U.S. Army Medical Department, Regiment
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Distinguished Service Cross - Vietnam War (M-N)

AMEDD Distinguished Service Cross Recipients > AMEDD Distinguished Service Cross Recipients of the Vietnam War

Interesting Notes:
In addition to the DSC, pilot and Medical Service Corps officer MAJ Moore earned two Distinguished Flying Cross awards while serving in Vietnam.

SP4 Meade, a conscientious objector who carried no weapon, earned his DSC while serving as a medic with an infantry unit.

Although all the DSC write-ups are exceptional, a few on this page are unique, such as those for PFC Moncavage and PFC Moore.

* Denotes Posthumous Award



*MADDOX, JULIUS
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: February 6, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Julius Maddox, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, 14th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Private First Class Maddox distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 February 1968 as medical aidman of an infantry company on a search and destroy operation near Hoi An. While crossing an open, dry rice paddy, his unit was hit by devastating fire from enemy soldiers entrenched in camouflaged positions within two meters of the friendly forces. The ravaging small arms and machine gun barrage killed or wounded many of the men in his platoon during the initial moments of the ambush, and the remainder of the friendly force withdrew to the concealment offered by a nearby cane field. With complete disregard for his welfare, Private Maddox sprinted across the bare terrain under a hail of fire to reach a wounded comrade and carry him to safety. Seeing a fellow medic hit, he returned through withering enemy machine gun fire to move the man to a helicopter evacuation landing zone. When the rescue ships arrived, he placed his patients aboard, secured a litter from one of the crews, and returned to aid soldiers still trapped in the deadly killing zone. He was shot in both legs by North Vietnamese fire, but ignored his wounds to carry another casualty to the waiting aircraft. He was urged to board the helicopter for evacuation, but he refused any aid for himself and returned to rescue more wounded. Only when he was certain that all his injured comrades were safe did he allow treatment and evacuation for himself. His courageous and selfless actions in the heat of battle were directly responsible for saving the lives of several fellow soldiers. Private First Class Maddox's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2555 (May 29, 1968)
Home Town: Detroit, Michigan

*MCDONALD, MARTIN TERRANCE
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 503d Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade,
Date of Action: April 10, 1971
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Martin Terrance McDonald, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Specialist Four McDonald distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 April 1971. On that date Specialist McDonald was serving as a medical aidman for a six man reconnaissance team on an offensive mission in Phu My District, when the team was taken under fire by an estimated platoon-sized enemy force. The enemy-initiated contact included rockets, machine gun and automatic small arms fire. In the initial hail of fire, the team leader was severely wounded, and the remainder of the team was halted a short distance away, leaving him in an open, vulnerable position. Specialist McDonald, although wounded himself during the initial contact, realized the extreme danger his team leader was in and, with total disregard for his personal safety, exposed himself to the intense enemy fire and ran to the aid of his fallen team leader. He then placed himself between the team leader and the enemy and began returning fire. An incoming rocket landed nearby, wounding him for the second time as the force of the explosion knocked him to the ground. He immediately recovered and rolled over on his team leader to protect him from the enemy fire. Realizing that further movement was impossible, Specialist McDonald stood up between the enemy and the severely wounded man and began placing accurate semi-automatic fire upon the enemy positions, until he was mortally wounded by an enemy rocket. Specialist Four McDonald's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army. 
General Orders:
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 32 (August 3, 1972)
Home Town: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

MEADE, WENDELL T.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: March 12 & 13, 1967
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Wendell T. Meade, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Meade (then Private First Class) distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 March and 13 March 1967 while serving as medical aidman for an infantry platoon on a combat mission near the Cambodian border. Specialist Meade's platoon was on its way to relieve another unit engaged with a numerically superior Viet Cong force when it made contact with the enemy. Weaponless because of his religious beliefs, he braved withering enemy fire to aid his critically wounded platoon leader. Time after time he disregarded his own safety to crawl across the bullet-swept area between his platoon and the enemy positions to administer to his stricken comrades. When half the platoon fell back to a more secure position, Specialist Meade remained behind to supervise evacuation of the wounded. At the new position he exposed himself repeatedly to enemy mortar and automatic weapons fire to build a shelter for the casualties. Although seriously wounded while moving to aid an injured comrade, he ignored his injury until treatment of the other man was completed. He continued to move along the perimeter treating the wounded throughout the night and refused evacuation the next morning until all others had been cared for. Specialist Four Meade's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4476 (September 2, 1967)

*MEARS, GUY L.
Specialist Four, U.S. Army
254th Medical Detachment, 45th Medical Company
Date of Action: 17 October 1970
Citation:
The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 9, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pride in presenting the Distinguished Service Cross (Posthumously) to Specialist Fourth Class Guy Lamar Mears, Jr., United States Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 254th Medical Detachment, 45th Medical Company, 44th Medical Brigade, 1st Logistics Command. Specialist Four Mears distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 17 October 1970. On that date Specialist Mears was serving as a crew chief aboard a medical evacuation helicopter near Tuy Hoa, Republic of Vietnam. The helicopter in which Specialist Mears was serving as a crew member exploded and started burning as a result of enemy fire. Specialist Mears escaped from the burning aircraft unharmed, but when he discovered the pilot of the aircraft remained trapped inside he re-entered the fiercely burning aircraft at the risk of his life in order to save the lives of fellow crew members. Specialist Mears continued his brave rescue attempt with total disregard for his own safety until he became incapacitated by mortal burns. Specialist Mears' conspicuous gallantry, extraordinary heroism, and intrepidity at the cost of his own life are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit on him, and the United States Army.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 23 (May 30, 1972)
Home of Record: Rockmart, Georgia

*MINOGUE, THOMAS FRANCIS
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: March 21, 1967
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Thomas Francis Minogue, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam on 21 March 1967, while serving as Platoon Medic for the Third Platoon, Company C, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. His unit was conducting a search and destroy operation in Kontum Province, Republic of Vietnam, and engaged a numerically superior enemy force. When the company commander was seriously wounded, Private Minogue ran through thirty meters of intense enemy fire to shield his commander with his body and treat his wounds. As the enemy charged the position, he ignored the intrinsic peril and threw himself across his leader and consequently received multiple gunshot wounds. His selfless actions also provided protection for the radiotelephone operator, who used his rifle and hand grenades to repulse the enemy and communicated with the platoons and battalion headquarters. Private Minogue continued to shield his commander as he and the radiotelephone operator moved him to a safer position. When the enemy assaulted their new position, he again covered the commander's body with his own and protected the radiotelephone operator. The company commander occasionally regained consciousness long enough to encourage his men and adjust air and artillery support. Private Minogue continued to treat him until overcome by his own mortal wounds. His extraordinary heroism not only saved the lives of the radio operator and company commander, but also made it possible for them to continue to operate the command post. The tactical and valorous significance of his heroism is highlighted by the fact that, without the operation of the command post, the company would not have survived until a relief force arrived to force the enemy to break contact. Private Minogue's supreme effort and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the Armed Forces of his country.
General Orders:
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 7 (February 14, 1968)
Home Town: New York, New York

*MONCAVAGE, DAVID JOHN
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 23d Infantry Regiment, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: February 14, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to David John Moncavage, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 4th Battalion, 23d Infantry, 25th Infantry Division. Private First Class Moncavage distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 14 February 1968 as medical corpsman of a mechanized infantry battalion conducting a search and destroy mission near Cu Chi. The battalion was savagely attacked by an enemy force of unknown size firing automatic weapons and rocket-propelled grenades from entrenched positions. Braving an intense hail of bullets and flying shrapnel. Private Moncavage moved throughout the battlefield and rendered emergency medical treatment to wounded soldiers. When he had aided all the casualties in his platoon, he continued to exposed himself to the enemy's raking fire as he administered skillful aid to wounded comrades of other platoons in his company. Private Moncavage then raced across a wide, open area of bullet-swept terrain and resumed his lifesaving mission for another company which had suffered heavy casualties. After all the wounded had been treated, he rejoined his platoon and gallantly volunteered to serve as an infantryman to help suppress the relentless enemy fire. Private Moncavage was mortally wounded while destroying a fortified enemy bunker with a hand grenade. His fearless and dedicated efforts in close combat saved the lives of many fellow soldiers. Private First Class Moncavage's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1738 (April 15, 1968)
Home Town: Scottsdale, Arizona

*MOORE, CHARLES THOMAS
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: January 5, 1970
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Charles Thomas Moore, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in action on 5 January 1970 in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division. On that date, when the First Platoon of Company D made contact with a determined enemy force located in a well-fortified bunker complex, a friendly trooper to the front was severely wounded. Despite his own wrist wounds, Private Moore, medical aidman for the First Platoon, moved through the intense hail of enemy fire to treat and evacuate the wounded soldier. Subsequently, a rocket impacted which strafed the area with shrapnel, wounding the First Platoon leader and further injuring Private Moore. Again with complete disregard for his own welfare, Private Moore moved to the aid of his platoon leader and evacuated the officer to safety. Then, noticing that his first patient had stopped breathing, Private Moore untiringly, and singularly performed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation until life and unassisted breathing were restored. As he was constructing a bamboo stretcher on which to carry this critically wounded trooper, Private Moore was shot in the hip and rendered unconscious. Minutes later, he regained consciousness, and although his many wounds now completely incapacitated his movement and his position was exposed, he began shouting valuable instructions concerning the necessary and vital treatment for the wounded. Even when he knew that death was imminent, Private Moore unselfishly ignored his pain and continued to give valuable medical instructions. Private Moore succumbed to his wounds before he could be medically evacuated, but not before he had saved the lives of many of his comrades through his conspicuous gallantry and extraordinary heroism. Private Moore's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 5 (February 25, 1971)
Home Town: Memphis, Missouri

*MOORE, DENNIS FRANCIS
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 187th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division
Date of Action: March 18, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Dennis Francis Moore, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving as the Senior Aidman with Company D, 3d Battalion (Airborne), 187th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 101st Airborne Division which was actively engaged in ground combat against enemy forces in the vicinity of Tan Uyen, Republic of Vietnam, on 18 March 1968. As the lead element of the company came under intense hostile small arms, rocket, grenade and machine gun fire, Specialist Moore left the security of the company headquarters element voluntarily to go to the aid of the wounded in the front element. As he approached the first of eight wounded comrades, he was seriously wounded in the leg and stomach. Completely ignoring his own wounds and safety he pushed ahead into the enemy fire. He discarded his personal weapon so as to better aid the wounded. In the course of moving from the first to the sixth man who lay only ten feet from an enemy machine gun bunker, Specialist Five Moore was wounded repeatedly. Not once did he stop to tend his own wounds but continued to crawl to the front, treating the wounded as he moved. He courageously moved to the lead man and began treating him, when he was mortally wounded by machine gun fire. Specialist Five Moore's extraordinary heroism and willing self-sacrifice are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and the Armed Forces of the his country.
General Orders:
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 33 (May 23, 1969)
Home Town: New York, New York

MOORE, DOUGLAS E.
Major (Medical Services Corps), U.S. Army
159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade,
Date of Action: December 10, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Douglas E. Moore, Major (Medical Services Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 159th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), 68th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade. Major Moore distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 10 and 11 December 1968 as commander of an ambulance helicopter near Trung Lap. Responding to a request to evacuate a critically wounded infantryman, Major Moore found that the ground unit was pinned down by enemy fire from a tree line one hundred meters away. Braving a hail of bullets, he maneuvered his ship down through trees and bushes into a tiny pickup site and successfully extracted the casualty. At twilight the same unit was in heavy contact with the communists, but was short on men and ammunition and was unable to secure a landing zone. While the infantrymen placed as much suppressive fire on the hostile positions as they could, Major Moore exposed his helicopter to the enemy snipers and rescued four more seriously wounded soldiers. During the night the North Vietnamese launched a heavy mortar, rocket- propelled grenade and automatic weapons attack. Early in the morning, after flying missions for several other units, Major Moore agreed to evacuate a number of casualties although illumination rounds would silhouette his aircraft and incoming small arms fire was still being received. A fierce enemy fusillade erupted as the ship touched down, but he calmly waited until eight casualties were aboard before departing the landing zone. He had barely cleared the perimeter when the North Vietnamese fusillade hit his ship from both sides and one round tore through his helmet, knocking him from the controls and sending the aircraft into a steep bank. Despite being wounded and unable to see out of one eye, Major Moore righted the helicopter and aided his pilot in reporting the enemy locations to the command and control ship and the ground elements. Major Moore's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1328 (April 16, 1969)

NEDOLAST, DANIEL A.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters &Headquarters Troop, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment,
Date of Action: April 15, 1969
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Daniel A. Nedolast, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Specialist Four Nedolast distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 April 1969 while serving as a medical aidman for a reconnaissance-in-force mission in the jungles northwest of Dau Tieng. In the first moments after a North Vietnamese force launched an attack on his troop, the foremost tank was hit by an enemy rocket. Observing that the explosion had halted the vehicle and wounded the entire crew, Specialist Nedolast dashed forward through the hostile barrage to assist the casualties. As he was mounting the track, a second rocket struck the vehicle and knocked him to the ground. He remounted the vehicle and pulled the wounded driver from his compartment carrying him to a safe location. Twice he returned through the fierce fusillade to remove injured crew members from the hazardous area. As the battle raged, Specialist Nedolast moved about the combat zone, treating wounded soldiers and assisting in their evacuation. Through his endeavors, thirteen men were successfully extracted and many lives were saved. Specialist Four Nedolast's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2947 (August 4, 1969)

*NELSON, WILLIAM DEWITT
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: November 6, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to William DeWitt Nelson, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four Nelson distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 6 November 1968 as a medic on a search and clear operations near Landing Zone Billie. His company made contact with a large well entrenched North Vietnamese Army force and during the initial barrage, was pinned down by the intense enemy fire and sustained heavy casualties. With complete disregard for his safety, Specialist Nelson ran across the open terrain to his injured comrades, treated their wounds, and carried them to an ambulance helicopter. Returning to the battle, he began to lay down an accurate volley of fire on the Communists' positions. During a brief lull in the fighting, he secured vital medical supplies and as the enemy renewed their attack, again moved unhesitatingly through the bullet-riddled area in response to a call for a medic. Seeing the company commander lying near a hostile bunker, Specialist Nelson placed himself between the fortification and the officer. Although wounded severely in the leg, he rapidly discharged an intense volume of fire as a fellow medic feverishly treated the injured commander. While Specialist Nelson was carrying the officer to the rear, a rocket landed inches from him, instantly taking his life. Specialist Four Nelson's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 426 (February 7, 1969)
Home Town: Long Beach, California

NICHOLS, PHILIP L.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division
Date of Action: June 20, 1966
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Philip L. Nichols, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company B, 2d Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Four Nichols distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 20 June 1966 while serving as a medic with a company conducting a heliborne assault on Hill 258, near Trung Luong. While debarking the helicopters, the first assault wave received intense hostile fire from entrenched Viet Cong on the higher portion of the hill. On several occasions, Specialist Four Nichols, with complete disregard for his safety while exposed to hostile machine gun fire, treated many wounded and carried them from the killing zone. When Specialist Four Nichols learned that one of the other platoons had suffered several serious casualties in an effort to outflank the Viet Cong positions, he immediately went to the aid of the platoon. Again, he braved intense hostile fire while treating and evacuating his fallen comrades. On his fourth trip into the killing zone, he was struck in the thigh by a hostile bullet. Despite his wound, he dragged a wounded man to safety. When he crawled back into the killing zone to aid another wounded comrade, he was hit in the same leg by two more bullets. Although bleeding profusely, he continued to treat the wounded until ordered to return to the medical extraction point. Refusing any assistance, he hobbled to the evacuation area. While awaiting medical evacuation, Specialist Four Nichols continued to administer first aid to his wounded comrades. Through his unimpeachable valor, he personally carried or dragged 10 wounded men from the killing zone and administered life saving first aid to many comrades while receiving intense hostile fire. Specialist Four Nichols' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5952 (October 6, 1966)

*NOELDNER, DANIEL MORRIS
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: March 6, 1969
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Daniel Morris Noeldner, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism while serving as a senior medical aidman assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division, near Pleiku, Republic of Vietnam, on 6 March 1969. On that day Sergeant Noeldner was serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, when it was ambushed by a force of the North Vietnamese Army. Several men in the point element were hit by the initial volley of fire and the cry for "Medic" was heard. Completely disregarding the intensity of the enemy attack and his own safety, Sergeant Noeldner rushed forward to the side of his wounded comrades. While treating the first man that he reached, he was wounded in the thigh. Refusing medical treatment for himself, he continued to assist the wounded while repeatedly exposing himself to the fire of the enemy force. Shortly thereafter he was again hit by enemy rounds while assisting his fellow soldiers. While attempting to bandage himself to stop the profuse bleeding another medic came to his aid, but Sergeant Noeldner directed him to check the other injured men. Although the crippling effect of his wounds prevented him from continuing his gallant mission, Sergeant Noeldner had significantly contributed to saving the lives of two men at the sacrifice of his own. His extraordinary heroism at the cost of his own life, above and beyond the call of duty, was in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflects great credit upon him and the Armed Forces of his country.
General Orders:
Department of the Army, General Orders No. 85 (December 15, 1969)
Home Town: South Shore, South Dakota

*NUSSBAUMER, STEVE OWEN
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Troop C, 1st Squadron, 1st Cavalry Regiment, 1st Armored Division
Date of Action: August 25, 1968
Citation:
Specialist Four Steven O. Nussbaumer, United States Army, distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism while serving as a Medic with the 2d Platoon, C Troop, 1st  Squadron, 1st Cavalry near Tam Ky, Republic of Vietnam.  On 25 August 1968, Specialist Nussbaumer’s troop was heavily engaged with an estimated North Vietnamese Army battalion.  The infantry unit working with his troop was pinned down due to intense fire.  Specialist Nussbaumer noticed that several infantrymen were wounded and not behind any type of cover.  Without hesitation, Specialist Nussbaumer jumped off his armored cavalry assault vehicle and charged through the deadly enemy fusillade to a point within 20 meters of the enemy positions to give the severely wounded men aid and carry them back to the relative safety of his vehicle for medical evacuation.  Observing several more wounded men lying in exposed positions, Specialist Nussbaumer braved the intense small arms, automatic weapons, and recoilless rifle fire to reach his helpless comrades.  Specialist Nussbaumer was fatally wounded during this selfless act of courage and devotion to his fellow soldiers.  His extraordinary heroism at the cost of his life saved the lives of two wounded soldiers and inspired his comrades to eventually annihilate the numerically superior enemy force.  Specialist Nussbaumer’s actions are in the highest traditions of the United States Army and reflect great credit upon him and the United States Army.
General Orders: Department of the Army, General Orders No. 36 (June 6, 1969)
Home Town: Hayward, California

*NUTT, WALTER LEE, III
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: April 28, 1969
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Walter Lee Nutt, III, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 4th Battalion, 39th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Private First Class Nutt distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 28 April 1969 during a reconnaissance-in-force mission near Fire Support Base Danger in Giao Duc District in Kien Phuong Province. As his platoon maneuvered through a densely vegetated area, Private Nutt walked behind the leading members of the file. Suddenly an enemy force initiated an ambush with a volley of shots that killed the first two men in the patrol and wounded four more. When he saw his fallen comrades, Private Nutt rushed through a hail of hostile fire and began to administer lifesaving aid to the injured. As he heroically made his way toward a third injured man, he was struck by enemy rounds which mortally wounded him. Private First Class Nutt's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders:
HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2500 (July 11, 1969)
Home Town: Des Moines, Iowa