ran out of ammunition. As he moved to secure more ammunition, his position was destroyed by a direct hit from a cannon round. Sergeant Holt then supplied himself with light anti-tank weapons and charged into the face of the enemy. Two tanks broke through the inner command perimeter, and he delivered deadly fire on them, scoring a direct hit on one of the armored vehicles. Sergeant First Class Holt's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 1913, Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, 25 April 1968
Home of Record: Hot Springs, Arkansas

HOMER, LANGDON E.
Specialist Five, U.S. Army
Company C, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 15 September 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress approved 9 July, 1918, a Silver Star for gallantry in action is awarded to Specialist Five Landon E. Homer, United States Army, who distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 15 September 1967 while serving as a medical aidman with Company C, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division during Operation Coronado in Dinh Tuong Province, Republic of Vietnam. During the operation, his unit encountered heavy fire from a numerically superior enemy force armed with grenades, rockets, recoilless rifles, and automatic weapons. His unit was pinned down in the face of the withering enemy fire; however, Specialist Homer, with complete disregard for his own safety, exposed himself to the intense weapons fire while moving from one position to another to give medical aid to his wounded comrades. He treated 18 of his fellow soldiers. Because of his dedicated and heroic actions, the unit was able to mount an attack through marshes and waist-deep mud and drive the enemy from the position. Specialist Homer’s heroism in close combat against an armed hostile force was keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflected great credit on him, the 9th Infantry Division, and the United States Army.

*HORST, ROBERT L.
Chief Warrant Officer, U.S. Army
159th Medical Detachment
Date of Action: 27 December 1971
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Warrant Officer One (WO-1) Robert Louis Horst, United States Army (Reserve), for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with the 159th Medical Detachment. Warrant Officer Horst distinguished himself on 27 December 1971 while serving as an Aircraft Commander of an aero-medical evacuation helicopter on a mission to evacuate the crew of a downed United States Army helicopter ten miles to the northwest of the city of Trang Bang, Republic of Vietnam. An insertion of the Republic of Vietnam forces took place in the area of XT 4020. A subsequent insertion drew heavy enemy fire, badly damaging one of the lift aircraft, heavy casualties were sustained and a request was made by the ARVN ground commander for a medical evacuation helicopter. Tomahawk 13 made an approach to the landing zone to attempt a pick up of wounded ARVNs. The fusillade of fire directed upon him caused him to abort the approach and attempt to climb out. At this time a rocket hit the aircraft and caused the ship to crash and burn. The crew managed to escape. Dust Off 107 piloted by Mr. Horst entered the landing zone and remained on the ground amidst intense enemy fire and not until all of the Americans and ten of the Vietnamese soldiers had been loaded did he depart the landing zone. Warrant Officer Horst's gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 1227 (October 27, 1972)
Home of Record: Springfield, MO

HUETHER, RONALD A.
First Lieutenant, U.S. Army
15th Medical Battalion, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 8 February 1971
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918, the Silver Star is presented for gallantry in action while engaged in ground operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. First Lieutenant Huether distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 8 February 1971 in the Republic of Vietnam. While on an urgent medical evacuation mission for a ground unit in heavy contact, First Lieutenant Huether’s aircraft came under intense antiaircraft fire from several enemy positions. With complete disregard for his own safety, First Lieutenant Huether maneuvered his aircraft into the fire zone to attempt the vital extraction. The enemy fire became so severe that First Lieutenant Huether was forced to abort because of heavy damaging hits to the aircraft. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Order: General Order 3634, HQ 1st Cavalry Division, 23 February 1971

HUGHES, KENNETH G.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
Company A, 3rd Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 3 March 1969
Synopsis: Citation Needed:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918, the Silver Star is presented for gallantry in action while engaged in ground operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist 4 Kenneth G. Hughes distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 3 March 1969 in the Republic of Vietnam. On that date, Private Hughes and his unit were overrun by the Viet Cong on a mountainside in the Plei Trap Valley near the borders of Cambodia and Laos. Private Hughes ran into the firefight to attend the wounded and was shot in the arm while attempting to treat an injured soldier. A comrade tried to help him finish the bandage but both were hit with a volley of AK-47 fire, wounding Hughes a second time. As the only medic available, despite the intense pain of his wounds Hughes refused morphine in order to advise others on how to treat the wounded. His gallant actions and dedicated devotion to duty, without regard for his own life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order unknown, Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, date unknown

*HUGHES, PAUL ARNOLD
Specialist Fifth Class , U.S. Army
14th Engineer Battalion, 45th Engineer Group, 18th Engineer Brigade
Date of Action: 22 October 1969
Posthumously
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Specialist Fifth Class Paul Arnold Hughes, United States Army, for gallantry in connection with military operations against an opposing armed force while serving with the 14th Engineer Battalion, 45th Engineer Group, 18th Engineer Brigade, in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Fifth Class Hughes distinguished himself on 22 October 1969 while serving as Medical Aidman with an engineer unit in the Republic of Vietnam. That afternoon, while the unit was returning to its night defensive position near Fire Support Base Barbara, the column of construction vehicles was ambushed by a platoon of North Vietnamese troops in concealed positions overlooking the roadway. A rocket-propelled grenade struck the lead bulldozer, severely wounding the operator. Seeing the soldier struck down, Specialist Hughes rushed forward from his position in the rear of the column in order to aid his fallen comrade. With enemy rounds impacting all about him, Specialist Hughes fearlessly crawled along the open roadway toward the lead bulldozer. He had advanced about twenty-five meters when he was mortally wounded in the hail of enemy fire. Specialist Fifth Class Hughes' gallantry in action, at the cost of his life, was in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Headquarters, U.S. Army Vietnam, General Orders No. 214 (January 24, 1970)
Home of Record: Waterbury, Connecticut

*JEWELL, PHILIP LAWRENCE
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 21 November 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Private First Class Philip Lawrence Jewell, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Private First Class Jewell distinguished himself while serving as a Platoon Medic with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division. On 21 November 1969, Company C was conducting a reconnaissance in force mission in the An Lao Valley when the point element suddenly came under enemy attack. With complete disregard for his personal safety, Private First Class Jewell rushed through intense enemy fire to reach a seriously wounded soldier lying in an exposed area. While moving toward his comrade, Private First Class Jewell was mortally wounded. Private First Class Jewell's personal bravery, perseverance and exemplary devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order number 887, Headquarters, 4th Infantry Division, 12 February 1970
Home of Record: Minneapolis, MN

JOHNSON, JAMES E.
Master Sergeant, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 26th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division
Date of Action: 1 April 1967
Citation:
By direction of the President, as established by an Act of Congress, 9 July 1918, and USARV Message 16695, dated 1 July 1966 the Silver Star is presented to Master Sergeant James E. Johnson for gallantry in action against a hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. On this date, Sergeant Johnson, while serving as the medical platoon sergeant during Operation Junction City, was engaged in one of the most decisive battles of the Vietnam conflict. After firing over 300 mortar rounds into the friendly defenses, the Viet Cong’s 271st Regiment launched a massive ground attack at Company C’s sector of the defensive perimeter. The insurgents penetrated the line and overran many of the friendly forces’ positions. The member of Company C fought relentlessly against the enemy as they swarmed through the break in the perimeter. As the other companies of the battalion launched a counterattack against the enemy, Sergeant Johnson, ignoring the heavy enemy fire, ran into the kill zone and began administering medical aid to casualties as the battle raged on around him. Without regard for his personal safety, he continually exposed himself to the hostile fire to treat the casualties and carry them to the evacuation area. Sergeant Johnson’s display of undaunted courage and outstanding devotion to duty undoubtedly saved the lives of many American soldiers. Master Sergeant Johnson’s unquestionable valor in close combat against numerically superior hostile forces is in keeping with the finest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 1st Infantry Division and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order No. 3439, Headquarters, 1st Infantry Division, 19 May 1967
Home of Record: Wilmington, Delaware

JOLLIFF, FRANCIS D.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: 8 August 1968
Citation:
By direction of the President, under the provisions of the Act of Congress, approved 9 July 1918, and USARV Message 16695, dated 1 July 1966 the Silver Star is presented to Specialist Fourth Class Francis D. Jolliff for gallantry in action involving close combat against an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Specialist Four Jolliff distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 8 August 1968, while serving as a Medical Aidman with Company C, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, on a reconnaissance in force mission. After his platoon had sustained four casualties in initial contact with the enemy, Specialist Jolliff, without regard for his own safety, ran into the midst of the battle in order to administer aid to the wounded men. While he was attending to one of the casualties, enemy fire wounded the man a second time, but Specialist Jolliff continued his treatment and then directed the evacuation. He continued to brave the intense fire throughout the action in order to reach and treat the casualties. Specialist Four Jolliff’s extraordinary heroism in close combat against a Viet Cong force is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 9th Infantry Division and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order No. 8689, Headquarters, 9th Infantry Division, 18 September 1968

JORDAN, CHARLES F.
First Lieutenant, Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
82nd Medical Detachment, (Hel Amb), 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade
Date of Action: 26 March 1967
Synopsis: Citation needed:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to First Lieutenant Charles F. Jordan, Medical Service Corps, United States Army for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam: Lieutenant Jordan distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 26 March 1967 while serving as Aircraft Copilot of a Dustoff helicopter on an aeromedical mission in the Tam Binh District. Seeing a helicopter crash during an assault on an enemy position, the pilot ignored the intense hostile fire to land his craft for a rescue attempt although the ship received several hits during the landing. Withering automatic weapons fire raked their craft once they landed. During takeoff the pilot was seriously wounded and Lieutenant Jordan took control of the helicopter. The aircraft received additional damage due to the heavy volume of fire subsequently causing it to crash. Lieutenant Jordan assisted all occupants to exit the burning wreckage. His bravery and calmness under fire saved the lives of his comrades. Lieutenant Jordan’s gallantry in action was in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Order Unknown, Headquarters, United States Army Vietnam, Date Unknown

*KELLY, CHARLES L.
Major Medical Service Corps, U.S. Army
57th Medical Detachment,
Date of Action: 19 June 1964
Citation:

The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918 (amended by an act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Silver Star (Posthumously) to Major, Medical Service Corps, Charles L. Kelly, United States Army, for gallantry in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving as an Aircraft Commander of the 57th Medical Detachment, on 19 June 1964. Major Kelly displayed professional skill, fortitude, and determination while participating in an aerial medical mission to evacuate several critically wounded Vietnamese troops. Although his first attempt to land the helicopter ambulance was prevented by intense enemy action, he returned within the hour and succeeded in maneuvering the aircraft into the area. As the small arms, automatic weapons fire, and mortar rounds fell near the aircraft, he exposed himself to the danger while assisting the wounded men on board the helicopter ambulance. When a round of ammunition hit the main fuel drain valve of the aircraft during the evacuation operations, he quickly assessed the situation and, through his decision that the patients on board be flown out immediately for medical treatment, the helicopter landed at a medical facility with a few minutes of fuel to spare. Through his courageous and unselfish actions the wounded men received timely medical aid and many lives were saved. Major Kelly's conspicuous gallantry is in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon himself and the military service.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 40 (December 11, 1964)
Home of Record: Warm Springs, Georgia

KOUTROUBA, WILLIAM G. (First Award)
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company , 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 10 October 1967
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant William Koutrouba, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Kourtrouba distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 10 October 1967, while serving as a medical aidman with Headquarters & Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry during an enemy attack on the forward command post of the 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry in Que Sanh Province, Republic of Vietnam. Observing a number of wounded comrades laying in an exposed area, Sergeant Koutroube, disregarding his own safety, exposed himself to the heavy enemy fire as he moved forward to assist his fallen comrades. While administering first aid to a wounded soldier, Sergeant Koutrouba spotted a hostile soldier nearby attempting to fire at hm. Again disregarding his own safety, Sergeant Koutrouba engaged and killed the enemy soldier. Continually exposing himself to the intense hostile automatic weapons fire, Sergeant Koutrouba moved through the open area to prepare the wounded men for extraction by a medical evacuation helicopter. His courageous action helped save the lives of a number of his comrades. Sergeant Koutrouba’s gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders 7209, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 3 December 1967
Home of Record: Boston, Massachusetts

KOUTROUBA, WILLIAM (Second Award)
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company , 5th Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 7 December 1968
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant William Koutrouba, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Kourtrouba distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 7 December 1968, while serving as a senior medical aidman with Headquarters & Headquarters Company, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry during an enemy attack. When his unit’s perimeter came under an intense enemy mortar attack and several casualties were sustained, Sergeant Koutrouba exposed himself to the hostile barrage as he left the security of his bunker and crossed an open area to administer first aid to the wounded soldiers. Realizing that the casualties needed to be evacuated to a more secure area, he utilized a nearby truck. Although enemy mortar rounds were exploding within the proximity of his position, Sergeant Koutrouba continued with his mission and successfully evacuated the wounded personnel. His gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service, and reflects great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders 2553, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 2 March 1969
Home of Record: Boston, Massachusetts

KOUTROUBA, WILLIAM (Third Award)
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
Company B , 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: 17 January 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress July 9, 1918, takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Staff Sergeant William Koutrouba, United States Army, for gallantry in action while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam. Staff Sergeant Koutrouba distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous action on 17 January 1969, while serving as senior medical aidman of Company B, 5th Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry during a combat mission in Rinh Long Province, Republic of Vietnam. When his unit became heavily engaged with a large enemy force and sustained several casualties, Staff Sergeant Koutrouba exposed himself to the intense hostile fire as he moved to a forward fighting position to administer first aid and evacuate the wounded personnel. With complete disregard for his own safety, Staff Sergeant Koutrouba moved to within ten meters of the enemy positions to retrieve the wounded soldiers. His actions undoubtedly saved the lives of several fellow soldiers. Staff Sergeant Koutrouba’s gallant action is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.
General Orders: General Orders No 5116, Headquarters 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile), 26 April 1969

KUSHNER, FLOYD HAROLD (POW)
Major, U.S. Army
Prisoner of War (Cambodia) 30 November 1967 to March 16, 1973
Date of Action: 29 July 1969
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Major (Medical Corps) Floyd Harold Kushner, United States Army, for exceptional gallantry in action while serving as a Prisoner of War on 29 July 1969. Major Kushner was interned in a prison camp in the jungles of Cambodia with other Americans. One American prisoner suffered a heart attack and was near death when Major Kushner was summoned. Despite the fact he was without equipment, he was able to revive the man. Major Kushner's devotion to duty and exemplary achievement are in keeping with the highest traditions of the services and reflect great credit on himself and the United States Army.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 56 (December 31)
Home of Record: Richmond, Virginia