U.S. Army Medical Department, Regiment
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Distinguished Service Cross - Vietnam War (A-B)

AMEDD Distinguished Service Cross Recipients > AMEDD Distinguished Service Cross Recipients of the Vietnam War

AMEDD Medal of Honor Awardees > MG Patrick H. Brandy

Interesting Notes:

Includes Major General Patrick Brady, also a Vietnam Medal of Honor recipient.

Although all of the DSC write-ups are exceptional, a couple of them are a bit different. On this page SP4 Bahl fought a fire, SP4 Beagle battled the heat, and SP5 Butts engaged the enemy, all while treating wounded comrades.

* Denotes Posthumous Award


AGUIRRE, JIMMY
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: December 4, 1967
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Jimmy Aguirre, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 47th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Five Aguirre distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 4 December 1967 as platoon medic of an infantry company conducting a waterborne reconnaissance mission in Dinh Tuong Province. The unit was patrolling a small canal aboard armored troop carriers when it was violently ambushed by an estimated Viet Cong heavy weapons company deployed on both sides of the canal. Specialist Aguirre's platoon immediately landed and led an assault on the enemy through a barrage of rocket, automatic weapons and rifle grenade fire. Hearing cries for medical aid from two comrades who had fallen fifty meters from his position, Specialist Aguirre raced across a bullet swept open field toward the casualties. He was hit and painfully wounded by fragments from an exploding enemy rocket. Ignoring his wounds he fired at the insurgents as he continued to move through the withering hostile fusillade. Upon reaching the wounded men, Specialist Aguirre skillfully administered first aid and moved them to a position of relative safety. He then returned to the battlefield and maneuvered toward two more casualties. Although wounded again by automatic weapons fire and flying shrapnel, he treated the soldiers and pulled them to cover. Detecting yet another wounded comrade lying near the Viet Cong positions, Specialist Aguirre refused medical aid for himself and crawled toward the smitten man. He was struck a third time by rocket fragments, but gallantly moved forward in the face of devastating fire and dragged his comrade to safety. Despite the pain of over fifty separate shrapnel and bullet wounds, he saved the lives of five unit members through sheer determination. Specialist Five Aguirre's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1414 (March 29, 1968)

ANAGNOSOTOPOULOS, JAMES
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry Regiment, 173rd Airborne Brigade,
Date of Action: February 27, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to James Anagnosotopoulos, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 503d Infantry, 173d Airborne Brigade. Private First Class Anagnosotopoulos distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 February 1968 while serving as a company medic during a search and destroy operation southwest of Kontum City. Contact was made with a North Vietnamese Army company, and several members of his unit's lead element were wounded in the first moments of the ensuing fire fight. Despite heavy concentrations of automatic weapons fire, Private Anagnosotopoulos raced across one hundred and fifty meters of open terrain to treat his wounded comrades. After pulling a seriously injured platoon leader to cover and giving him first aid, he moved forward to three casualties who were within ten meters of an enemy machine gun. As he worked on the wounded the North Vietnamese machine gunner raised up and began firing on his position. Private Anagnosotopoulos killed the enemy soldier with his pistol. He then completed giving aid to the three men and also treated two new casualties amid hostile sniper fire and hand grenades directed against him. He next organized the evacuation of his patients to a helicopter landing zone, personally carrying three of the wounded through the continuing enemy fire. When heavy fighting erupted a second time, Private Anagnosotopoulos rushed across one hundred meters of exposed land and aided in the rescue of five more wounded comrades. Private First Class Anagnosotopoulos' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4758 (October 14, 1968)

*BAHL, WALTER TIMOTHY
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: December 3, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Walter Timothy Bahl, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion (Airmobile), 7th Cavalry, 3d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Specialist Four distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 December 1968 as a medic on a reconnaissance-in-force mission northeast of Quan Loi. His company made contact with an estimated battalion-size North Vietnamese Army force located in well concealed positions and armed with automatic and semi-automatic weapons, rockets and mortars. Specialist Bahl immediately went to the aid of his comrades and, after evacuating all of the injured members of his element to a medical evacuation site, rushed to the platoon which was engaged in treating and carrying them to the evacuation point, the waist-high grass in which several of the casualties lay was ignited by the constant enemy barrage. Working feverishly, he rescued the men and then used his shirt to beat out the fire before he was forced back by the spreading flames, suffering burns and near exhaustion. Hearing a cry for a medic, he again risked the weathering hostile fire to reach the stricken soldier. He was painfully wounded by an enemy grenade as he started to render medical aid, but fearlessly began to pull the man to safety. Although wounded a second time, he still continued his attempt to remove his comrade until he was struck a third time by the hostile fusillade and was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Bahl's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 1140 (April 2, 1969)
Home Town: Denver, Colorado

BAILEY, OTIS J.
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Troop I, 3d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment,
Date of Action: November 24, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Otis J. Bailey, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Troop I, 3d Squadron, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment. Private First Class Bailey distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 24 November, 1968 as a medical aidman with a dismounted patrol searching a hillside for a report Viet Cong platoon. As the patrol moved down the jungle trail, it suddenly came under intense small arms and automatic weapons fire from a well camouflaged and heavily fortified bunker complex. Disregarding his safety, Private Bailey braved the fierce enemy fire to assist the three lead men, who had been wounded by the initial volley. He quickly treated the most critically injured trooper and, carrying him on his back, crawled out of the communist; field of fire. Returning to within two meters of the hostile strongholds, he aided another of the wounded men and brought him through a deluge of enemy machine gun fire and hand grenades to the patrol's rear. After administering to the third casualty who had been able to reach relative safety, he spotted two more wounded soldiers and again faced the communist fusillade to aid his injured comrades. Private First Class Bailey's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty where in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 685 (February 26, 1969)

BARTLEY, JULIUS I.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry Regiment, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: May 6, 1970
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Julius I. Bartley, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company C, 3d Battalion, 8th Infantry, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Bartley distinguished himself while serving as medical aidman during combat operations in Cambodia on 6 May 1970. On this date, Specialist Bartley and his company were inserted into a landing zone and immediately came under fire from a large, well concealed enemy force which inflicted many allied casualties. Ignoring the intense enemy fire, Specialist Bartley moved throughout the contact area to treat wounded comrades. After stabilizing the condition of several casualties, he removed them to rear positions and prepared them for helicopter evacuation. Seeing his platoon leader struck by enemy sniper fire, the specialist immediately went to his assistance and administered first aid to the wounded soldier. Then, the specialist carried the injured officer approximately two hundred meters through intense enemy fire to the company's perimeter. His determined actions served as a constant inspiration to his comrades and contributed immeasurably to the successful defense of the position. Specialist Four Bartley's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5304 (December 15, 1970)

*BEAGLE, HOWARD EUGENE
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division
Date of Action: April 11, 1967
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Howard Eugene Beagle, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 3d Battalion, 60th Infantry, 9th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Beagle distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 11 April 1967 while serving as medical corpsman during a search and destroy mission near Tan An. Specialist Beagle's unit was crossing dry rice paddies, still 200 meters from it's objective, when a Viet Cong force initiated a barrage of intense fire. As one of the men fell wounded, Specialist Beagle raced through the hail of fire to his side and began to treat his critical wounds. Soon another call for medical help was made. Oblivious of the outburst of fire his movement drew, Specialist Beagle ran 75 meters across the field to the new casualty. he pulled the soldier to a partially protected position behind a rice paddy dike, but at times was forced to shield the man's body with his own while he treated him. Since the hostile fire became very intense, he grabbed the wounded man's weapon and tried to silence some of the hostile positions. When another soldier came to relieve him, he finished his treatment, then ran again across the open paddies to the first casualty. As medical evacuation helicopters arrived, Specialist Beagle once more crossed the fields of fire to ensure that the wounded men were safely evacuated. Some of his comrades began to feel the effects of their strenuous exertions in the afternoon heat. Specialist Beagle assembled them and began to build a shelter to protect them from the sun. As he stood up to secure a corner of the shelter, he was mortally wounded. Specialist Four Beagle extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2428 (May 27, 1967)
Home Town: Glens Falls, New York

BLEDSOE, WILLIAM H.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 196th Infantry Brigade (Light), Americal Division
Date of Action: May 12, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to William H. Bledsoe, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 196th Infantry Brigade (Light), Americal Division. Specialist Four Bledsoe distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 12 May 1968 as a medic at Kham Duc Special Forces camp. He was stationed at an observation post when a large North Vietnamese force directed a series of mortar, rocket and ground attacks against it. When the post could no longer be defended, his team was ordered back to the base camp. While passing through a small village near the compound's perimeter, Specialist Bledsoe's element came under heavy mortar and small arms fire to aid his injured comrade. Afterwards, as the small band crossed into the perimeter, an enemy mortar round exploded in one of the camp's gun pits, and Specialist Bledsoe ran into the position and administered medical aid to the wounded. While he was treating the casualties, the emplacement was hit by another mortar round which severely wounded him and set fire to the position. Despite his wounds and the flames, he continued to treat the other casualties and move them to safety. He then prepared his patients for evacuation. As the ambulance helicopters arrived, one of them was shot down by the heavy enemy fire. Despite efforts to restrain him, Specialist Bledsoe ran over three hundred meters through a hail of mortar shrapnel to reach the downed aircraft. After freeing a trapped crew member, he carried the man through continuing intense fire to a position of cover. Specialist Four Bledsoe's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4325 (November 11, 1968)

BORIS, TIMOTHY D.
Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army
Company D, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry Regiment, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division
Date of Action: April 3, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Timothy D. Boris, Specialist Fourth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company D, 2d Battalion, 35th Infantry, 3d Brigade, 4th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Boris distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 3 April 1968 as medical aidman of an infantry company during a search and destroy mission. The company came under sudden, intense automatic weapons and mortar fire resulting in several casualties being trapped in the open. Abandoning the relative safety of his position, Specialist Boris rushed to aid one of his fallen comrades. He was wounded in the leg, but managed to move the injured soldier to safety and administer first aid. He again moved through a hail of bullets into the open to rescue another casualty, and he was wounded a second time as he carried the man to safety. Specialist Boris attempted a third rescue. As he crawled toward the injured man, he received a third wound which completely immobilized him and caused him to be evacuated. Specialist Four Boris' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 3369 (July 16, 1968)

BRADY, PATRICK HENRY
Major (Medical Service Corps), U.S. Army
54th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), 74th Medical Battalion, 67th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade,
Date of Action: October 2 & 3, 1967
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Patrick Henry Brady, Major (Medical Service Corps), U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with 54th Medical Detachment (Helicopter Ambulance), 74th Medical Battalion, 67th Medical Group, 44th Medical Brigade. Major Brady distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 2 and 3 October 1967 as pilot of an ambulance helicopter on a rescue mission near Tam Ky. A friendly force requested extraction of several seriously wounded soldiers from a mountainous jungle landing zone, and Major Brady volunteered to attempt the rescue although heavy storms had grounded numerous aircraft in the area. Flying by instruments and radar, he arrived in the area of engagement and began a vertical descent into the tight landing zone by the light of flares. Unable to see more than a few feet outside his aircraft, he skillfully maneuvered to the friendly forces, loaded his ship to capacity and quickly flew to the hospital. The storm increased in intensity and made flying extremely hazardous, but he returned to the pickup site and once more attempted to land. As he approached the area, enemy forces directed devastating machine gun and automatic weapons fire at him. Completely disregarding his personal welfare, he flew low over the area for forty-five minutes before he located the friendly forces. Guiding himself by the flashes of the enemy weapons, he flew into the landing zone through a curtain of fire and loaded eight patients. He quickly flew the patients to the hospital, and once more returned to pick up the remaining casualties and carry them to safety. His fearless actions were responsible for the rapid and successful evacuation of several wounded fellow soldiers. Major Brady's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2733 (June 7, 1968)
Home Town: Seattle, Washington
Other Award: Medal of Honor (Vietnam) See his Medal of Honor Citation. You can also read his oral history interview.

*BRENNER, KENNETH JAMES
Private First Class, U.S. Army
Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division
Date of Action: March 29, 1969
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Kenneth James Brenner, Private First Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Company A, 2d Battalion, 5th Cavalry, 1st Cavalry Division (Airmobile). Private First Class Brenner distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 29 March 1969 as a medic in Tay Ninh Province. While his Company was securing a perimeter to allow helicopters to deliver supplies, the unit came under intense fire from a nearby wood line. Exposed to a hail of bullets, Private Brenner advanced over a hundred meters to reach several wounded comrades who lay close to the enemy bunkers. Firing his rifle at the communists, he treated the casualties and aided in their evacuation. When all the injured had been rescued and his company withdrew, he went to the rear where he continued to administer medical treatment and helped load ambulance helicopters. After air strikes were directed against the foe, he joined his unit in a second assault. As he courageously tried to help a man caught in the hostile killing zone, he was mortally wounded by the enemy fusillade. Private First Class Brenner's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 2138 (June 17, 1969)
Home Town: Hope, Kansas

BROWN, LESTER W.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade, 25th Infantry Division
Date of Action: August 27, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Lester W. Brown, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2d Battalion, 27th Infantry, 2d Brigade, 25th Infantry Division. Specialist Four Brown distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 27 August 1968 while serving as a medical aidman with an infantry unit. He was a member of an ambush patrol operating five hundred meters beyond the main unit's defensive perimeter. The enemy launched an intense mortar and rocket attack on the small element, and followed it with a ground assault. Nineteen members of the thirty-man team became casualties. Specialist Brown moved through the heavy enemy fire and administered first aid to his wounded comrades until he had expended his medical supplies. He than crawled through a hail of bullets to the base camp where he gathered a desperately needed re-supply of medical materials and organized a rescue team. Leading two armored personnel carriers to the stricken patrol's location, he placed the wounded on the vehicles and returned with them to the unit's position. He was directly responsible for saving the lives of fourteen men. Specialist Four Brown's extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 5340 (November 17, 1968)

*BRUCKER, LESLIE L., JR.
Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army
Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces
Date of Action: August 25, 1968
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Leslie L. Brucker, Jr., Staff Sergeant, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Detachment B-20, Company B, 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), 1st Special Forces. Staff Sergeant Brucker distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 25 August 1968 as a medic and platoon leader of a mobile strike force company during an assault against fortified positions held by North Vietnamese Army troops inside the Duc Lap Special Forces camp. He was leading his platoon forward under intense enemy small arms and automatic weapons fire when he saw his company commander and a fellow medic felled by the fusillade. Disregarding his safety, Sergeant Brucker rushed across open ground through the withering hail of bullets to reach the fallen aidman. while treating the medic he was asked to help carry his wounded company commander out of the line of enemy fire. Sergeant Brucker moved the officer to safety with the help of another American, whom he then instructed to stop the bleeding until he returned with his aid kit. Ignoring a heavy concentrations of machine gun fire directed at his position, Sergeant Brucker returned to the injured medic. As he collected his aid kit and prepared to drag his comrade to cover, he was mortally wounded. Staff Sergeant Brucker extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the Unites States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4566 (October 2, 1968)
Home Town: Circleville, Ohio

*BUTTS, LONNIE R.
Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army
Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division
Date of Action: May 15, 1967
Citation:
The Distinguished Service Cross is presented to Lonnie R. Butts, Specialist Fifth Class, U.S. Army, for extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations involving conflict with an armed hostile force in the Republic of Vietnam, while serving with Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 327th Infantry Regiment, 1st Brigade, 101st Airborne Division. Specialist Five Butts distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions on 15 May 1967 while serving as senior medical aidman during a search and destroy mission near Duc Pho. When the lead element of his unit became pinned down by machine gun fire, Specialist Butts executed a flanking movement on the hostile emplacement and silenced the two Viet Cong who were manning it. He continued forward, moving from one emplacement to another and drove the enemy back with hand grenades and machine gun fire. One insurgent threw a grenade between Specialist Butts and his platoon sergeant. Taking no heed of his own safety, he threw himself between the sergeant and the grenade, catching most of the shrapnel in his legs. Although he was seriously wounded, Specialist Butts went to the assistance of another casualty and treated his wounds. During the remainder of the firefight, he refused medical attention until all of the other wounded men were treated. Specialist Butts was mortally wounded as he moved toward a helicopter for evacuation. Specialist Five Butts' extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty, at the cost of his life, were in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the Unites States Army.
General Orders: HQ US Army, Vietnam, General Orders No. 4149 (August 15, 1967)
Home Town: Oneonta, Alabama